List of science and religion scholars


List of science and religion scholars

Page's aim is a list of religion and science scholars who hold a diversity of backgrounds yet share the respect of peer-reviewed sources and their editors. The leading sources for this list are works found in or referenced in , [http://books.google.com/books?id=eyrikGwJfCsC The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science] , Issues in Science and Religion, and [http://www.srforum.org/ The Science and Religion Forum] 's [http://www.srforum.org/newsite/reviews.htm Reviews in Science and Religion] . Also included are scientists who have won the Templeton Prize.

cience and religion scholars

*Gordon W. Allport: wrote the book "The Individual and his Religion" (1951). [ Issues in Science and Religion pp. 189, 202, 335 ]
*Ian Barbour: wrote the book "Issues in Science and Religion" (1966). [ Arthur Peacocke, "Science and the Christian Experiment", Oxford University Press, 1971, in the preface (p.vii) writes "These [issues] have been most magisterially surveyed by I. G. Barour in his "Issues in Science and Religion" (London, 1966) and I willingly refer the reader to that work for a systematic and documented account." ]
*Ralph Wendell Burhoe: founded the journal (1966) and won the Templeton Prize in 1980.
*E.A. Burtt: wrote the book "The Metaphysical Foundations of Modern Physical Science" (1925). [ Issues in Science and Religion pp. 34, 36, 51, 77 ]
*C. A. Coulson: wrote the book "Science and Christian Belief" (1955). Ian Barbour in "Science and Religion: New Perspectives on the Dialogue" (1968) (p.xi) writes

"The problem of Part Two is the relation between religion and "the methods of science." Is the scientific method the only path to knowledge? Are theology and science similar enterprises (as Coulson and Schilling argue) or are they radically different (as Evans suggests)? Such questions about the relation of religion to science as a way of knowing are more basic than problems arising from particular scientific theories. Many persons today find that their religious beliefs are challenged not by any specific scientific discoveries but by the conviction that assertions in science can be proven while those in religion cannot. Science has been one of the influences on the "death of God" movement, as Ferre's essay indicates. Both Ferre and Evans provide careful philosophical analyses of the problem of verifying or evaluating theological statements. The central issue of Part Two, then, is the status of religious beliefs in an age of science.

*"The Similarity of Science and Religion", Charles Coulson, pages 57-77
*"The Threefold Nature of Science and Religion", Harold K. Schilling, pages 78-100
*"Differences between Scientific and Religious Asseritions, Donald D. Evans, pages 101-133
*"Science and the Death of 'God'", Frederick Ferre, pages 134-158] [ Hough, Adrian (2006). "Not a Gap in Sight: Fifty Years of Charles Coulson's Science and Christian Belief". [http://www.spck.org.uk/cat/theology.php Theology] Volume 109: pp.21-27.
"With suitable changes of language and illustration, Coulson's Science and Christian Belief could be rewritten for the present day without having to remove any of his fundamental arguments. Indeed, his obseration that the rise of science has led to a loss of tradition throughout the world is a view which is now held very widely as well as being a noted cause for concern."
]
*Freeman Dyson: wrote the book "Disturbing the Universe" (1979) and won the Templeton Prize in 2000.
*George Ellis: co-wrote the book "The Large Scale Structure of Space-Time" (1973) and won the Templeton Prize in 2004.
*Arthur Eddington: wrote the book "The Nature of the Physical World" (1928) and "Why I Believe in God: Science and Religion, as a Scientist Sees It" (1930). [ Ian Barbour, "Issues in Science and Religion" (1966), p.133, cites Arthur Eddington's "The Nature of the Physical World" (1928)--for a text that argues The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principles provides a scientific basis for "the defense of the idea of human freedom"--and his "Science and the Unseen World" (1929)--for support of philosophical idealism "the thesis that reality is basically mental" ]
*John Habgood: wrote the book "Religion and Science" (1964). [ [http://www.srforum.org/newsite/Reviews/Reviews49.pdf Reviews in Science and Religion] ]
*Charles Hartshorne: wrote the book "Philosophers Speak of God" (1953). [ Issues in Science and Religion pp. 130, 314, 334, 444, 445, 446, 447, 457 ]
*John F. Haught: wrote the book "Science and Religion--From Conflict to Conversation" (1995). [ [http://books.google.com/books?id=eyrikGwJfCsC The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science] pp. 184, 187, 189, 190, 191, 193, 196, 201, 348, 379, 690-1, 698, 898 ]
*Michał Heller: wrote the book "Creative tension essays on science and religion: Essays on Science and Religion" (2003).
*Martinez Hewlett: wrote the chapter "Molecular Biology and Religion" (pp.172-186) in the "The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science" (2006) [ [http://books.google.com/books?id=eyrikGwJfCsC The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science] Philip Clayton(ed.), Zachary Simpson(associate-ed.)--Hardcover 2006, paperback July 2008-Oxford University Press, 1023 pages ]

*Mary B. Hesse: wrote the book "Science and The Human Imagination: Aspects of the History of Logic of Physical Science" (1954). [ Arthur Peacocke, "The Sciences and Theology in the Twentieth Century", 1981, University of Notre Dame Press, ISBN 0-2680-1704-2, p. xvii, "The volume ends with a retrospective survey by my co-chairman at the Symposium, Professor Mary Hesse, together with a few comments on that survey by some of the authors." ]
*Reijer Hooykaas: wrote the book "Religion and the Rise of Modern Science" (1972) [ [http://books.google.com/books?id=eyrikGwJfCsC The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science] pp. 304-5, 306 ]
*Donald E. Knuth: wrote the book "Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About" (2001) [ Review found in Saul A. Teukolsky (Cornell University) Physics Today, April 2002, p. 81-82 ]
*Henry Margenau: co-wrote the book "Cosmos, Bios, Theos Scientists Reflect on Science, God, and the Origins of the Universe, Life, and Homo sapiens" (1992)
*E. A. Milne: wrote the book "Modern Cosmology and the Christian Idea of God" (1952). [ Ian Barbour, "Issues in Science and Religion" (1966), p.166, writes "Theories as Mental Structures (Idealism)..."The philosophical idealism exemplified by Eddington, Jeans, and Milne finds few supporters today, but a modified neo-Kantianism is found in Cassirer, Margenau, and in a somewhat different form among continental physicists such as von Weizsacker." and on page 167, "As compared with the actual practice of the scientific community, the views of Eddington and Milne neglect the experimental side, just as positivism neglects the theoretical side." ]
*Nancey Murphy co-wrote with George Ellis "On the Moral Nature of the Universe: Theology, Cosmology, and Ethics" [ editorial committee member of [http://books.google.com/books?id=eyrikGwJfCsC The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science] Philip Clayton(ed.), Zachary Simpson(associate-ed.)--Hardcover 2006, paperback July 2008-Oxford University Press, 1023 pages, page v ]
*Seyyed Hossein Nasr: wrote Islam and science (pp.71-86) in the "The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science" (2006) [ [http://books.google.com/books?id=eyrikGwJfCsC The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science] Philip Clayton(ed.), Zachary Simpson(associate-ed.)--Hardcover 2006, paperback July 2008-Oxford University Press, 1023 pages ]
*Arthur Peacocke: wrote the book "Creation and the World of Science" (1979).
*Robert T. Pennock: wrote "The Pre-modern Sins of Intelligent Design" (pp. 732-748) in "The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science" (2006) [ [http://books.google.com/books?id=eyrikGwJfCsC The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science] Philip Clayton(ed.), Zachary Simpson(associate-ed.)--Hardcover 2006, paperback July 2008-Oxford University Press, 1023 pages ]
*Michael Pupin: wrote foreword to "" (1931).
*John Polkinghorne: wrote the book "Science and Theology" (1998) and "Faith, Science and Understanding" (2000).
*William B. Provine: wrote "Evolution, Religion, and Science" (pp. 652-666) in the "The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science" (2006) [ [http://books.google.com/books?id=eyrikGwJfCsC The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science] Philip Clayton(ed.), Zachary Simpson(associate-ed.)--Hardcover 2006, paperback July 2008-Oxford University Press, 1023 pages ]
*Ian Ramsey: wrote the book "Religious Language" (1957). [Arthur Peacocke, "Science and the Christian Experiment", Oxford University Press, 1971, on page 122 writes "I.T. Ramsey has analysed the logical form of creation "ex nihilo" into the analogical model, 'creation', which is a word used of human beings making paintings, symphonies, etc. out of something or by means of something..." ] [ Ian Barbour, "Issues in Science and Religion" (1966), p. 246 writes "Theologian Ian Ramsey finds that the distinctive function of religious language is the evocation of commitment. Its logical structure is similar to that of statements about dominant personal loyalties: a man's devotion to his nation, a captain's loyalty to his ship, a man's love for his wife." ]
*Holmes Rolston: wrote the book "Science and Religion: A Critical Survey" (1987) and won the Templeton Prize in 2003.
*Norbert M. Samuelson: wrote the chapter Judaism and Science (pp. 41-56) in the "The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science" (2006) [ [http://books.google.com/books?id=eyrikGwJfCsC The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science] Philip Clayton(ed.), Zachary Simpson(associate-ed.)--Hardcover 2006, paperback July 2008-Oxford University Press, 1023 pages ]

*Nicholas Saunders: wrote the book Divine Action and Modern Science (2002).
*Harold K. Schilling: wrote the book "Science and Religion" (1962). [ Ian Barbour, "Issues in Science and Religion" (1966), p. 152 writes "The scientific community, like any group in society, has a set of attitudes which are influenced by but not identical with those of the culture at large. Schilling ["A Human Enterprise" Science, June 6, 1958, Vol. 127, p.1324] gives a vivid portrayal:

It has its own ideals and characteristic way of life; its own standards, mores, conventions, signs and symbols, language and jargon, professional ethics, sanctions and controls, authority, instituions and organizations, publications; its own creeds and beliefs, orthodoxies and heresies--and effective ways of dealing with the latter. This community is affected, as are other communities, by the usual vagaries, adequacies, and shortcomings of human beings. It has its politics, its pulling and hauling, its pressure groups; its differing schools of thought, its divisions and schisms; its personal loyalties and animosities, jealousies, hatreds, and rallying cries; its fads and fashions.
] [ Mary B. Hesse reviews his book "Science and Religion: An Interpretation of Two Communities" in Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 3, Issue 1, (Autumn, 1963), page 112-113, where she writes
"There remain however persistent, half-conscious, impressions among the religious that science is somehow a danger to true spirituality, and among the non-religious that science has once and for all refuted the claims of religion. Professor Schilling's book has the important merit of taking seriously the intellectual and social aspects of these half-conscious impressions, and of showing how mis- taken is the belief that science and religion can go their separate ways in utter disregard of each other. ...reading this book no one ought to doubt that the stereotypes described at the outset are not merely caricatures, but serious distortions. But still the synthetic view which is surely the aim of the book somehow fails to come across with the requisite punch. Is this because yet deeper issues remain to be discussed? Can the claim of Christianity to be based on experience in a way parallel to science really be sustained? And if not, then what is its relation to expe- rience? And what about the vexed question of religious language?"
]
*Russell Stannard [ Hough, Adrian (2006). "Not a Gap in Sight: Fifty Years of Charles Coulson's Science and Christian Belief". [http://www.spck.org.uk/cat/theology.php Theology] Volume 109: pp.21-27.
"the debate on the relationship between science and ...theology. Arthur Peacock, Russell Stnanard and John Poliinghorne are the three most bovious names who have followed in his footsteps."
]
*Richard Swinburne: wrote the book "The Existence of God" (1st Ed. 1979, 2nd Ed. 2004).
*Pierre Teilhard de Chardin: wrote the book "Science and Christ" (1965, English Translation).
*Charles Hard Townes: wrote the article “The Convergence of Science and Religion” (1966) published in the IBM journal "Think" and won the Templeton Prize in 2005.
*B. Alan Wallace: wrote the chapter Buddhism and Science (pp. 24-40) in the "The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science" (2006) [ [http://books.google.com/books?id=eyrikGwJfCsC The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science] Philip Clayton(ed.), Zachary Simpson(associate-ed.)--Hardcover 2006, paperback July 2008-Oxford University Press, 1023 pages ]

Famous scientists who have notable science and religion works yet have never been mentioned or have never submitted their work in the Oxford Handbook or in Zygon

*Henry F. Schaefer, III: wrote the book "Science and Christianity: Conflict or Coherence?" (2003)
*Gerald Schroeder: nuclear physicist and author of several books attempting to reconcile science with religion (primarily from an Orthodox Jewish perspective), such as "The Science of God: The Convergence of Scientific and Biblical Wisdom."

ee also

*List of 1930's 'science-and-religion dialogue' participants
*Religion and science community
*List of Christian thinkers in science
*Relationship between religion and science

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Science and religion in the Czech lands and Slovakia — Historical backdrop The field of “science and religion” (for lack of a better term; to denote that it is a single notion, we shall use the abbreviation “S R”) has a (relatively) long history in the Czech lands and Slovakia. The census of 1910… …   Wikipedia

  • Issues in Science and Religion — (1966) is a book by Ian Barbour, originally published by Prentice Hall. A biography provided by the John Templeton Foundation and published by PBS online states this book has been credited with literally creating the contemporary field of science …   Wikipedia

  • International Society for Science and Religion — The International Society for Science and Religion (ISSR) is a learned society established in 2001 for the purpose of the promotion of education through the support of inter disciplinary learning and research in the fields of science and religion …   Wikipedia

  • Science and the Church — • Dicsusses the relationship between the two subjects Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Science and the Church     Science and the Church      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Science and mathematics from the Renaissance to Descartes — George Molland Early in the nineteenth century John Playfair wrote for the Encyclopaedia Britannica a long article entitled ‘Dissertation; exhibiting a General View of the Progress of Mathematics and Physical Science, since the Revival of Letters …   History of philosophy

  • List of modern-day Muslim scholars of Islam — This article is a ist of modern day (20th to 21st century) scholars of Islam who are themselves Muslim. Geographical categories have been created based on commonalities in culture and language across the Muslim World. Non Scholars (i.e. prominent …   Wikipedia

  • List of primary and secondary sources on the Cold War — Because of the extent of the Cold War (in terms of time and scope), the conflict is well documented. Following are scholarly books and articles in English. Contents 1 Overviews 2 National perspectives 2.1 Soviet 2.2 Ameri …   Wikipedia

  • List of religions and spiritual traditions — The following is a list of religions and spiritual traditions, however it excludes modern religions, which can be found in list of new religious movements.Abrahamic religions A group of monotheistic traditions sometimes grouped with one another… …   Wikipedia

  • Outline of military science and technology — See also: Index of military science and technology articles The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to military science: Military science – study of the technique, psychology, practice and other phenomena which… …   Wikipedia

  • Timeline of Islamic science and engineering — This timeline of Islamic science and engineering covers the general development of science and technology in the Islamic world during the Islamic Golden Age, usually dated from the 7th to 16th centuries.From the 17th century onwards, the advances …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.