List of Pokémon (1–51)


List of Pokémon (1–51)

Contents

Pokémon has 649[1][2][3][4] (as of Pokémon Black and White) distinctive fictional species classified as the titular Pokémon.[1] These creatures and entities reside throughout various locations of the fictional Pokémon universe and can be caught by humans designated as Pokémon Trainers often using devices called Poké Balls. These trainers use Pokémon for a variety of purposes, such as being pets and loyal companions and/or being pitted against other trained Pokémon in competitive Pokémon battles.[5] Pokémon are potentially super-powered creatures that can employ a variety of talents such as generating fire or heat, martial arts, telekinesis, and so on. Through experience, items, or trading, many of these species undergo a metamorphosis and transform into a similar but stronger species in a process referred to as Pokémon evolution.[6]

This is a selected listing of fifty-one of the Pokémon species, arranged as they are in the main game series' National Pokédex.[1]

Bulbasaur

Number: 001[1] Type: Grass/Poison[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Ivysaur[1]

Bulbasaur, the Seed Pokémon, known in Japan as Fushigidane (フシギダネ?), are small, squat reptilian and frog Pokémon that move on all four legs, and have light blue-green bodies with darker blue-green spots. As a Bulbasaur undergoes evolution into Ivysaur and then later into Venusaur, the bulb on its back blossoms into a large flower.[7] The seed on a Bulbasaur's back is planted at birth, and then sprouts and grows larger as the Bulbasaur grows.[8] The bulb absorbs sunlight which makes it grow. For this reason, Bulbasaur enjoy soaking up the sun's rays,[9] and can survive for days without eating because the bulb stores energy.[10] In the Pokémon anime, the character Ash Ketchum has a Bulbasaur who is portrayed as being brave but also stubborn. The distinctive differences of Bulbasaur from other Pokémon such as Diglett are well understood by children and so motivate their play and trading of the creature.[11]

Ivysaur

Number: 002[1] Type: Grass/ Poison[1] Evolves from: Bulbasaur[1] Evolves into: Venusaur[1]

Ivysaur, known in Japan as Fushigisou (フシギソウ?) is the evolved form of Bulbasaur, which it may take upon reaching level 16.[1] Aside from becoming taller and heavier then Bulbasaur, its trademark bulb becomes a pink flower bud, and four leaves now appear at the base of this bud. The Pokémon's legs are more stout, allowing it to hold up the bigger bulb, yet limiting its previous ability to stand on its hind legs.[12] Eventually, the bud will give off a sweet scent, a signal that it will bloom soon, and that its host will evolve. An Ivysaur will spend more time bathing in sunlight in order to reach evolution.[13]

Venusaur

Number: 003[1] Type: Grass/Poison[1] Evolves from: Ivysaur[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Venusaur, known in Japan as Fushigibana (フシギバナ?), is the Seed Pokémon. It is the final stage in Bulbasaur evolution. The seed finally bloomed into a huge flower, vaguely resembling a Rafflesia. The flower constantly draws in sunlight for nutrition, characterized by vivid colors and a soothing aroma, and power, which is much more substantial in the summer.[14][15] They are always on the move to absorb more sunlight, though they usually remain quiet and still while absorbing it.[16] After it rains, the aroma is much stronger, which attracts other Pokémon.[17]

Charmander

Number: 004[1] Type: Fire[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Charmeleon[1]

Charmander, known as Hitokage (ヒトカゲ?) first appeared in the video games Pokémon Red and Blue and subsequent sequels, later appearing in various merchandise, spinoff titles and animated and printed adaptations of the franchise. Charmander is known as the Lizard Pokémon. Charmander are small, bipedal lizard-like Pokémon. Most have blue eyes, red-orange skin, three-clawed toes, yellow bellies, and yellow soles under its feet. The end of a Charmander's tail is alight with a flame, and the flame's size reflects both the physical health[18] and the emotions of the individual.[19] When it rains, steam is said to spout from the tip of its tail.[20] If the flame were to ever go out, the Charmander would die.[21] When Charmander receives enough experience from battles, it evolves into Charmeleon, and later Charizard.

Charmeleon

Number: 005[1] Type: Fire[1] Evolves from: Charmander[1] Evolves into: Charizard[1]

Charmeleon, known in Japan as Lizardo (リザード Rizādo?), is the evolved form of Charmander, and the pre-evolved form of Charizard. Charmeleon, known as the Flame Pokémon, are bipedal lizard Pokémon, that have yellow bellies and soles, three clawed feet and hands, and bear a flame at the end of their tails. They are darker-skinned than Charmander, now possess a bumpy horn on their heads, and take on a more intimidating appearance. Indeed, Charmeleon are excessively savage and short-tempered by nature,[22] and they are powerful fighters due to their temperament. The flame on its tail may burn a bluish white when the Pokémon is excited,[23] and the air temperature often raises to very high levels when the tail flame is waved around.[24]

Charizard

Number: 006[1] Type: Fire[1]/ Flying[1] Evolves from: Charmeleon[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Charizard, known in Japan as Lizardon (リザードン Rizādon?), is the evolved form of Charmeleon, which is the evolved form of Charmander. Whereas its pre-evolutions Charmander and Charmeleon are ground-bound lizard like creatures, Charizard resembles a large traditional European dragon.[25] Despite the resemblance, Charizard is explicitly a Fire/Flying-type, not a Dragon-type.[26] Charizard have two wings that are blue, while the back is orange, as with the most of its body. Its belly and soles are cream-colored, while their eyes are light blue in color. The video games describe Charizard as having wings that can carry them close to an altitude of 4,600 feet,[27] flying proudly around the sky and constantly seeking for powerful opponents to quarrel with.[28] They can breathe intense flames that can melt any material, but will never torch a weaker foe.[29] If Charizard become angry, the flame at the tip of their tail can flare up in a whitish-blue color.[30] Because of their reckless behavior, Charizard are known to unintentionally cause wildfires.[31]

Squirtle

Number: 007[1] Type: Water[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Wartortle[1]

Squirtle, known as Zenigame (ゼニガメ?) in Japan, is the Tiny Turtle Pokémon. They are cute-looking turtle Pokémon, capable of moving either on two feet or on all fours. Their skin is a light blue, and they possess a long, curled tail. When feeling threatened, Squirtle withdraw their limbs into their brown-orange shells and spray water from their mouth with great force, either to attack their opponent or merely to intimidate it.[32] If attacked anyway, their shells are extremely resilient, and provide excellent protection. It shelters itself in its shell, then strikes back with spouts of water at every opportunity.[33] Squirtle's shell is not merely used for protection. The shell's rounded shape and the grooves on its surface help minimize resistance in water, enabling this Pokémon to swim at high speeds.[34]

Wartortle

Number: 008[1] Type: Water[1] Evolves from: Squirtle [1] Evolves into: Blastoise[1]

Wartortle (カメール Kamēru?, Kameil), known as the Turtle Pokémon, is the evolved form of Squirtle.[1] It has a slightly more intimidating appearance; aside from an increased height and weight, it now has darker skin, possesses meaner eyes with smaller pupils, and bears two small outer fangs. Its shell may receive battle scars, from battles that these Pokémon more willingly seek out.[35] A Wartortle also gets a pair of feathery ears, and its tail becomes white, fluffy, and too long to completely hide within its shell;[36] these appendages greatly aid this Pokémon in swimming, acting as oars and/or fins.[37] The tail also happens to be a highly valued collectors' item, which has caused people to hunt this Pokémon, dwindling their numbers. The reason for such poaching may very well be that a Wartortle tail is a symbol of longevity in the Pokémon world, supposedly allowing the creature to live for thousands of years.[38]

In the anime, the first appearance of a Wartortle is when a wild one runs into Ash Ketchum and his friends on Cinnabar Island, seeking help for its clan of Squirtle, Wartortle, and a leading Blastoise, all mysteriously stricken with sleepiness.[39] More Wartortle appear as firefighting Pokémon, and Ash's Squirtle, being an honorary firefighter of its hometown, forms a rivalry with the leader. Finally, another of Ash's traveling companions, May received her own Squirtle from Professor Oak in The Right Place and the Right Mime. May's Squirtle was very young and timid, until evolving before Staging a Heroes Welcome . In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Green had a Wartortle, which had evolved from a Squirtle she stole from Professor Oak. Just like Green, it also has a tricky personality. It has since evolved into Blastoise.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston compared it to Ivysaur and Charmeleon, describing it as a pit stop to a more powerful Pokémon.[40]

Blastoise

Number: 009[1] Type: Water[1] Evolves from: Wartortle[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Blastoise, known in Japan as Kamex (カメックス Kamekkusu?), is the Shellfish Pokémon, and the final stage in Squirtle evolution. It takes on an appearance radically different from its previous forms; the most obvious change is the addition of two retractable cannons on its shell. It is also a girthier and more imposing figure: the shape of its head is completely reformed; its limbs are now stout and segmented, bearing visible claws; and its once sought-after tail is short and somewhat stubby. The afore-mentioned cannon spouts are remarkable adaptations, allowing a Blastoise to shoot water with great power and accuracy. The jets of water it spouts from the rocket cannons on its shell can punch through thick steel,[41] while their bullets of water can precisely nail tin cans from a distance of over 160 feet.[42] The spouts also allow for high-speed tackles.[43] Despite being large and heavy, Blastoise can still move well on either two legs or all fours. Blastoise can be found living on island beaches near the ocean, but their preferred habitat seems to be freshwater ponds and lakes.

Caterpie

Number: 010[1] Type: Bug[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Metapod[1]

Caterpie (キャタピー Kyatapī?), known as the "worm" Pokémon, was based on the design of the caterpillar of the Swallowtail butterfly. Caterpie has green skin with a yellow underbelly, yellow spots, and large red osmeterium protruding from its forehead. Their green bodies are useful for camouflage in foliage,[44] their eyes are patterned to scare away predators,[45] their suction-cup feet allow them to climb any surface,[46] and the osmeterium on their heads can project a horrid stench to repel predators.[47] Caterpie is the smallest of all the original Pokémon, and grows in size by shedding its skin. Eventually, Caterpie evolves into Metapod, and then Butterfree.

Metapod

Number: 011[1] Type: Bug[1] Evolves from: Caterpie[1] Evolves into: Butterfree[1]

Metapod (トランセル Toranseru?), known as the Cocoon Pokémon, are pupal Pokémon found in the wild early in the Kanto and Johto regions, of which its larval form is the caterpillar-like Caterpie. They can evolve into the butterfly-like Butterfree. While Metapod is classified as a cocoon Pokémon, it bears more resemblance to a chrysalis. A Metapod's exterior is regularly hardened to protect its soft and tender innards while undergoing metamorphosis to eventually become a Butterfree.[48] To conserve energy for this event, the Metapod barely moves.[49] While this shell is said to be as hard as steel, a large sudden impact could cause its vulnerable body to pop out, leaving it completely exposed.[50]

Butterfree

Number: 012[1] Type: Bug[1]/ Flying[1] Evolves from: Metapod[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Butterfree (バタフリー Batafurī?), known as the Butterfly Pokémon, are fully developed, butterfly-like Pokémon that have hatched from their pupal Metapod forms. Whereas many other Pokémon evolve into their final forms at much later levels, Butterfree's early availability makes it a temporarily strong asset to Pokémon Trainers starting out on their journeys. Butterfree resembles a vaguely anthropomorphic butterfly. Unlike true insects, it only has four legs, which are a pale blue color. It has a nose-like structure which is a similar color. Its body’s coloration is a darker purple-blue. It has large veined wings which are white with black markings. These markings can help distinguish male and female individuals. It has large compound eyes which tend to be a reddish color. Butterfree feed on honey from flowers, and they rub the honey onto the hairs on their legs to transport the honey back to their nests.[51] Like members of the order Lepidoptera, Butterfree’s wings are covered in fine scales that are water-repellant and allow it to fly in heavy rains,[52] something many other insect Pokémon such as Masquerain cannot do, and Butterfree wings are coated in toxic dust that can be shot at an opponent in battle through wing flapping.[53]

Weedle

Number: 013[1] Type: Bug[1]/ Poison[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Kakuna[1]

Kakuna

Number: 014[1] Type: Bug[1]/ Poison[1] Evolves from: Weedle[1] Evolves into: Beedrill[1]

Beedrill

Number: 015[1] Type: Bug[1]/ Poison[1] Evolves from: Kakuna[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Pidgey

Number: 016[1] Type: Normal[1]/ Flying[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Pidgeotto[1]

Pidgeotto

Number: 017[1] Type: Normal[1]/ Flying[1] Evolves from: Pidgey[1] Evolves into: Pidgeot[1]

Pidgeot

Number: 018[1] Type: Normal[1]/ Flying[1] Evolves from: Pidgeotto[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Rattata

Number: 019[1] Type: Normal[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Raticate[1]

Raticate

Number: 020[1] Type: Normal[1] Evolves from: Rattata[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Raticate (ラッタ?, Ratta), known as the Mouse Pokémon, is a larger and stronger form that Rattata takes when it gains enough experience.[1] Raticate resemble large light brown rats with small black eyes, a yellow belly, a large cream coloured tail and the ability to stand on its hind legs. In the main Pokémon game series, a Raticate is only acquired when a Rattata grows past experience level 20 and is evolved into a Raticate.[1] Compared to a Rattata, a Raticate is far more of a predator, and the majority of its features are adapted for this purpose. Its whiskers give it balance and it slows down if they are cut off.[54] A female always has shorter whiskers. Its webbed feet allow it to swim as it hunts prey,[55] and its fangs are tough enough to topple concrete buildings by gnawing on them.[56]

On the S.S. Anne, Ash traded his Butterfree for a Raticate but traded back towards the end of the episode. Cassidy has a Raticate that for a time served in her and Butch's motto the role that Meowth serves in the motto of Jessie and James. In Showdown at Dark City, Raticate is one of the Pokémon belonging to one of the Trainers at Kas Gym. Mollie has a Raticate she used during the appeals round of the Gardenia Town contest in What I Did for Love. Butch of Team Rocket used a Raticate in The Ole' Berate and Switch. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, a Rattata was Yellow's first Pokémon. It later evolved into a Raticate.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston praised Raticate as a great Pokémon early in the game, but criticized it for losing its usefulness later in the game.[57] While she found it to be a Pokémon that has difficulties later in the game, IGN's "Pokémon of the Day Chick" called Raticate a "nasty surprise" for opponents.[58] She also called Raticate "one of the single most underrated Pokemon in existence".[58] 1UP.com's Michael Vreeland commented that Raticate's "Super Fang" technique was annoying for players when another trainer had it use it on their Pokémon.[59] IGN wrote that while it has the same problems as Rattata does, it has a high attack power.[60]

Spearow

Number: 021[1] Type: Normal[1]/ Flying[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Fearow[1]

Spearow (オニスズメ?, Onisuzume) are known as the Tiny Bird Pokémon. Their US names come from the words "spear" and "sparrow." When they are trained to Level 20, they can evolve into Fearow. Spearow are very small birds with rough plumage. They have the beak shape similar to that of raptors. Their pink feet each have three talons. They are noted for being frail, for which they make up for with their "Mirror Move" ability.[61] They eat insects in grassy areas by flushing them out with their stubby wings, and plucking at them with their beaks.[62] A Spearow's wings aren't good for long distance travel or high flying,[63] but one is able to fly at high speeds by flapping its wings very rapidly.[64] Spearow are very territorial, constantly buzzing about and calling with a loud cry that can be heard from half a mile away. This cry serves to scare away predators and to keep in touch with other Spearow, though the latter is reserved as an alarm to its kind.[65]

In the very first episode of the animated series (Pokémon, I Choose You!), series protagonist Ash Ketchum attempts to capture a Spearow right outside his hometown, Pallet Town, without his Pikachu's help; he only angers the Pokémon by hurling a pebble at it. Spearow calls out to its large flock, which pursue Ash and Pikachu. Pikachu eventually disperses the flock with massive Thunder, upon witnessing Ash's willingness to sacrifice his safety for Pikachu's.[66] Ash must deal with the flock once more when he returns to Pallet Town, and realizes the Fearow leading the flock had been the Spearow he tried to catch.[67] The flock reappeared in a flashback to that episode Ash had in Lucario and the Mystery of Mew. Professor Oak had a Spearow in the Pokémon Adventures manga. He used it against Green in their Pokémon League battle. It later evolved into Fearow.

Fearow

Number: 022[1] Type: Normal[1]/ Flying[1] Evolves from: Spearow[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Fearow (オニドリル Onidoriru?, Onidrill), known as the Beak Pokémon, is a bird Pokémon that evolves from Spearow at level 20.[1] Fearow is a large cormorant-like bird with a vulture-like neck. It has a large, long pointed beak and a red crown-like line of spikes upon its head. It also bears huge wings. All characteristics being a radical departure from its short-winged, stubby-beaked pre-evolved form Spearow. Fearow uses its great wings to catch air currents[68] and effortlessly glide over large distances for as long as a day without having to land or rest.[69] It flies high into the sky, and swoops down at its prey.[70] By using a combination of its neck and beak, it has a large reach, allowing it to pluck bugs from the ground or easily pluck prey from soil or water as it swoops down.[71] If it senses danger, it avoids it if possible.

In the animated series, the most notable Fearow is a leader of a flock of Spearow in Pallet Town, and attempts to drive away all the Pidgey in the area. Ash makes a stand against the Fearow, and realizes that it bears a grudge against him; it was the Spearow that Ash attempted to capture in the very first episode. Ash's Pidgeotto fights the Fearow, defeating it when it evolves into Pidgeot.[67] In the Electric Tale of Pikachu manga, Fearow is the first Pokémon Ash catches; similar to the first episode of the anime, Ash and Pikachu flee from angry Spearow, and when Ash protects Pikachu from harm, Pikachu dispatches the flock. Ash decides to take advantage of the situation, and catches the flock's leader, Fearow. Professor Oak had a Spearow in the Pokémon Adventures manga, which later evolved into Fearow.

GamesRadar editor Brett Elston stated that while Fearow lacks the popularity of Pidgeot, it becomes more powerful more quickly.[72]

Ekans

Number: 023[1] Type: Poison[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Arbok[1]

Arbok

Number: 024[1] Type: Poison[1] Evolves from: Ekans[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Pikachu

Number: 025[1] Type: Electric[1] Evolves from: Pichu (Happiness)[1] Evolves into: Raichu (Thunder Stone)[1]

Raichu

Number: 026[1] Type: Electric[1] Evolves from: Pikachu (Thunder Stone)[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Sandshrew

Number: 027[1] Type: Ground[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Sandslash[1]

Sandshrew (サンド Sando?, Sand), known as the Mouse Pokémon, are a species of brick-skinned mouse-like Pokémon found in several regions throughout the Pokémon world. Despite its name, Sandshrew's appearance borrows more from the armadillo or the pangolin than from the shrew; its primary means of defense when threatened is to instantly curl up its body into a ball, leaving only its tough skin exposed. When it is rolled up like this, Sandshrew has the potential to withstand many attacks, as well as being dropped from a great height (also similar to hedgehogs). Sandshrew's natural environment is buried in the sand in arid, sandy locations with very little moisture, such as a desert. It chooses this habitat to keep its hide as dry and tough as possible, while the sand also provides it with good camouflage.

In keeping with its physical characteristics, Sandshrew has high Defense in the video games, but low Speed. From Ruby and Sapphire onwards, it has the ability Sand Veil,[1] which increases its evasion during a sandstorm. Sandshrew also appears in the spin-off game Pokémon Snap. In Pokémon Stadium, Sandshrew featured in its own mini game called "Dig! Dig! Dig!", in which players need to dig to the underground well before the others.

A Sandshrew owned by A.J. is featured in the eighth anime episode, "The Path to the Pokémon League." It had many notable traits, such as the ability to withstand water and its knowledge of Fissure, which it used to dispatch Team Rocket. A.J. and his Sandshrew appear as a cameo in Pokémon Yellow.

Sandslash

Number: 028[1] Type: Ground[1] Evolves from: Sandshrew[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Sandslash (サンドパン Sandopan?, Sandpan), known as the Mouse Pokémon, are a larger and stronger form that Sandshrew take when they gain enough experience to reach level 22.[1] Generally they are a moderately large, bipedal hedgehog or pangolin-like creature with hard yellow skin, lengthy claws, and a back loaded with an assemblage of large brown spikes. These spikes are hardened sections of Sandslash’s hide that grow to form a natural self-defense when Sandslash curls into a ball. Each spike remains on Sandslash for one year, after which it falls off and a new spike grows in its place. Sandslash can be found in desert areas, particularly close to dry forests. Sandslash' spikes serve a number of purposes to help cope with its environment, such as providing shade to protect it from the sun and heatstroke or using them offensively to harm both predators and prey. It uses its claws to climb trees, cut up food and dig, the latter being an activity that can cause them to break if done too quickly. It cannot run very quickly, but it is very quick with its claws.

Nidoran♀

Number: 029[1] Type: Poison[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Nidorina[1]

Nidoran♀ (ニドラン♀ Nidoran Mesu?), known as the Poison Mouse Pokémon, are a species of poisonous mouse-like Pokémon found in the Kanto, Johto, and Sinnoh regions of the Pokémon world. Male Nidoran are classified as a separate species of Pokémon from the females due to differences in appearance between genders, such as the female being blue, instead of purple, and having smaller horns than the male. It should be noted that these were the first Pokémon to have known genders until the release of Pokémon Gold and Silver, although they remain as separate species to this date. This Pokémon protects itself with its venomous barbs. A female Nidoran birth is about 15 times more likely than a male one. However Nidoran♀ and Nidoran♂ cannot be bred together in the games, the same rule applies to their evolutions.

Nidorina

Number: 030[1] Type: Poison[1] Evolves from: Nidoran♀[1] Evolves into: Nidoqueen (Moon Stone)[1]

Nidorina (ニドリーナ Nidorīna?), known as the Poison Pin Pokémon, is comparatively larger than its pre-evolution, though she loses the forehead horn, whiskers, and incisor teeth. Nidorina is turquoise in coloration, with a pale underside. Nidorina's poison spikes are larger, and retract when they are relaxed.[73] She has also gained the ability to stand on her hind legs. Nidorina is the female equivalent of Nidorino. This is shown even in its name, which ends in a as opposed to o in Nidorino. A is traditionally a feminine vowel in the English language, particularly at the ends of names.

Nidorina seems to be more docile and relaxed than her counterpart Nidorino.[74] She is a caring mother, chewing food for her young.[75] Although she would rather not attack at all, she prefers attacks like clawing and biting.[76] She seems to display close family bonds with others of her own kind, and becomes nervous when separated.[77] However, when angered, a Nidorina can become a formidable foe, able to emit ultrasonic cries to confuse opponents.[78] Nidorina live in expansive hot savannas and plains, sharing their home range with Nidorino. They are common in Kanto, but rare in Sinnoh.

Emily's Nidoran♀, nicknamed Maria evolved into Nidorina after battling Team Rocket and kissing Ralph's Nidoran♂, nicknamed Tony, in Wherefore Art Thou, Pokémon?. Gym Leader Whitney has a Nidorina, which was easily defeated by Ash's Cyndaquil in their Gym Battle. Green had a Nidoran♀ in Pokémon Adventures that evolved into a Nidorina. She later evolved into a Nidoqueen.

Nidoqueen

Number: 031[1] Type: Poison[1]/ Ground[1] Evolves from: Nidorina (Moon Stone)[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Nidoqueen (ニドクイン Nidokuin?), known as the Drill Pokémon, are a fully grown and developed species of possum-like Pokémon. In the main Pokémon game series, a Nidoqueen can only be acquired when a Moon Stone item is applied to a Nidorina so that the creature is evolved into a Nidoqueen. Nidoqueen seem to be omnivores feeding on shrubs and fruit but they may snack on certain small Pokémon for protein. Also, Nidoqueen are much less aggressive than Nidoking and get along much better with others of their kind. Nidoqueen appears to be slightly weaker, but significantly more intelligent than Nidoking.

One of the most notable Nidoqueens in the Pokémon games is the one owned by Giovanni, the leader of Team Rocket in Pokémon Red and Blue, as well as its remakes, FireRed and LeafGreen. However, he did not use his Nidoqueen or Nidoking until he was battled as the Gym Leader of the Viridian City gym.

Nidoran♂

Number: 032[1] Type: Poison[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Nidorino[1]

Nidoran♂ (ニドラン♂ Nidoran Osu?), known as the Poison Mouse Pokémon, are a species of poisonous rabbit-like Pokémon found in the Kanto, Johto, and Sinnoh regions of the Pokémon world. Unlike most Pokémon, female Nidoran are classified as a separate species from the males due to extreme differences in appearance between genders, such as the male having larger horns and completely different colors than the female. Male Nidoran are purple, and their horns secrete a powerful venom. The size of the horns determines the potency of the venom. Nidoran stiffens its large ears to sense danger. Male Nidoran are born far less frequently, and so the group will try to protect their future bull more so than an expendable cow.

The name Nidoran♂ derives from Nido (二度?), the Japanese word for "two times" or "two degrees," indicating the differences between the genders of the species. Nīdoru (ニードル?) is also the Japanized pronunciation of "needle", which Nidoran are covered in. "Ran" may derive from the Pacarana, a South American rodent.

Nidorino

Number: 033[1] Type: Poison[1] Evolves from: Nidoran♂[1] Evolves into: Nidoking (Moon Stone)[1]

Nidorino (ニドリーノ Nidorīno?), known as the Poison Pin Pokémon, are a larger and stronger form that Nidoran♂ take when they gain enough experience.[1] Nidorino look somewhat like a rhinoceros and a rabbit with needles and horns covering its body. Nidorino is more aggressive than Nidoran♂ and is quick to attack when it notices a threat; its large ears are always on the lookout. The diamond-hard horn on its head secretes a powerful venom and on impact with an enemy, poison leaks out. If it senses a hostile presence, all the barbs on its back bristle up. Nidorino is the male counterpart of Nidorina.

In the main Pokémon game series, a Nidorino can be found as wild Pokémon in the Kanto and Johto regions of the Pokémon world, and it can also be acquired when a Nidoran♂ grows past experience level 16 and is evolved into a Nidorino. It is also notable for being one of the first two Pokémon seen in the anime and in the intro to the game Pokémon Red.

Nidoking

Number: 034[1] Type: Poison[1]/ Ground[1] Evolves from: Nidorino (Moon Stone)[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Nidoking (ニドキング Nidokingu?), known as the Drill Pokémon, are a fully grown and developed species of male possum-like Pokémon and the final stage in the Nidoran♂ evolutionary line.[1] Its horn is hard enough to pierce a diamond and contains secreted venom, making it a powerful stabbing tool upon prey and Pokémon battle opponents. Nidoking have immense upper-body strength, being able to snap a telephone pole like a dry twig. It uses its tail to smash down its target, then constrict it to break its bones. Its thick tail packs enormously destructive power capable of felling a metal transmission tower. Once a Nidoking goes on a rampage, nothing can be done to stop it. There are far fewer Nidoking than Nidoqueen in the anime. They serve as leaders of herds, with multiple Nidoqueen mates.

In the main Pokémon game series, a Nidoking can only be acquired when a Moon Stone item is applied to a Nidorino so that the creature is evolved into a Nidoking. They are the masculine equivalent to Nidoqueen. Nidoking are more primal, fighting other Nidoking for such matters as territory or food (or a Nidoqueen, during mating season). One of the most notable Nidokings in the Pokémon games is the one owned by Giovanni, the leader of Team Rocket in Pokémon Red and Blue, as well as its remakes, FireRed and LeafGreen. However, he did not use his Nidoqueen or Nidoking until he was battled as the Gym Leader of the Viridian City gym.

In a poll conducted by IGN, it was voted as the 42nd best Pokémon, where the staff commented on how Nidoking does not have a crown. They further stated that "Maybe in Generation VI he’ll finally get the adornments befitting a king".[79]

Clefairy

Number: 035[1] Type: Normal[1] Evolves from: Cleffa (Happiness)[1] Evolves into: Clefable (Moon Stone)[1]

Clefable

Number: 036[1] Type: Normal[1] Evolves from: Clefairy (Moon Stone)[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Clefable (ピクシー Pikushī?, Pixy), known as the Fairy Pokémon, is similar to Clefairy in appearance. It is larger than its pre-evolved form, with prominent ears and a pair of jagged wings on its back. Clefable inhabit remote mountainous areas and generally any environment that has sufficiently little ambient noise. Clefable’s hearing is extremely sensitive – it is said that it can discern the sound of a pin falling 1,100 yards (1,000 m) away, so it is averse to living in areas with sound pollution (compare with Whismur).

Clefable are also extremely timid, and rarely seen in the wild. They avoid all contact with outsiders. Even sensing the presence of others in the area (which is fairly easy thanks to their prodigious hearing) will cause it to run and hide immediately. They will, however, come into the open on quiet, moonlit nights to take a stroll on a lake.

Clefable’s wings are probably not fit for real flight, but they allow it to move in a skipping, bouncy manner as if it were walking on the moon's surface. They can even walk across the water’s surface this way, so when it takes the aforementioned stroll on the lake, it literally takes a stroll on the lake. Clefable’s wings, its hovering walk, its timidity and elusiveness have led them to be categorized as a type of fairy in the Pokémon world.

Vulpix

Number: 037[1] Type: Fire[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Ninetales (Fire Stone)[1]

Ninetales

Number: 038[1] Type: Fire[1] Evolves from: Vulpix (Fire Stone)[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Jigglypuff

Number: 039[1] Type: Normal[1] Evolves from: Igglybuff (Happiness)[1] Evolves into: Wigglytuff (Moon Stone)[1]

Wigglytuff

Number: 040[1] Type: Normal[1] Evolves from: Jigglypuff (Moon Stone)[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Zubat

Number: 041[1] Type: Poison[1]/ Flying[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Golbat[1]

Golbat

Number: 042[1] Type: Poison[1]/ Flying[1] Evolves from: Zubat[1] Evolves into: Crobat[1]

Oddish

Number: 043[1] Type: Grass[1]/ Poison[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Gloom[1]

Gloom

Number: 044[1] Type: Grass[1]/ Poison[1] Evolves from: Oddish[1] Evolves into: Vileplume/Bellossom[1]

Vileplume

Number: 045[1] Type: Grass/Poison[1] Evolves from: Gloom[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Paras

Number: 046[1] Type: Bug/Grass[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Parasect[1]

Paras (パラス Parasu?) is a basic parasite-like Pokémon that has two mushrooms on its back. Paras can be found in some caves and the Safari Zone in Kanto and in Ilex Forest and the Bug Catching Contest in Johto.

Paras is born with tiny spores covering their body, which grow into tochukaso mushrooms as the Pokémon feeds. It is noted in that the relationship between the host and the mushrooms is a symbiotic relationship: the mushrooms will sap energy from the host, causing the Paras to continuously burrow underground in forest areas to gnaw on tree roots, since the tochukaso draws most of the energy from the roots. In return, the mushrooms defend the host by spraying toxic spores at enemies. The mushrooms themselves have strong healing properties, and are valued for their life extending properties.

Parasect

Number: 047[1] Type: Bug/Grass[1] Evolves from: Paras[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Parasect (パラセクト Parasekuto?) is a larger and stronger evolution of Paras[1] that has one large mushroom on its back instead of two (see Paras). The mushroom has completely taken over the bug host. Parasect resides in dark and damp places, a preference of the mushroom, not the bug. The mushroom also has numerous medicinal qualities. Parasect can be obtained when a Paras reaches level 24. Parasect can be found in the Cerulean Cave and Safari Zone in Kanto and Silver Cave in Crystal. The Japanese and English names are a portmanteau of the English words "parasite" and "insect".it is deeply related with the mushrooms in its back para sect is the the mushroom's host so in-place the mushroom gives it spore which paralyzes it enemy on contact

IGN listed Parasect as one of the best Bug types, alongside Scyther. While they praise its ability to use status-altering techniques, they bemoaned its lack of Bug attacks, aside from Leech Life.[80]


Venonat

Number: 048[1] Type: Bug/Poison[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Venomoth[1]

Venonat (コンパン Konpan?, Compoun), known as the Insect Pokémon, is a fairly common, dark purple, gnat-like Pokémon. Venonat has a round body covered in purple fur, which oozes poison.[81] It has a pair of clodhopper feet and stubby forepaws. Venonat has a pincer-like mouth, red compound eyes, and white antennae. Venonat has highly developed eyes, which act as a radar to help find suitable prey.[82] The small bugs it catches and eats appear only at night, so it sleeps in a hole in a tree until night falls.[83] Venonat’s prey and Venonat itself are both attracted by bright light.[83] Venonat live in dense forests with lots of undergrowth and little light. It is most common in Kanto and Johto with occasional sightings in Sinnoh.

Tracey Sketchit has a Venonat which he commonly uses to see things at night with. Koga and Aya of Fuchsia City both have a Venonat. Koga's instantly evolved into a Venomoth in The Ninja Poké-Showdown when it was sent out to battle Ash.

GameDaily ranked Venonat third on their list of the "Top 10 Weirdest Looking Pokémon", stating "Pokémon should be cuddly. Pokémon should have faces with big cheery smiles. They should not resemble bugs with blood-red eyeballs that suggest they carry disease."[84] GamesRadar however praised the character, stating while its appearance would imply worthlessness, to the point that around their offices "Venonat fan" was an insult, its attacks showed otherwise and made it a versatile character.[85] A theory exists that Butterfree and the Pokémon Venonat were once to be related; GamesRadar's Carolyn Gudmundson stated that their faces and hands were identical and looked more similar than Venonat does to its evolution Venomoth. She theorized that the developers may have mixed up the families due to Metapod being so similar to Venomoth. Another GamesRadar editor commented that Venomoth seemed diverged from Venonat.[86]

Venomoth

Number: 049[1] Type: Bug/Poison[1] Evolves from: Venonat[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Venomoth (モルフォン Morufon?, Morphon) is a large, lavender, moth-like Pokémon. It is rare in the wild, but can also be obtained by raising the more common Venonat to level 31.[1] Its wings are covered in extremely toxic, dust-like scales. These scales are color-coded to indicate the effect they will have upon coming into contact with a living creature, darker colours meaning poison, and lighter colours meaning paralysis. Venomoth is similar to Butterfree in that they both flap their wings to release toxic powders. However, Venomoth seems to be the more dangerous of the two, as it is described as scattering its toxins with every flap of its wings. Much like Venonat, Venomoth is nocturnal and feeds upon small insects.

Diglett

Number: 050[1] Type: Ground[1] Evolves from: None[1] Evolves into: Dugtrio[1]

Diglett (ディグダ Diguda?, Digda), known as the Mole Pokémon, is a small, brown mole, with what a large pink nose, with its body always halfway in the ground. Diglet live only a few feet underground, and feed on plant roots.[87] It burrows through the ground at a shallow depth, leaving raised earth in its wake,[88] perfect for planting crops.[89] Diglett are frequently kept on farms for this reason.[90] Diglett has very thin skin, and thus if Diglett is exposed to light its blood will heat up, causing it to grow weak.[91] Because of this, Diglett prefer dark places, sticking its head up only when the sun is not bright.[92][93] Otherwise, it pops up in caves.[93] Diglett make their homes in tunnels and caves under the earth, most of which are made by burrowing Onix.[94]

In Pokémon Stadium, Diglett featured in its own mini game called "Ekans Hoop Hurl", in which players must toss as many Ekans around as many Diglett as they can. In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Blue Rescue Team and Red Rescue Team, the third story mission of the game is to rescue a Diglett from Mt. Steel. Afterwards, Diglett can be found near Pelipper Post Office. In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness, Diglett is one of the members of Wigglytuff Guild. His primary role is sentry duty, to examine visitors' footprints and say what Pokémon they are.

In the anime, Diglett first appeared in Dig Those Diglett. They were causing trouble for a construction crew that planning on building a dam. The foreman insisted that the Diglett were to be exterminated, but the Pokémon of the trainers that happened to be in the area refused to fight them. The reason was that the Diglett and Dugtrio were helping to plant trees in the forest. Diglett were also used by a man named Poncho in The Underground Round-Up. He used them to dig tunnels underground of a town that was infested with Electrode. The tunnels sent the Electrode to an open field where they'd live in peace. Diglett were also featured in Plant It Now...Diglett Later!, helping villagers with crops and being the apparent target of some thieves. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Diglett makes a cameo in Raging Rhydon as wild Pokémon of Mt. Moon. Red also owns a Diglett that he uses against Eevee.

Considered one of the best Ground-type Pokemon in Red and Blue,[95] Diglett and Dugtrio's appearance has received criticism. IGN's Pokémon Chick criticized Diglett's and Dugtrio's designs, questioning how cute something with a "humongous gauche clown nose" and a lack of a body could be.[96] Destructoid's Jim Sterling called Diglett the "pinnacle of lazy goddamn design", further questioning how much effort went into the character's design during development of the game.[97]

Dugtrio

Number: 051[1] Type: Ground[1] Evolves from: Diglett[1] Evolves into: None[1]

Dugtrio (ダグトリオ Dagutorio?), known as the Mole Pokémon, consists of three Diglett that merged together into one body. They think exactly like each other, and work cooperatively.[98] They trigger earthquakes when they travel underground.[99] They burrow by bobbing their heads up and down separately.[100] They can dig over 60 miles in the hardest ground.[101]

In Pokémon Pinball, Dugtrio appears in a bonus stage that can be accessed by the Red Table. After the player has knocked out a number of Diglett, they must knock out the Dugtrio that appears to win. In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Red Rescue Team and Blue Rescue Team, Dugtrio sends the player to Mt. Steel to rescue his son. Dugtrio loves to show off to his son, but often forgets that people can't see him underground. In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness, Dugtrio is one of the members of the Wigglytuff Guild. He updates the Outlaw Notice Board and Job Bulletin Board with rotating boards. In Super Smash Bros. Brawl a Dugtrio can be seen on the Ground Terrain of the Pokémon Stadium 2 stage, situated next to a large rock.

Dugtrio first appeared in Dig Those Diglett. They worked with Diglett to plant trees in a forest. In The Underground Round Up, Poncho used Diglett and Dugtrio to rid a town of Electrode. Poncho used his Dugtrio to get rid of Team Rocket's Electrode Eliminator. Katie used a Dugtrio against Ash during the Hoenn League in Shocks and Bonds. Katie's Dugtrio defeated Ash's Pikachu and was defeated by Ash's Glalie. In the Pokémon Adventures manga, Giovanni owns a Dugtrio which was used to shatter the opening mechanisms on Red's Poké Balls, preventing him from releasing his Pokémon.

Considered one of the best Ground-type Pokemon in Red and Blue,[95] Diglett and Dugtrio's appearance has received criticism. IGN's Pokémon Chick criticized Diglett's and Dugtrio's designs, questioning how cute something with a "humongous gauche clown nose" and a lack of a body could be.[96] Destructoid's Jim Sterling called Diglett the "pinnacle of lazy goddamn design", further questioning how much effort went into the character's design during development of the game.[97]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp dq dr ds dt du dv dw dx dy dz ea eb ec ed ee ef eg eh ei ej ek el em en eo ep eq er es et eu ev ew ex ey ez fa fb fc fd fe ff fg fh fi fj fk fl fm fn fo fp fq fr fs ft fu fv fw fx fy fz ga gb gc gd ge gf gg gh gi gj gk gl gm gn go gp gq gr gs gt gu gv gw gx gy gz ha hb hc hd he hf hg hh hi hj hk hl hm hn ho hp hq hr hs ht hu hv hw hx hy hz Devin Morgan (27 April 2011). "Pokémon Black/White Pokédex". IGN Walkthroughs. IGN. http://au.faqs.ign.com/articles/116/1165064p1.html. Retrieved 11 June 2011. 
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  12. ^ Pokédex: As the bulb on its back grows larger, it appears to lose the ability to stand on its hind legs Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1998-09-30)
  13. ^ Pokédex: If the bud on its back starts to smell sweet, it is evidence that the large flower will soon bloom. Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2000-10-15)
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  16. ^ Pokédex: A common sight in forests and woods. It flaps its wings and ground level to kick up blinding sand. Game Freak. Pokémon Leaf Green. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2004-09-09)
  17. ^ Pokédex: The plant blooms when it is absorbing solar energy. It stays on the move to seek sunlight. Game Freak. Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. (Nintendo). Nintendo DS. (2007-04-22)
  18. ^ Pokédex: Charmander are obedient Pokémon. The flame on its tail indicates Chamander's life force. If it is healthy, the flame burns brightly. Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2000-10-15)
  19. ^ Pokédex: The flame that burns at the tip of its tail is an indication of its emotions. The flame wavers when CHARMANDER is enjoying itself. If the POKéMON becomes enraged, the flame burns fiercely. Game Freak. Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2003-03-17)
  20. ^ Pokédex: Obviously prefers hot places. When it rains, steam is said to spout from the tip of its tail. Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1998-09-30)
  21. ^ Pokédex: From the time it is born, a flame burns at the tip of its tail. Its life would end if the flame were to go out. Game Freak. Pokémon Fire Red. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2004-09-09)
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  23. ^ Pokédex: Tough fights could excite this Pokémon. When excited, it may blow out bluish-white flames. Game Freak. Pokémon Yellow. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1999-10-19)
  24. ^ Pokédex: When it swings its burning tail, it elevates the temperature to unbearably high levels. Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1998-09-30)
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  28. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Ruby. (Nintendo). Game Boy Advance. (2003-03-17) "Charizard flies around the sky in search of powerful opponents. It breathes fire of such great heat that it melts anything. However, it never turns its fiery breath on any opponent weaker than itself."
  29. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Emerald. (Nintendo). Game Boy Advance. (2005-05-01) "A Charizard flies about in search of strong opponents. It breathes intense flames that can melt any material. However, it will never torch a weaker foe."
  30. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. (Nintendo). Game Boy Color. (2000-10-15) "If Charizard becomes furious, the flame at the tip of its tail flare up in a whitish-blue color."
  31. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1998-09-30) "It spits fire that is hot enough to melt boulders. Known to cause forest fires unintentionally."
  32. ^ Pokédex: Shoots water at prey while in the water. Withdraws into its shell when in danger. Game Freak. Pokémon Yellow. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1999-10-19)
  33. ^ Pokédex: It shelters itself in its shell, then strikes back with spouts of water at every opportunity. Game Freak. Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. (Nintendo). Nintendo DS. (2007-04-22)
  34. ^ Pokédex: Squirtle's shell is not merely used for protection. The shell's rounded shape and the grooves on its surface help minimize resistance in water, enabling this Pokémon to swim at high speeds. Game Freak. Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire. (Nintendo). Game Boy Advance. (2003-03-17)
  35. ^ Pokédex: The tail becomes increasingly deeper in color as Wartortle ages. The scratches on its shell are evidence of this Pokémon's toughness as a fighter. Game Freak. Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire. (Nintendo). Game Boy Advance. (2003-03-17)
  36. ^ Pokédex: When trapped, this Pokémon will pull in its head, but its tail will still stick out a little bit. Game Freak. Pokémon Yellow. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1999-10-19)
  37. ^ Pokédex: It cleverly controls its furry ears and tail to maintain its balance while swimming. Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2000-10-15)
  38. ^ Pokédex: It is said to live 10,000 years. Game Freak. Pokémon Diamond. (Nintendo). Nintendo DS. (2007-04-22)
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  42. ^ Pokédex: The waterspouts that protrude from its shell are highly accurate. Their bullets of water can precisely nail tin cans from a distance of over 165 feet. Game Freak. 'Pokémon Emerald'. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2005-05-01)
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  44. ^ Pokédex: It crawls into foliage where it camouflages itself among leaves that are the same color as its body. Game Freak. Pokémon Crystal. (Nintendo). Game Boy Color. (2001-07-29)
  45. ^ Pokédex: It has large, eye-like patterns on its head as protection. They are used to frighten off enemies. Game Freak. Pokémon Stadium. (Nintendo). Nintendo 64. (2000-03-06)
  46. ^ Pokédex: Its short feet are tipped with suction pads that enable it to tirelessly climb slopes and walls. Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1998-09-30)
  47. ^ Pokédex: For protection, it releases a horrible stench from the antenna on its head to drive away enemies. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2000-10-15)
  48. ^ Pokédex: It prepares for evolution by hardening its shell as much as possible to protect its soft body. Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2000-10-15)
  49. ^ Pokédex: Inside the shell, it is soft and weak as it prepares to evolve. It stays motionless in the shell. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2000-10-15)
  50. ^ Pokédex: Hardens its shell to protect itself. However, a large impact may cause it to pop out of its shell. Game Freak. Yellow. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1999-10-19)
  51. ^ Pokédex: It collects honey every day. It rubs honey onto the hairs on its legs to carry it back to its nest. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2000-10-15)
  52. ^ Pokédex: Water-repellent powder on its wings enables it to collect honey, even in the heaviest of rains. Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2000-10-15)
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  54. ^ Pokédex: It uses its whiskers to maintain its balance. It apparently slows down if they are cut off. Game Freak. Pokémon LeafGreen. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2004-09-09)
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  56. ^ Pokédex: Gnaws on anything with its tough fangs. It can even topple concrete buildings by gnawing on them. Game Freak. Gold. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2000-10-15)
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  62. ^ Pokédex: It flaps its short wings to flush out insects from tall grass. It then plucks them with its stubby beak. Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (2000-10-15)
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  69. ^ Pokédex: With its huge and magnificent wings, it can keep aloft without ever having to land for rest. Game Freak. Pokémon LeafGreen. (Nintendo). Game Boy Advance. (2004-09-09)
  70. ^ Pokédex: It shoots itself suddenly high into the sky, then plummets down in one fell swoop to strike its prey. Game Freak. Pokémon Stadium. (Nintendo). Nintendo 64. (2001-03-26)
  71. ^ Pokédex: Its long neck and elongated beak are ideal for catching prey in soil or water. It deftly moves this extended and skinny beak to pluck prey. Game Freak. Pokémon Emerald. (Nintendo). Game Boy Advance. (2005-05-01)
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  73. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Yellow. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1999-10-19) "When resting deep in its burrow, its thorns always retract. This is proof that it is relaxed."
  74. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. (Nintendo). Game Boy Color. (2000-10-15) "It has a calm and caring nature. Because its horn grows slowly it prefers not to fight."
  75. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. (Nintendo). Game Boy Color. (2000-10-15) "When feeding its young, it first chews and tenderizes the food, then spits it out for the offspring."
  76. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1998-09-30) "The female's horn develops slowly. Prefers physical attacks such as clawing and biting."
  77. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Ruby. (Nintendo). Game Boy Advance. (2003-03-17) "When Nidorina are with their friends or family, they keep their barbs tucked away to prevent hurting each other. This Pokémon appears to become nervous if separated from the others."
  78. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon FireRed. (Nintendo). Game Boy Advance. (2004-09-07) "The female has a gentle temperament. It emits ultrasonic cries that have the power to befuddle foes."
  79. ^ Audrey. "Nidoking - #42 Top Pokémon - IGN". IGN. http://www.ign.com/top/pokemon/42. Retrieved 2011-05-05. 
  80. ^ http://guides.ign.com/guides/15787/basics.html
  81. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. (Nintendo). Game Boy Color. (2000-10-15) "Poison oozes from all over its body. It catches and eats small bugs at night that are attracted by light."
  82. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Yellow. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1999-10-19) "Its large eyes act as radars. In a bright place, you can see that they are clusters of many tiny eyes."
  83. ^ a b Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1998-09-30) "Lives in the shadows of tall trees where it eats bugs. It is attracted by light at night."
  84. ^ Buffa, Chris. "Top 10 Weirdest Looking Pokémon". GameDaily. AOL. Archived from the original on 2011-05-09. http://replay.web.archive.org/20090415052842/http://www.gamedaily.com/articles/galleries/top-10-weirdest-looking-pokemon/?page=8. Retrieved 2009-06-09. 
  85. ^ Elston, Brett. "The complete Pokémon RBY pokédex, part 5". GamesRadar. Future Publishing. p. 4. http://www.gamesradar.com/ds/f/the-complete-pokemon-rby-pokedex-part-5/a-20070820141819445080/g-2006100415372930075/p-4. Retrieved 2009-10-01. 
  86. ^ http://www.gamesradar.com/f/pokemon-monday-29-ditto-is-a-failed-mew-clone/a-20101213134335402003
  87. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1998-09-30) "Lives about one yard underground where it feeds on plant roots. It sometimes appears aboveground."
  88. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon FireRed. (Nintendo). Game Boy Advance. (2004-09-07) "It burrows through the ground at a shallow depth. It leaves raised earth in its wake, making it easy to spot."
  89. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. (Nintendo). Game Boy Color. (2000-10-15) "If a Diglett digs through a field, it leaves the soil perfectly tilled and ideal for planting crops."
  90. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Ruby. (Nintendo). Game Boy Advance. (2003-03-17) "Diglett are raised in most farms. The reason is simple - wherever this Pokémon burrows, the soil is left perfectly tilled for planting crops. This soil is made ideal for growing delicious vegetables."
  91. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. (Nintendo). Game Boy Color. (2000-10-15) "Its skin is very thin. If it is exposed to light, its blood heats up, causing it to grow weak."
  92. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Crystal. (Nintendo). Game Boy Color. (2001-07-29) "It digs underground and chews on tree roots, sticking its head out only when the sun isn't bright."
  93. ^ a b Game Freak. Pokémon Yellow. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1999-10-19) "It prefers dark places. It spends most of its time underground, though it may pop up in caves."
  94. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Yellow. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1999-10-19) "Burrows at high speed in search of food. The tunnels it leaves are used as homes by Diglett."
  95. ^ a b http://guides.ign.com/guides/16708/page_214.html
  96. ^ a b http://faqs.ign.com/articles/381/381486p1.html
  97. ^ a b http://www.destructoid.com/thirty-rubbish-pokemon-red-blue-edition-92171.phtml?s=100
  98. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Ruby. (Nintendo). Game Boy Advance. (2003-03-17) "Dugtrio are actually triplets that emerged from one body. As a result, each triplet thinks exactly like the other two triplets. They work cooperatively to burrow endlessly."
  99. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Red and Blue. (Nintendo). Game Boy. (1998-09-30) "A team of Diglett triplets. It triggers huge earthquakes by burrowing 60 miles underground."
  100. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Gold. (Nintendo). Game Boy Color. (2000-10-15) "Its three heads bob separately up and down to loosen the soil nearby, making it easier for it to burrow."
  101. ^ Game Freak. Pokémon Silver. (Nintendo). Game Boy Color. (2000-10-15) "Extremely powerful, they can dig through even the hardest ground to a depth of over 60 miles."

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