Magic: The Gathering World Championship


Magic: The Gathering World Championship
Magic: The Gathering World Championships
Year Winner Held in
1994 United States Zak Dolan Milwaukee, WI, USA
1995 Switzerland Alexander Blumke Seattle, WA, USA
1996 Australia Tom Chanpheng Seattle, WA, USA
1997 Czech Republic Jakub Slemr Seattle, WA, USA
1998 United States Brian Selden Seattle, WA, USA
1999 Germany Kai Budde Yokohama, Japan
2000 United States Jon Finkel Brussels, Belgium
2001 Netherlands Tom van de Logt Toronto, Canada
2002 Brazil Carlos Romão Sydney, Australia
2003 Germany Daniel Zink Berlin, Germany
2004 Netherlands Julien Nuijten San Francisco, CA, USA
2005 Japan Katsuhiro Mori Yokohama, Japan
2006 Japan Makihito Mihara Paris, France
2007 Israel Uri Peleg New York City, NY, USA
2008 Finland Antti Malin Memphis, TN, USA
2009 Portugal André Coimbra Rome, Italy
2010 France Guillaume Matignon Chiba, Japan
2011 Japan Jun'ya Iyanaga San Francisco, CA, USA

The Magic: The Gathering World Championships (Worlds) have been held annually since 1994. It is the most important tournament in the game of Magic: The Gathering, offering to the winner a cash prize of $45,000. Originally open to all competitors, Worlds is now an invitation-only event and the last Pro Tour of each season. The invitees are mostly top finishers from the National championships, the top-ranked players of the DCI and high-level pro players.

After the first five World Championships were all held in the United States, Worlds were held in various places outside the US, most of which were either in Europe or Japan. Besides the main event Worlds is always a huge gathering of Magic players, who come to watch the pros and compete in side events.

Contents

History

A view over the hall at the 2009 Magic Worlds in Rome.

The first World Championship was held in 1994 at the Gen Con fair in Milwaukee. Despite the name the tournament varied considerably from later Worlds. The tournament was open to all competitors, its mode was single-elimination, and it featured just one format, Type I (now Vintage).[1] Starting with the 1995 Worlds all subsequent Worlds were open to invited players only.

With the introduction of the Pro Tour in 1996 the World Championship became the final stop of each Pro Tour season. As the final event to award Pro points every season, Worlds also since hosts the Pro Player of the Year award ceremony. Traditionally held in August, Worlds was moved to the end of the year between 2004 and 2006, when the Pro Tour season was adjusted to the calendar year. Since the inception of the Hall of Fame in 2005 Worlds also hosts the induction ceremony of each year's class.

Mode

Most Worlds have been held over five days, hosting an individual and a team competition. The individual competition consists of three disciplines in which every participant has to compete. Traditionally that has been six rounds of Standard played on the first day, two Drafts of three rounds each on the second, and six rounds of some previously determined constructed format on the third day. The fourth day hosted the national team competition. On the final day the best eight players from the individual competition returned to determine the World Champion in three rounds of single elimination.

Beginning with the 2007 Worlds the tournament has been shortened to four days. The schedule has been altered to further accommodate all parts of the competition.

Participants

The following players are eligible to play in the World Championship:[2]

  • Current World Champion
  • 2nd to 8th place finishers from the previous World Championship.
  • Current Pro Player of the Year.
  • For countries that hold an invitation-only National Championship, the three members of each national team and that team’s designated alternate.
  • For countries that hold an open National Championship, the winner of that National Championship.
  • Players with Pro Tour Players Club level 4 or higher. (This includes all members of the Hall of Fame.)
  • Players with Pro Tour Players Club level 3 that have not yet used their Players Club invitation
  • Top 25 DCI Total-ranked players from the APAC region.
  • Top 25 DCI Total-ranked players from Japan.
  • Top 50 DCI Total-ranked players from the Europe region.
  • Top 50 DCI Total-ranked players from the Latin America region.
  • Top 50 DCI Total-ranked players from the North America region.
  • Players invited to the Magic Online Championship held the same week (New in 2009).[3]

(Compare Magic Premier Event Invitation Policy). In recent years, the tournament location has alternated between North America, Asia-Pacific, and Europe.

On 2nd November 2011, Wizards of the Coast announced a major change to the structure of the World Championship.[4] It was announced that as of 2012, the World Championship will move from being a Pro Tour-sized event to an exclusive sixteen-person tournament. These sixteen players will be:

  • Current World Champion
  • Current Magic Online Champion
  • Winners of the previous three Pro Tours
  • The top-ranked player from each geo-region (Asia Pacific, Europe, Japan, Latin America, and North America) in the Planeswalker Points Yearly Professional Total who are not yet invited based on the above criteria
  • The top-ranked players in the worldwide Planeswalker Points Yearly Professional Total who are not yet invited based on the above criteria sufficient to bring the total number of invited players to the World Championship to sixteen

1994 World championship

Zak Dolan – 1994 World Championship
Angel Stasis
Main Deck: Sideboard:

1 Black Vise
1 Howling Mine
1 Icy Manipulator
1 Ivory Tower
2 Meekstone
1 Winter Orb
1 Ancestral Recall
1 Clone
1 Control Magic
1 Mana Drain
2 Old Man of the Sea
1 Recall
1 Siren's Call
2 Stasis
1 Time Elemental
1 Timetwister
1 Time Walk
1 Vesuvan Doppelganger
1 Birds of Paradise
1 Ley Druid
1 Regrowth
1 Armageddon
2 Disenchant
1 Kismet
4 Serra Angel
4 Swords to Plowshares
1 Wrath of God

1 Library of Alexandria
4 Savannah
2 Strip Mine
4 Tropical Island
4 Tundra

1 Black Lotus
1 Mox Emerald
1 Mox Ruby
1 Mox Pearl
1 Mox Sapphire
1 Mox Jet
1 Sol Ring
1 Mana Vault

1 Chaos Orb
1 CoP Red
1 Copy Artifact
1 Diamond Valley
1 In the Eye of Chaos
1 Floral Spuzzem
2 Karma
1 Magical Hack
1 Powersink
1 Presence of the Master
1 Reverse Damage
1 Sleight of Mind
1 Kismet
1 Winter Blast

The first Magic World Championship was held at the Gen Con in Milwaukee, USA on 19–21 August 1994. It is the only Worlds tournament which was held in the Vintage format, then known as Type I. The 1994 Worlds is also the only Worlds which was not an invite-only tournament, instead everybody could register, but the tournament was capped at 512 participants. After two days of single elimination play the final four players featured Bertrand Lestrée, who defeated Cyrille DeFoucaud 2–0 in his semi-final, and Zak Dolan, who defeated Dominic Symens 2–0 in the other semi-final. In the final Dolan defeated Lestrée 2–1.[1]

Final standings
  1. United States Zak Dolan
  2. France Bertrand Lestrée
  3. Belgium Dominic Symens
  4. France Cyrille de Foucaud


1995 World championship

Alexander Blumke – 1995 World Championship[5]
Rack Control
Main Deck: Sideboard:

1 Disrupting Scepter
2 Icy Manipulator
3 The Rack
2 Zuran Orb
3 Dance of the Dead
1 Dark Banishing
4 Dark Ritual
4 Hymn to Tourach
3 Hypnotic Specter
1 Mind Twist
1 Pestilence
1 Royal Assassin
2 Sengir Vampire
2 Terror
1 Power Sink
1 Balance
3 Disenchant
1 Land Tax
1 Spirit Link
1 Swords to Plowshares

3 Adarkar Wastes
1 Bottomless Vault
4 Mishra's Factory
3 Plains
1 Strip Mine
12 Swamp
1 Underground River

1 CoP Artifact
1 CoP Black
2 CoP Red
1 Land Tax
1 Prismatic Ward
4 Gloom
2 Stromgald Cabal
1 Blue Elemental Blast
1 Magical Hack
1 Sleight of Mind

The second Magic Worlds Championship was held on 4–6 August at the Red Lion Inn in Seattle, USA.[6] 71 players from 19 countries participated. The tournament featured five rounds of Sealed Deck on the first day and five rounds of Standard, then known as Type II, on the second day. Points were awarded for each individual game instead of completed matches as today.[7] The top 8 on Sunday were played with the Standard decks from the day before. In the final Alexander Blumke defeated Mark Hernandez 3–2.[8]

Final standings

  1. Switzerland Alexander Blumke
  2. France Marc Hernandez
  3. United States Mark Justice
  4. United States Henry Stern
  5. Italy Ivan Curina
  6. Italy Andrea Redi
  7. Finland Henri Schildt
  8. Austria Mu Luen Wang
Team champion
  1. United States United States – Mark Justice, Henry Stern, Peter Leiher, Michael Long
  2. Finland Finland – Rosendahl, Henry Schildt, Kimmo Hovi, Punakallio
  3. Australia Australia – Shandley, Hubson, Russell, Liew
  4. France France – Marc Hernandez, Moulin, Woirgard, Liew


1996 World championship

Tom Chanpheng – 1996 World Championship
White Weenie
Main Deck: Sideboard:

1 Lodestone Bauble
2 Phyrexian War Beast
1 Zuran Orb
1 Sleight of Mind
1 Armageddon
1 Balance
4 Disenchant
1 Land Tax
4 Order of Leitbur
4 Order of the White Shield
1 Reinforcements
1 Reprisal
4 Savannah Lions
2 Serra Angel
4 Swords to Plowshares
4 White Knight

1 Kjeldoran Outpost
4 Mishra's Factory
15 Plains
4 Strip Mine

2 Arenson's Aura
1 Black Vise
4 Divine Offering
1 Energy Storm
1 Exile
1 Reprisal
1 Spirit Link
1 Sleight of Mind
2 Serrated Arrows
1 Kjeldoran Outpost

The third Magic World Championship was held at the Wizards headquarters in Seattle, USA. It was the first Worlds also to be a Pro Tour. 125 players competed in the event.[9] The tournament featured a Booster Draft, a Standard (Type II), and a Legacy (Type 1.5) portion.[10]

Final standings

  1. Australia Tom Chanpheng
  2. United States Mark Justice
  3. United States Henry Stern
  4. Sweden Olle Råde
  5. United States Matt Place
  6. United States Scott Johns
  7. Canada Eric Tam
  8. Finland Tommi Hovi

Note that Chanpeng's winning deck included a Sleight of Mind, but no sources of blue mana. This stems from an error in his submitted decklist. He was forced to use plains in lieu of the 4 Adarkar Wastes he had planned to include.

Tom's victory was commemorated with a unique card, named 1996 World Champion.

Team final
  1. United States United States – Dennis Bentley, George Baxter, Mike Long, Matt Place
  2. Czech Republic Czech Republic – David Korejtko, Jakub Slemr, Ondrej Baudys, Lucas Kocourek
Pro Tour Player of the Year
  1. Sweden Olle Råde
  2. United States Shawn "Hammer" Regnier
  3. United States Mark Justice


1997 World championship

Jakub Slemr – 1997 World Championship
Main Deck: Sideboard:

4 Black Knight
4 Choking Sands
4 Contagion
4 Fallen Askari
4 Knight of Stromgald
1 Necratog
4 Nekrataal
2 Shadow Guildmage
4 Man-o-War
2 Uktabi Orangutan
2 Earthquake
4 Incinerate

3 City of Brass
3 Gemstone Mine
2 Sulfurous Springs
10 Swamp
1 Underground River
3 Undiscovered Paradise

2 Disenchant
1 Exile
1 Honorable Passage
3 Pyroblast
2 Dystopia
2 Ebony Charm
2 Forsaken Wastes
2 Hydroblast

The fourth Magic World Championship was held on 13–17 August 1997 in Seattle, USA. 153 players competed in the event.[11] It was the first Magic tournament to be filmed by ESPN2. The competition featured Standard, Mirage-Visions-Weatherlight Rochester Draft, and Extended.[10]

Final standings

  1. Czech Republic Jakub Slemr
  2. Germany Janosch Kühn
  3. Canada Paul McCabe
  4. Denmark Svend Geertsen
  5. Canada Gabriel Tsang
  6. Sweden Nikolai Weibull
  7. United States Nate Clark
  8. United States John Chinnock
Team final
  1. Canada Canada – Gary Krakower, Michael Donais, Ed Ito, Gabriel Tsang
  2. Sweden Sweden – Nikolai Weibull, Matthias Jorstedt, Marcus Angelin, Johan Cedercrantz
Pro Tour Player of the Year
  1. Canada Paul McCabe
  2. Canada Terry Borer


1998 World championship

Brian Selden – 1998 World Championship
RecSur
Main Deck: Sideboard:

2 Scroll Rack
2 Lobotomy
2 Nekrataal
4 Recurring Nightmare
1 Spirit of the Night
1 Thrull Surgeon
1 Man-o-War
1 Tradewind Rider
4 Birds of Paradise
2 Spike Feeder
1 Spike Weaver
4 Survival of the Fittest
2 Uktabi Orangutan
1 Verdant Force
4 Wall of Blossoms
2 Wall of Roots
2 Firestorm
1 Orcish Settlers
1 Cloudchaser Eagle

3 City of Brass
8 Forest
1 Gemstone Mine
2 Karplusan Forest
2 Reflecting Pool
1 Swamp
2 Underground River
2 Undiscovered Paradise
1 Volrath's Stronghold

1 Staunch Defenders
3 Emerald Charm
1 Hall of Gemstone
2 Pyroblast
4 Boil
2 Dread of Night
2 Phyrexian Furnace

The fifth Magic World Championship was held on 12–16 August 1998 in Seattle, USA. This tournament featured a Tempest-Stronghold-Exodus Booster Draft, Standard, and Tempest Block Constructed.[10]

203 players competed in the event.[12] The USA dominated the top 8, taking seven of the eight slots. The USA also won the team competition.[10]

Finishing order
  1. United States Brian Selden
  2. United States Ben Rubin
  3. United States Jon Finkel
  4. France Raphaël Lévy
  5. United States Scott Johns
  6. United States Chris Pikula
  7. United States Brian Hacker
  8. United States Alan Comer
Team final
  1. United States United States – Matt Linde, Mike Long, Bryce Currence, Jon Finkel
  2. France France – Pierre Malherbaud, Manuel Bevand, Marc Hernandez, Fabien Demazeau
Pro Tour Player of the Year
  1. United States Jon Finkel
  2. United States Randy Buehler
  3. United States Steven O'Mahoney-Schwartz
Rookie of the Year
  1. United States Randy Buehler


1999 World championship

Kai Budde – 1999 World Championship
Wildfire
Main Deck: Sideboard:

4 Cursed Scroll
4 Fire Diamond
4 Grim Monolith
3 Masticore
1 Karn, Silver Golem
2 Mishra's Helix
4 Temporal Aperture
4 Thran Dynamo
4 Voltaic Key
2 Worn Powerstone
4 Covetous Dragon
4 Wildfire

3 Ancient Tomb
4 City of Traitors
13 Mountain

2 Boil
3 Earthquake
2 Rack and Ruin
2 Shattering Pulse
4 Spellshock
1 Mishra's Helix
1 Phyrexian Processor

The sixth Magic World Championship was held on 4–8 August 1999 in Yokohama, Japan. This tournament featured an Urza's Saga-Urza's Legacy-Urza's Destiny Rochester Draft, Standard, and Extended.[10]

208 players from 32 countries competed in the event.[13] In the final Kai Budde defeated Mark Le Pine 3–0 in about 20 minutes, the quickest Pro Tour final ever. Budde's win was the first of his seven Pro Tour victories. By winning this title he also claimed the first of his four Pro Player of the Year titles.[10]

Finishing order
  1. Germany Kai Budde
  2. United States Mark Le Pine
  3. Italy Raffaele Lo Moro
  4. United States Matt Linde
  5. Czech Republic Jakub Slemr
  6. United States Jamie Parke
  7. Canada Gary Wise
  8. Norway Nicolai Herzog
Team final
  1. United States United States – Kyle Rose, John Hunka, Zvi Mowshowitz, Charles Kornblith
  2. Germany Germany – Marco Blume, Patrick Mello, David Brucker, Rosario Maij
Pro Tour Player of the Year
  1. Germany Kai Budde
  2. United States Jon Finkel
  3. United States Casey McCarrel
Rookie of the Year
  1. Germany Dirk Baberowski


2000 World championship

Jon Finkel – 2000 World Championship
Tinker
Main Deck: Sideboard:

1 Crumbling Sanctuary
4 Grim Monolith
4 Masticore
4 Metalworker
1 Mishra's Helix
1 Phyrexian Colossus
4 Phyrexian Processor
4 Tangle Wire
4 Thran Dynamo
4 Voltaic Key
4 Brainstorm
4 Tinker

4 Crystal Vein
9 Island
4 Rishadan Port
4 Saprazzan Skerry

4 Annul
4 Chill
4 Miscalculation
2 Rising Waters
1 Mishra's Helix

The seventh Magic World Championship was held in Brussels, Belgium on 2–6 August 2000. It was the first time the Worlds were held in Europe. The tournament featured a Mercadian Masques-Nemesis-Prophecy Booster Draft, Mercadian Masques Block Constructed, and Standard.[10]

273 players from 46 countries competed in the event.[14] In the final Jon Finkel defeated his friend, Bob Maher. Both played nearly identical decks with a difference of just one card.[10]

Finishing order
  1. United States Jon Finkel
  2. United States Bob Maher, Jr.
  3. Germany Dominik Hothow
  4. Austria Benedikt Klauser
  5. Netherlands Tom van de Logt
  6. Austria Helmut Summersberger
  7. Germany Janosch Kühn
  8. France Nicolas Labarre
Team final
  1. United States United States – Jon Finkel, Chris Benafel, Frank Hernandez, Aaron Forsythe
  2. Canada Canada – Ryan Fuller, Murray Evans, Gabriel Tsang, Sam Lau
Pro Tour Player of the Year
  1. United States Bob Maher, Jr.
  2. United States Darwin Kastle
  3. United States Jon Finkel
Rookie of the Year
  1. United States Brian Davis


2001 World championship

Tom van de Logt – 2001 World Championship
Machine Head
Main Deck: Sideboard:

4 Plague Spitter
3 Phyrexian Scuta
3 Skizzik
2 Flametongue Kavu
2 Crypt Angel
4 Blazing Specter
4 Duress
4 Dark Ritual
4 Terminate
3 Vendetta
3 Urza's Rage

6 Swamp
6 Mountain
4 Rishadan Port
4 Urborg Volcano
4 Sulfurous Springs

4 Scoria Cat
3 Addle
2 Persecute
1 Pyroclasm
3 Phyrexian Arena
1 Flametongue Kavu
1 Crypt Angel

(Complete coverage)

The eighth World Championship was held from 8 to 12 August 2001 at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre in Toronto, Canada. The tournament featured Invasion-Planeshift-Apocalypse Rochester Draft, Standard, and Extended as individual formats and Invasion block team rochester as the team format.[15]

296 players from 51 countries competed in the tournament.[16] Tom van de Logt from the Netherlands came out as the new world champion, garnering a prize of $35,000 for his victory (as well as another $1,000 for the success of the Dutch team he was part of). Other finalists included future World Series of Poker bracelet winner Alex Borteh (2nd place), Antoine Ruel (3rd place), Andrea Santin (4th place), Mike Turian (5th place), Jan Tomcani (6th place), Tommi Hovi (7th place), and David Williams (disqualified).[15] John Ormerod did not make the top 8 finishers, but was awarded 8th place after David Williams was disqualified for a marked deck.[17] The team competition was won by the US team, which defeated Norway in the team final.[15]

Finishing Order
  1. Netherlands Tom van de Logt
  2. United States Alex Borteh
  3. France Antoine Ruel
  4. Italy Andrea Santin
  5. United States Mike Turian
  6. Slovakia Jan Tomcani
  7. Finland Tommi Hovi
  8. England John Ormerod
Team final
  1. United States United States – Trevor Blackwell, Brian Hegstad, Eugene Harvey
  2. Norway NorwayNicolai Herzog, Oyvind Odegaard, Jan Pieter Groenhof
Pro Tour Player of the Year
  1. Germany Kai Budde
  2. Netherlands Kamiel Cornelissen
  3. United States Michael Pustilnik
Rookie of the Year
  1. Japan Katsuhiro Mori


2002 World championship

Carlos Romão – 2002 World Championship
Psychatog
Main Deck: Sideboard:

4 Nightscape Familiar
4 Psychatog
3 Chainers Edict
3 Circular Logic
4 Counterspell
3 Cunning Wish
3 Deep Analysis
3 Fact or Fiction
3 Memory Lapse
4 Repulse
2 Upheaval

10 Island
2 Cephalid Coliseum
1 Darkwater Catacombs
4 Salt Marsh
3 Swamp
4 Underground River

1 Coffin Purge
4 Duress
1 Fact or Fiction
1 Gainsay
3 Ghastly Demise
1 Hibernation
1 Mana Short
1 Recoil
1 Slay
1 Teferis Response

(Complete coverage)

The ninth World Championship was held from 14 to 18 August 2002 at Fox Studios in Sydney, Australia. The tournament featured Odyssey-Torment-Judgment Booster Draft, Odyssey Block Constructed, and Standard as individual formats and Odyssey Team Rochester Draft as the team format.[15]

245 players from 46 countries competed in the tournament.[18] 24-year old Carlos "Jaba" Romão from São Paulo, Brazil came out as world champion, defeating Mark Ziegner 3–2 in the final, thereby garnering a prize of $35,000 with the help of his blue/black "Psychatog" deck. Germany won the team competition, defeating the United States in the final 2–1.

Finishing order
  1. Brazil Carlos Romão
  2. Germany Mark Ziegner
  3. Argentina Diego Ostrovich
  4. United States Dave Humpherys
  5. Malaysia Sim Han How
  6. Republic of Ireland John Larkin
  7. Finland Tuomas Kotiranta
  8. United States Ken Krouner
Team final
  1. Germany Germany – Kai Budde, Mark Ziegner, Felix Schneiders
  2. United States United States – Eugene Harvey, Andrew Ranks, Eric Franz
Pro Tour Player of the Year
  1. Germany Kai Budde
  2. Sweden Jens Thorén
  3. United States Alex Shvartsman
Rookie of the Year
  1. France Farid Meraghni


2003 World championship

Daniel Zink – 2003 World Championship
Wake
Main Deck: Sideboard:

4 Mana Leak
1 Circular Logic
4 Wrath of God
2 Vengeful Dreams
3 Moment's Peace
3 Renewed Faith
3 Mirari's Wake
1 Mirari
4 Deep Analysis
3 Compulsion
3 Cunning Wish
2 Decree of Justice

4 Krosan Verge
4 Skycloud Expanse
4 Forest
4 Plains
7 Island
2 Flooded Strand
2 Elfhame Palace

1 Vengeful Dreams
1 Hunting Pack
1 Wing Shards
1 Circular Logic
1 Ray of Distortion
1 Renewed Faith
1 Krosan Reclamation
2 Exalted Angel
3 Ray of Revelation
3 Anurid Brushhopper

(Complete coverage)

The tenth World Championship was held from 6 to 10 August at the Estrel Hotel in Berlin, Germany.[15] The tournament featured Onslaught-Legions-Scourge Rochester Draft, Extended, and Standard as individual formats and Onslaught Team Rochester Draft as the team format.[19]

312 players from 54 countries participated in the tournament. German Daniel Zink managed to emerge as the new world champion, beating Japan's Jin Okamoto 3–0 in the finals and taking home $35,000 in the process. The total prize money awarded to the top 64 finishers was $208,130.[19] In the team final the United States defeated Finland 2–1.[19]

Finishing order
  1. Germany Daniel Zink
  2. Japan Jin Okamoto
  3. Finland Tuomo Nieminen
  4. United States Dave Humpherys
  5. Netherlands Jeroen Remie
  6. Germany Peer Kröger
  7. Germany Wolfgang Eder
  8. United States Gabe Walls
Team Finals
  1. United States United States – Justin Gary, Gabe Walls, Joshua Wagner
  2. Finland Finland – Tomi Walamies, Tuomo Nieminen, Arho Toikka

Player of the Year Race

  1. Germany Kai Budde
  2. United States Justin Gary
  3. Sweden Mattias Jorstedt
Rookie of the Year
Japan Masashi Oiso


2004 World championship

Julien Nuijten – 2004 World Championship
W/G Astral Slide
Main Deck: Sideboard:

4 Viridian Shaman
4 Eternal Witness
4 Eternal Dragon

4 Wrath of God
4 Renewed Faith
4 Astral Slide
2 Akroma's Vengeance
2 Decree of Justice
1 Plow Under
2 Wing Shards
4 Rampant Growth

4 Secluded Steppe
4 Tranquil Thicket
4 Windswept Heath
6 Plains
7 Forest

4 Oxidize
2 Rude Awakening
3 Scrabbling Claws
3 Circle of Protection: Red
3 Plow Under

(Complete coverage)

The eleventh World Championship was held from 1 to 5 September at the Fort Mason Center in San Francisco, California, USA.[20] The tournament featured Standard on Wednesday, Mirrodin-Darksteel-Fifth Dawn Booster Draft on Thursday, and Mirrodin Block Constructed on Friday. The team format was Mirrodin Block Team Rochester Draft.[21]

304 players from 51 countries competed in the event. This was the first ever World Championships without a player from the United States in the Top 8. Julien Nuijten won the final 3–1 against Aeo Paquette. At 15 years old, he became the youngest ever Pro Tour winner and took home a total of $52,366 – a new record for winnings in a single collectible card game tournament. The total prize money awarded to the top 64 finishers was $208,130. Team Germany won the team final 2–1 against Belgium.[20]

Finishing order
  1. Netherlands Julien Nuijten
  2. Canada Aeo Paquette
  3. Japan Ryou Ogura
  4. France Manuel Bevand
  5. Netherlands Kamiel Cornelissen
  6. Malaysia Terry Soh
  7. France Gabriel Nassif
  8. Canada Murray Evans
Team final
  1. Germany Germany – Torben Twiefel, Roland Bode, Sebastian Zink
  2. Belgium Belgium – Vincent Lemoine, Dilson Ramos Da Fonseca, Geoffery Siron
Player of the Year Race
  1. France Gabriel Nassif
  2. Norway Nicolai Herzog
  3. Norway Rickard Österberg
Rookie of the Year
Netherlands Julien Nuijten


2005 World championship

(Complete coverage)

Katsuhiro Mori – 2005 World Championship
Ghazi Glare
Main Deck: Sideboard:

2 Yosei, The Morning Star
3 Arashi the Sky Asunder
1 Birds of Paradise
4 Selesnya Guildmage
4 Wood Elves
4 Loxodon Hierarch
3 Kodama of the North Tree
3 Llanowar Elves

3 Pithing Needle
3 Umezawa's Jitte
2 Congregation at Dawn
3 Glare of Subdual
2 Seed Spark

4 Vitu-Ghazi, The City Tree
4 Selesnya Sanctuary
1 Okina, Temple to the Grandfathers
4 Brushland
5 Forest
4 Temple Garden
1 Plains

2 Greater Good
1 Kodama of the North Tree
2 Naturalize
2 Carven Caryatid
1 Seedborn Muse
1 Wrath of God
1 Kodama's Reach
2 Yosei, the Morning Star
3 Hokori, Dust Drinker

The twelfth World Championship was held from 30 November to 4 December at the Pacifico Yokohama in Yokohama, Japan. The tournament featured Standard on Wednesday, Ravnica Booster Draft on Thursday, and Extended on Friday. The team format was Ravnica Team Rochester Draft.[22] The event began with the induction of the first class of the newly incepted Hall of Fame – Alan Comer, Jon Finkel, Tommi Hovi, Darwin Kastle, and Olle Råde.[23]

287 players from 56 countries competed in the event. Katsuhiro Mori won the tournament, defeating Frank Karsten 3–1 in the final, taking home $35,000. The total prize money awarded to the top 64 finishers was $208,130. In the team final Japan defeated the United States 3–0.[22]

Finishing Order
  1. Japan Katsuhiro Mori
  2. Netherlands Frank Karsten
  3. Japan Tomohiro Kaji
  4. Japan Akira Asahara
  5. Portugal Marcio Carvalho
  6. Singapore Ding Leong
  7. Japan Shuhei Nakamura
  8. Portugal André Coimbra
Team final
  1. Japan Japan – Takuma Morofuji, Ichirou Shimura, Masashi Oiso
  2. United States United States – Antonino De Rosa, Neil Reeves, Jonathan Sonne
Player of the Year Race
  1. Japan Kenji Tsumura
  2. France Olivier Ruel
  3. Japan Masashi Oiso
Rookie of the Year
  1. France Pierre Canali
Hall of Fame inductees

2006 World championship

(Complete Coverage)

Makihito Mihara – 2006 World Championship
Dragonstorm
Main Deck: Sideboard:

4 Bogardan Hellkite
2 Hunted Dragon

4 Dragonstorm
4 Lotus Bloom
4 Telling Time
4 Seething Song
4 Sleight of Hand
4 Rite of Flame
4 Gigadrowse
4 Remand

1 Dreadship Reef
1 Calciform Pools
8 Island
4 Steam Vents
4 Mountain
4 Shivan Reef

1 Trickbind
3 Pyroclasm
1 Calciform Pools
2 Dreadship Reef
3 Ignorant Bliss
4 Repeal
1 Teferi, Mage of Zhalfir

The thirteenth Magic World Championship took place from 29 November – 3 December 2006 at the Carrousel du Louvre in Paris, France. The tournament featured Standard on Wednesday, Time Spiral Booster Draft on Thursday, and Extended on Friday. The team format was Time Spiral Team Rochester Draft.[24] Also on Wednesday Bob Maher, Dave Humpherys, Raphaël Lévy, Gary Wise, and Rob Dougherty were inducted into the Hall of Fame.

The winner of this tournament was Makihito Mihara, who defeated Ryou Ogura 3–0 in an all-Japanese final. He piloted a combo deck based on the card Dragonstorm. It is the first time players from the same country have been World Champion in back-to-back seasons. The Netherlands defeated Japan 2–0 in the team final. The total prize money awarded to the top 75 finishers was $255,245.[25]

Finishing Order
  1. Japan Makihito Mihara
  2. Japan Ryou Ogura
  3. Wales Nicholas Lovett
  4. France Gabriel Nassif
  5. Portugal Paulo Carvalho
  6. Brazil Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa
  7. Portugal Tiago Chan
  8. Japan Katsuhiro Mori
Team final
  1. Netherlands Netherlands – Kamiel Cornelissen, Julien Nuijten, Robert Van Medevoort
  2. Japan Japan – Katsuhiro Mori, Shuhei Yamamoto, Hidenori Katayama
Player of the Year
  1. Japan Shouta Yasooka
  2. Japan Shuhei Nakamura
  3. Brazil Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa
Rookie of the Year
  1. Germany Sebastian Thaler
Hall of Fame inductees

2007 World championship

(Complete Coverage)

Uri Peleg – 2007 World Championship
Doran Rock
Main Deck: Sideboard:

4 Birds of Paradise
4 Doran, the Siege Tower
1 Hypnotic Specter
3 Llanowar Elves
4 Ohran Viper
3 Shriekmaw
4 Tarmogoyf

2 Eyeblight's Ending
3 Garruk Wildspeaker
1 Liliana Vess
2 Nameless Inversion
2 Profane Command
4 Thoughtseize

1 Brushland
3 Caves of Koilos
1 Forest
2 Gemstone Mine
4 Gilt-Leaf Palace
1 Horizon Canopy
4 Llanowar Wastes
1 Pendelhaven
4 Treetop Village
2 Urborg, Tomb of Yawgmoth

2 Cloudthresher
2 Loxodon Warhammer
2 Nath of the Gilt-Leaf
1 Oblivion Ring
3 Riftsweeper
2 Serrated Arrows
1 Shriekmaw
2 Stupor

The fourteenth Magic World Championship took place from 6–9 December 2007 at the Jacob K. Javits Center of New York in New York City, USA. The tournament featured five rounds of Standard and a Lorwyn Booster Draft on Thursday. Friday featured five rounds of Legacy and another Lorwyn Booster Draft. The team format was Lorwyn Two-Headed Giant Booster Draft.[26] The top 64 individual finishers received $215,600 in prize money.

386 players from 61 countries competed in the event. The winner of the tournament was Uri Peleg, defeating Patrick Chapin 3–1 in the final. Katsuhiro Mori made the top 8 for the third consecutive year, while Gabriel Nassif made his third final eight within four Worlds. Coincidentally, each player mirrored their performance from the previous year (Mori was eliminated in the quarter-finals, Nassif in the semi-finals).[27]

Finishing Order
  1. Israel Uri Peleg
  2. United States Patrick Chapin
  3. France Gabriel Nassif
  4. Japan Koutarou Ootsuka
  5. Switzerland Cristoph Huber
  6. Japan Yoshitaka Nakano
  7. Japan Katsuhiro Mori
  8. Netherlands Roel van Heeswijk
Team final
  1. Switzerland Switzerland – Nico Bohny, Manuel Bucher, Christoph Huber, Raphael Gennari
  2. Austria Austria – Thomas Preyer, David Reitbauer, Stefan Stradner, Helmut Summersberger
Pro Tour Player of the Year
  1. Japan Tomoharu Saitou
  2. Japan Kenji Tsumura
  3. France Guillaume Wafo-Tapa
Rookie of the Year
  1. Japan Yuuya Watanabe
Hall of Fame inductees

2008 World championship

Antti Malin – 2008 World Championship
Faeries
Main Deck: Sideboard:

4 Mistbind Clique
2 Sower of Temptation
4 Spellstutter Sprite
2 Vendilion Clique

4 Agony Warp
4 Bitterblossom
3 Broken Ambitions
4 Cryptic Command
3 Remove Soul
1 Terror
4 Thoughtseize

1 Faerie Conclave
6 Island
4 Mutavault
4 Secluded Glen
4 Sunken Ruins
2 Swamp
4 Underground River

4 Flashfreeze
2 Glen Elendra Archmage
4 Infest
2 Jace Beleren
1 Mind Shatter
1 Ponder
1 Sower of Temptation

(Official coverage)

The fifteenth Magic World Championship took place from 11–14 December 2008 at the Memphis Cook Convention Center in Memphis, TN, USA. The tournament featured six rounds of Standard play on Thursday, two Shards of Alara Booster Drafts with three rounds of Swiss each on Friday, six rounds of Extended on Saturday, and the finals on Sunday. Also the national teams played two rounds of team constructed each on Thursday and Saturday with the Top 4 teams advancing to the single elimination finals on Sunday. The team format was 3 Person Team Constructed with one player playing Standard, one Extended, and one Legacy.[28] The top 75 individual finishers received $245,245 in prize money.[29]

329 players from 57 countries competed in the event. Antti Malin from Finland won the tournament, thereby claiming the first prize of $45,000. In the team final the United States defeated Australia to become the team champion.

Individual
  1. Finland Antti Malin
  2. United States Jamie Parke
  3. Japan Tsuyoshi Ikeda
  4. Estonia Hannes Kerem
  5. Brazil Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa
  6. Japan Kenji Tsumura
  7. Netherlands Frank Karsten
  8. Japan Akira Asahara
Team Competition
  1. United States United States – Michael Jacob, Samuel Black, Paul Cheon
  2. Australia Australia – Aaron Nicastri, Brandon Lau, Justin Cheung
  3. Brazil Brazil – Willy Edel, Vagner Casatti, Luiz Guilherme de Michielli
  4. Japan Japan – Yuuya Watanabe, Masashi Oiso, Akihiro Takakuwa

Pro Player of the Year

  1. Japan Shuhei Nakamura
  2. France Olivier Ruel
  3. United States Luis Scott-Vargas
Rookie of the Year
  1. Australia Aaron Nicastri
Hall of Fame inductees

2009 World championship

André Coimbra – 2009 World Championship
Naya Lightsaber
Main Deck: Sideboard:

4 Baneslayer Angel
4 Bloodbraid Elf
4 Noble Hierarch
4 Ranger of Eos
1 Scute Mob
4 Wild Nacatl
4 Woolly Thoctar

3 Ajani Vengeant
4 Lightning Bolt
4 Path to Exile

4 Arid Mesa
4 Forest
3 Mountain
1 Oran-Rief, the Vastwood
4 Plains
4 Rootbound Crag
4 Sunpetal Grove

1 Ajani Vengeant
2 Burst Lightning
4 Celestial Purge
4 Goblin Ruinblaster
4 Great Sable Stag

(Official coverage)

The sixteenth Magic World Championship took place from 19–22 November 2009 at the Palazzo Dei Congressi in Rome, Italy. The tournament featured six rounds of Standard play on Thursday, two Zendikar Booster Drafts with three rounds of Swiss each on Friday, six rounds of Extended on Saturday and the finals on Sunday. Also, the national teams played two rounds of team constructed each on Thursday and Saturday with the Top 4 teams advancing to the single elimination finals on Sunday. The team format was 3 Person Team Constructed with one player playing Standard, one Extended, and one Legacy.

409 players from 65 countries competed in the event. André Coimbra from Portugal won the tournament, thereby claiming the first prize of $45,000. In the team final, China defeated Austria to become the team champion. This was the first Magic Pro Tour event of any sort in which no player in the Top 8 was from the United States or Japan. It was also the first time a Pro Tour Top 8 consisted of players from eight different countries.

The Magic Online World Championship was held for the first time. It also took place in Rome at the site of the paper Magic World Championship. The tournament was previously announced to be for eight competitors. The qualifications could be gained in special tournaments on Magic Online. The players played three rounds each of Classic, Zendikar Booster Draft, and Standard on computers provided on the site. After nine rounds the two best players determined the title in a final match of Standard.[30] Anssi Myllymäki (screen name: Anathik) of Finland defeated former Pro Player of the Year Shouta Yasooka (yaya3) in the final, thus claiming the grand prize of $13,000.[31] The other contestans won between $4,000 and $9,000.[30]

Individual
  1. Portugal André Coimbra
  2. Austria David Reitbauer
  3. Malaysia Terry Soh
  4. Netherlands Bram Snepvangers
  5. Italy William Cavaglieri
  6. Switzerland Manuel Bucher
  7. Belgium Marijn Lybaert
  8. Germany Florian Pils
Team Competition
  1. China China – Bo Li, Wu Tong, Zhiyang Zhang
  2. Austria Austria – Benedikt Klauser, Bernhard Lehner, Benjamin Rozhon
  3. Czech Republic Czech Republic – Lucas Blohon, Lukas Jakolvsky, Jan Kotrla
  4. Netherlands Netherlands – Kevin Grove, Niels Noorlander, Tom van Lamoen

Pro Player of the Year

  1. Japan Yuuya Watanabe
  2. Japan Tomoharu Saito
  3. Czech Republic Martin Juza
Rookie of the Year
  1. Germany Lino Burgold
Hall of Fame inductees
  • France Antoine Ruel
  • Netherlands Kamiel Cornelissen
  • Netherlands Frank Karsten
Magic Online World Champion
  • Finland Anssi Myllymäki

2010 World championship

Guillaume Matignon – 2010 World Championship
Blue-Black Control
Main Deck: Sideboard:

3 Grave Titan
2 Sea Gate Oracle

1 Cancel
2 Consume the Meek
2 Disfigure
2 Doom Blade
1 Duress
3 Inquisition of Kozilek
2 Jace Beleren
4 Jace, the Mind Sculptor
4 Mana Leak
4 Preordain
4 Spreading Seas

4 Creeping Tar Pit
4 Darkslick Shores
4 Drowned Catacomb
5 Island
1 Misty Rainforest
3 Swamp
4 Tectonic Edge
1 Verdant Catacombs

1 Deprive
2 Disfigure
1 Doom Blade
2 Duress
2 Flashfreeze
3 Memoricide
3 Ratchet Bomb
1 Sorin Markov

(Official coverage)

The seventeenth World Championship took place from 9–12 December in Makuhari Messe in Chiba, Japan.[32] The tournament consisted of six rounds of Standard on Thursday, two Scars of Mirrodin Booster Drafts of three rounds each on Friday, and six rounds of Extended on Saturday. On Sunday the best eight players gathered for the Top 8. They had to play the same decks, they used in the Standard portion of the tournament. Also, the national teams played two rounds of team constructed each on Thursday and Saturday with the Top 2 teams advancing to the single elimination finals on Sunday. The team format is 3 Person Team Constructed with one player playing Standard, one Extended, and one Legacy.

352 players from 60 countries competed in the event.[33] The national teams competition had 57 countries represented.

The 2010 World Champion Guillaume Matignon earned enough pro points with his performance to equal Pro Player of the Year leader Brad Nelson's total. This led to a play-off for the Pro Player of the Year title at Pro Tour Paris 2011, which was ultimately won by Brad Nelson.

Individual
  1. France Guillaume Matignon
  2. France Guillaume Wafo-Tapa
  3. Brazil Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa
  4. Sweden Love Janse
  5. United States Eric Froehlich
  6. Czech Republic Lukas Jaklovsky
  7. Austria Christopher Wolf
  8. England Jonathan Randle
Team Competition
  1. Slovakia Slovakia – Ivan Floch, Robert Jurkovic, Patrik Surab
  2. Australia Australia – Adam Witton, Ian Wood, Jeremy Neeman

Pro Player of the Year

  1. United States Brad Nelson
  2. France Guillaume Matignon
  3. Brazil Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa
Rookie of the Year
  1. Italy Andrea Giarola
Hall of Fame inductees
Magic Online World Champion
  • Brazil Carlos Romão

2011 World championship

Jun'ya Iyanaga – 2011 World Championship
Wolf Run Ramp
Main Deck: Sideboard:

1 Birds of Paradise
4 Inferno Titan
4 Primeval Titan
4 Solemn Simulacrum
1 Thrun, the Last Troll

2 Devil's Play
4 Galvanic Blast
2 Green Sun's Zenith
4 Rampant Growth
1 Shock
3 Slagstorm
4 Sphere of the Suns

4 Copperline Gorge
5 Forest
4 Inkmoth Nexus
3 Kessig Wolf Run
6 Mountain
4 Rootbound Crag

2 Ancient Grudge
4 Autumn's Veil
1 Beast Within
1 Slagstorm
2 Sword of Feast and Famine
2 Thrun, the Last Troll
2 Tree of Redemption
1 Viridian Corrupter

(Official coverage)

The eighteenth Magic World Championship was held from 17-20 November in the Fort Mason Center in San Francisco, USA,[34] the same site that already hosted the 2004 World Championship. The tournament will consist of six rounds of Standard on Thursday, two Innistrad Booster Drafts of three rounds each on Friday, and six rounds of Modern on Saturday. As such, this will be the first World Championship to feature the new Modern format. On Sunday, the Top 8 players will play-off against each other, using the Standard decks they played on Thursday. 375 players from 60 countries competed in the event.[35]

The swiss rounds were dominated by American player Conley Woods, who would go 16-2 with his only loses being tactical concessions to other ChannelFireball teammates. Ultimately, four ChannelFireball teammates would make it into the Top 8, Conley Woods, Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa, Luis Scott-Vargas and Josh Utter-Leyton. For Paulo this was his fourth World Championship Top 8, making him the first player to achieve this, and his eight Pro Tour Top 8 overall. Also, for the first time players playing in the Magic Online World Championships managed to make the Top 8 of the Pro Tour, with Jun’ya Iyanaga (SEVERUS on MTGO) and David Caplan (goobafish on MTGO) making it to Sunday.

In the team event, Japan played against Norway for the World Team Title. The Japanese team of Ryuichiro Ishida, Tomoya Fujimoto,and former World Champion Makihito Mihara were victorious.

In the Magic Online World Championship finals, Reid Duke (reidderrabbit on MTGO) played against Florian Pils (flying man on MTGO) in the Modern format. Reid Duke won the match 2-1 to become the Magic Online World Champion, the first American and the first Magic Online Player of the Year to win the title.

Individual
  1. Japan Jun'ya Iyanaga
  2. England Richard Bland
  3. United States Conley Woods
  4. Canada David Caplan
  5. Brazil Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa
  6. United States Luis Scott-Vargas
  7. United States Josh Utter-Leyton
  8. United States Craig Wescoe
Team Competition
  1. Japan Japan – Ryuichiro Ishida, Tomoya Fujimoto, Makihito Mihara
  2. Norway Norway – Sveinung Bjørnerud , Kristoffer Jonassen, Andreas Nordahl
Pro Player of the Year
  1. United States Owen Turtenwald
  2. United States Luis Scott-Vargas
  3. Czech Republic Martin Juza
Rookie of the Year
  1. United States Matthias Hunt
Hall of Fame inductees
  • Japan Shuhei Nakamura
  • Sweden Anton Jonsson
  • United States Steven O'Mahoney-Schwartz
Magic Online World Champion
  • United States Reid Duke

2012 World championship

The nineteenth Magic World Championship will be held from the 16-19 August at Gen Con 2012 in Indianapolis.[4] For the first time the World Championships will not be a Pro Tour-sized event and instead be an exclusive sixteen-person tournament. The changes were designed to make the World Championship more prestigious and meaningful as the tournament will now replace the Pro Player of the Year title. Wizards of the Coast stated in their announcement of the changes that 'For the first time, since the creation of the Pro Tour, Magic: The Gathering will have a single tournament to determine the best player in the world: the 2012 World Championship'.[4]

Performance by country

Japan and the United States are tied for the most individual titles won. The United States have won the most team titles and also have had most competitors amongst the final eight. Germany and the Netherlands are the only other countries with more than one champion. Italy and Austria are the most successful nations that have never won a title.

Country Wins Top 8 Team Wins
United States United States 3 34 8
Japan Japan 3 16 2
Germany Germany 2 9 2
Netherlands Netherlands 2 8 1
Switzerland Switzerland 1 3 1
France France 1 12 0
Finland Finland 1 6 0
Brazil Brazil 1 5 0
Portugal Portugal 1 5 0
Czech Republic Czech Republic 1 3 0
Australia Australia 1 1 0
Israel Israel 1 1 0
Canada Canada 0 7 1
Slovakia Slovakia 0 1 1
China China 0 0 1
Austria Austria 0 5 0
Italy Italy 0 5 0
Sweden Sweden 0 3 0
Belgium Belgium 0 2 0
England England 0 2 0
Estonia Estonia 0 1 0

As of 20 November 2011 (2011 -11-20)

References

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