NZR DL class


NZR DL class
NZR DL class
DL 9020 on a freight train near Papakura, Auckland
Power type Diesel
Builder Dalian Locomotive and Rolling Stock (CNR Group)
Order number 40
Model CKD-9B
Build date first 20 : 2009–2011
second 20 : 2011– †
UIC classification Co-Co
Gauge 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm)
Length 18.5 metres (61 ft) over drawgear
18.12 metres (59.4 ft) over body
Axle load 18 tonnes (18 long tons; 20 short tons)
Locomotive weight 108 tonnes (106 long tons; 119 short tons)
Prime mover MTU 20V 4000R43‡
Alternator Yongji Electric Machine Factory JF205 Series
Traction motors Yongji Electric Machine Factory ZD126C
Power output engine 2,700 kilowatts (3,600 hp)‡
Locomotive brakes Wabtec 26L Pneumatic Air Brake
Class DL
Delivered November 2010 (1st batch – 6 units)[1]
June 2011 (2nd batch – 14 units)[2]
Current owner KiwiRail
Notes
Sources: ‡[3] , †[4] , others[5]

The NZR DL class is a class of diesel-electric locomotives manufactured for KiwiRail by Dalian Locomotive and Rolling Stock Company with engines from MTU. They are the most powerful diesel-electric locomotives in service in New Zealand.[5]

20 locomotives were ordered in 2009 and delivered between 2010 and 2011, a further 20 units were ordered in 2011 for delivery in 2012.[6]

At introduction they were the first new diesel-electric locomotives to enter service on the New Zealand railway network in 30 years.[n 1] The purchase of the locomotives marks one of the first steps of considerable investment in KiwiRail,[7] as well as the first export order for a Chinese-built locomotive to a western country.[8]

Contents

Background history

The acquisition of new locomotives for the rail network was first proposed by Toll NZ after they purchased Tranz Rail in 2003.[9] When Toll assumed responsibility for the operation of the rail network, a new crown business was created to own and maintain the track assets; ONTRACK. However, after several years of negotiations between Toll and ONTRACK, the two parties could not come to an agreement on the amount that Toll should pay for access to the rail network (track access fees). Accordingly, Toll did not purchase any new locomotives while the track access issue remained unsolved. In July 2008, the fifth Labour Government purchased Toll Rail from Toll, renamed it KiwiRail, and merged ONTRACK into it, creating one company that controls both operations and rail infrastructure. A couple of weeks after the new company was officially launched, then State Owned Enterprises Minister Trevor Mallard announced that the government was investigating the possibility of assembling new locomotives at United Group’s Hutt Workshops facility from imported parts.[10]

Following the election of the fifth National government in November 2008, the railways investment programme initiated by the previous administration was suspended pending a review. In March 2009, the government announced that it had authorised KiwiRail to invest $115m in new rolling stock. These funds were allocated to the purchase of 20 new locomotives ($75m) and carriages for the Tranz Scenic services ($40m).[7] The locomotives were to be built in China by Dalian Locomotive and Rolling Stock (CNR Group) and imported ready-assembled. It was explained that the decision to import the locomotives, rather than build them locally as had been investigated by the previous government, was made primarily for two reasons: cost and time-to-service.[citation needed]

A further 20 units were ordered in June 2011.[4]

Service

Introduction and tests

The first 6 of the first batch of 20 locomotives arrived in New Zealand at Mount Maunganui on 20 November 2010,[1] and were moved to Te Rapa, Hamilton three days later for the commissioning and driver training process to take place.[11] A ceremony to mark the commissioning of the new locomotives was held at Te Rapa during the morning of Friday the 10 December. The service was attended by many KiwiRail staff, including CEO Jim Quinn. Guests included Prime Minister John Key and Minister of Transport Steven Joyce, whose government's investment in KiwiRail made the purchase of new locomotives possible. CNR officials were also present, with the chairman of CNR Cui Diangao explaining to media that the supply of locomotives to KiwiRail is the first time that Chinese locomotives have been exported to a developed country.[12]

The first six were used for driver training and rail system compliance testing,[4] the New Zealand Transport Agency gave the locomotives certification for New Zealand in May 2011.[2]

The remaining 14 of the first batch had been manufactured by April 2011,[13] and were shipped by the Tasman Trader, to arrive in Auckland in June 2011.[2]

Operations

The locomotives will be deployed into freight service, on services currently hauled by two locomotives and/or on services where having a double cab locomotive is particularly beneficial to operations.[14]

Criticism

The idea of building the locomotives in New Zealand as advocated by the previous Fifth Labour Government was promoted as a way of creating jobs at a time when the economy was entering a recession and unemployment was rising. Critics of the idea pointed out that New Zealand did not possess the necessary skilled labour in sufficient quantity for such a construction programme to proceed in a timely manner, and had not done so for several decades since the New Zealand Government Railways ceased building its own locomotives. The alternative of importing locomotives was billed as the quickest way to obtain the necessary new motive power. A review also found that locally built locomotives would be some 70% more expensive than purchasing from CNR.[15]

Critics also questioned the potential reliability of the locomotives to be purchased,[5] citing a case of Dalian-built locomotives in Malaysia encountering a number of initial technical problems (see KTM Class 29).[16]

On delivery the railway workers union (RMTU) raised concerns over cab visibility, and the locomotive's weight; KiwiRail have confirmed that the locomotive weighs 105t, and that the cab meets US standards, and is the same as used in a number of other countries – they also pointed out that the design reflected the need for the cab to be as strong as possible.[17][18]

Design

The DL locomotives use a 2.7MW German built MTU 20V 4000R43 engine, which is expected to have 5–10% increased fuel efficiency over the previous locomotive fleet,[4] Wabtec braking equipment, and ZD126C traction motors. The cab layout incorporates design elements from the British Rail Class 60 with a near central pedestal controller.[19]

Class register

Key: In service Out of service Auckland Transport service Preserved Overhaul Scrapped
TMS No. Introduced Current Livery Status Allocated to Notes
DL 9008 02010-11 November 2010 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9014 02010-11 November 2010 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9020 02010-11 November 2010 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9037 02010-11 November 2010 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9043 02010-11 November 2010 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9066 02010-11 November 2010 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9072 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9089 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9095 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9106 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9112 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9129 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9135 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9141 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9158 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9164 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9170 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9187 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9193 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island
DL 9204 02011-06 June 2011 KiwiRail In service North Island

See also

  • KTM Class 29, similar locomotives manufactured by Dalian Locomotive Company

References

  1. ^ a b Jon C. (11 November 2010). "First New DL Locos Arrive". www.aucklandtrains.co.nz. http://www.aucklandtrains.co.nz/2010/11/21/photos-first-new-dx-locos-arrive/. 
  2. ^ a b c "DL Locos Arrive Soon". www.aucklandtrains.co.nz. 25 May 2011. http://www.aucklandtrains.co.nz/2011/05/25/dl-locos-arrive-soon/. 
  3. ^ "Strategic engine delivery begins". www.railwaygazette.com. Railway Gazette International. 7 October 2009. http://www.railwaygazette.com/nc/news/single-view/view/strategic-engine-delivery-begins.html. 
  4. ^ a b c d "KiwiRail orders more Chinese locomotives". www.railwaygazette.com. Railway Gazette International. 27 June 2011. http://www.railwaygazette.com/nc/news/single-view/view/kiwirail-orders-more-chinese-locomotives.html. 
  5. ^ a b c "New Horses On The Horizon". New Zealand Railfan (Mosgiel: Triple M Publications) 15 (2): 5. March 2009. ISSN 1173-2229. 
  6. ^ "KiwiRail Orders Another 20 Chinese Locomotives". Otago Daily Times. 20 July 2011. http://www.odt.co.nz/news/business/169995/kiwirail-orders-another-20-chinese-locomotives. Retrieved 22 July 2011. 
  7. ^ a b "$115m approved for KiwiRail". www.stuff.co.nz. NZPA (New Zealand: Fairfax New Zealand). 2 March 2009. http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/1765489/115m-approved-for-KiwiRail. Retrieved 10 April 2009. 
  8. ^ "KiwiRail's first Chinese locomotive arrives next month". railwaygazette.com. Railway Gazette International. 22 September 2010. http://www.railwaygazette.com/nc/news/single-view/view/kiwirails-first-chinese-locomotive-arrives-next-month.html. 
  9. ^ "Billion-dollar buyback". The Dominion Post. 25 May 2008. http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/403789. 
  10. ^ "Govt may assemble Kiwirail locomotives in NZ". www.stuff.co.nz. NZPA (New Zealand: Fairfax New Zealand). 13 July 2008. http://www.stuff.co.nz//531008. Retrieved 10 April 2009. 
  11. ^ Jon C. (23 November 2010). "Photos: DLs Towed To Te Rapa". aucklandtrains.co.nz. http://www.aucklandtrains.co.nz/2010/11/23/photos-dls-towed-to-te-rapa/. 
  12. ^ "KiwiRail gets early Christmas present". www.3news.co.nz (TV3 (New Zealand)). 10 December 2010. http://www.3news.co.nz/KiwiRail-gets-early-Christmas-present/tabid/423/articleID/190327/Default.aspx. Retrieved 27 June 2011. 
  13. ^ "4月7日 大连造20台内燃机车全部交付新西兰" (in chinese). www.lnnews.com. 8 April 2011. http://www.lnnews.net/html/2011/04/08/177064.html. 
  14. ^ Andrea Vance (15 November 2010). "Locomotives due are first in decades". NZPA. http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/4343691/Locomotives-due-are-first-in-decades. Retrieved 15 November 2010. 
  15. ^ "NZ built locomotives 70% more expensive". KiwiRail (NZ: KiwiRail). 14 December 2010. http://www.kiwirail.co.nz/index.php?mact=News,cntnt01,detail,0&cntnt01articleid=49&cntnt01origid=15&cntnt01returnid=58. Retrieved 14 December 2010. 
  16. ^ "Readymade Train Wreck". www.mmail.com.my. The Malay Mail. 10 October 2008. Archived from the original on 13 October 2011. http://web.archive.org/web/20081013081610/http://www.mmail.com.my/Readymade_train_wreck.aspx. 
  17. ^ "New locomotives too heavy, says union". nz.news.yahoo.com. 16 December 2010. http://nz.news.yahoo.com/a/-/top-stories/8524748/new-locomotives-too-heavy-says-union/3/. 
  18. ^ "Major problems with new locomotives: union". www.odt.co.nz (Otago Daily Times). 16 December 2010. http://www.odt.co.nz/news/national/141097/major-problems-new-locomotives-union. 
  19. ^ "Loco drivers get feel for new loco cab". Express (KiwiRail Staff Newsletter) (21): 1. 19 November 2009. http://d.yimg.com/kq/groups/6643079/590954763/name/Express_Issue21.pdf. 

Sources

  • "Down at the Station". The New Zealand Railway Observer (Wellington: New Zealand Railway and Locomotive Society) 66 (1): 31. April – May 2009. ISSN 0028-8624. 

Notes

  1. ^ The previous class of diesel-electric locomotives to enter service in New Zealand being the DF class which entered service between 1979–1981

External links


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