National Register of Historic Places listings in Albany, New York


National Register of Historic Places listings in Albany, New York
The city of Albany with NHRP listings identified by pinpoints

The National Register of Historic Places listings in Albany, New York represent the history of Albany from the Dutch colonial era, through the British colonial era, the American Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, and World War II, in addition to various periods of immigration into New York's capital. There are 58 listings on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in Albany, 14 of which are National Register Historic Districts plus 5 National Historic Landmarks. The sites illustrate the city's architectural heritage, colonial history, transportation advancements, as well as general economic, religious, and infrastructure growth in the city. Because Albany is the state's capital, many of its NRHP sites are municipal in nature. Three sites have former military significance.

The NRHP is the United States government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation. A property listed on the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. Sites are nominated by owners or other interested parties. Nominations are processed by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (NYSOPRHP) and selected by the National Park Service (NPS), a branch of the Department of the Interior.

The oldest site on the Register in the city is the site of the Dutch-built Fort Orange (1624). Continuing into the colonial era, the Register includes mansions of successful land and business owners of the time as well as a notable general of the American Revolutionary War. The 19th century brought a boom in transportation in Albany, leading to both economic and population growth. Immigrants developed tight-knit neighborhoods, many of which now comprise the city's 14 historic districts. Churches, eight of which are listed, sprung up to meet the needs of the new population. State and federal government are responsible for seven of the listed properties (from municipal buildings to armories to one Navy destroyer escort). City government built at least three of the sites on the Register. The turn of the 20th century saw the building of a grand train station. Later in the century a vaudeville theatre, railcar diner, and two distinct neighborhoods were built and later recognized on the Register.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted November 18, 2011.[1]
Landmark name Image Date listed Location Neighborhood Summary
1 Abrams Building Abrams Building Albany 1979.png 01980-02-14 February 14, 1980 55–57 S. Pearl St.
42°38′53″N 73°45′15″W / 42.64806°N 73.75417°W / 42.64806; -73.75417 (Abrams Building)
Downtown At the time it was listed, it was one of the few commercial buildings downtown that retained its original storefront.[2] In 1987 it was demolished to make way for what is now the Times Union Center.[3]
2 The Albany Academy Old Albany Academy 2.jpg 01971-02-18 February 18, 1971 Academy Park
42°39′10.94″N 73°45′17.77″W / 42.6530389°N 73.7549361°W / 42.6530389; -73.7549361 (The Albany Academy)
Downtown Philip Hooker designed the original home of the Albany Academy, one of his two remaining buildings in the city. Now used as office space for the city school district, it is known as the Joseph Henry Memorial after the scientist (and then-professor)[4] who built the first electric motor in 1829.[5]
3 Albany City Hall AlbanyNYCityHall.jpg 01972-09-04 September 4, 1972 Eagle Street at Maiden Lane
42°39′6.28″N 73°45′15.96″W / 42.6517444°N 73.7544333°W / 42.6517444; -73.7544333 (Albany City Hall)
Downtown Designed by Henry Hobson Richardson in his particular Romanesque style, this 1883 structure dates to the period that is typically regarded as Richardson's architectural peak.[6] In 1927, the first municipal carillon in the US was added to the building's tower, having been financed by small donations by more than 25,000 residents.[7]
4 Albany Institute of History & Art Albany Institute of History and Art Panorama.jpg 01976-07-12 July 12, 1976 135 Washington Ave.
42°39′20.89″N 73°45′36.52″W / 42.6558028°N 73.7601444°W / 42.6558028; -73.7601444 (Albany Institute of History and Art)
Washington Avenue Founded by the merger of two separate science, and history and art societies in 1824, the Albany Institute is housed in two connected buildings. The older of the two is the Rice House, a Beaux arts-style mansion with a yellow Roman brick façade and 16th-century palazzo accents. It is the only freestanding Beaux Arts mansion in Albany. In 1907, the Institute added a similar structure for offices and collections.[8] Between 1999 and 2001, a $17.5 million capital project added an atrium to connect the original two buildings and renovated much of the older buildings.[9]
5 Albany Union Station Albany Union Station 2.jpg 01971-02-18 February 18, 1971 East side of Broadway between Columbia and Steuben streets
42°39′5.18″N 73°44′57.77″W / 42.6514389°N 73.7493806°W / 42.6514389; -73.7493806 (Albany Union Station)
Downtown Built during 1899–1900, this Beaux-Arts design was essential to the economic growth of Albany in the early 20th century. A symbol of progress to locals, the station also "provided an ultra-modern first impression" to visitors and potential investors.[10] The station closed in 1968 and remained so until Norstar Bank renovated the building and moved in in 1986. After several acquisitions, Norstar's parent company Bank of America moved out of the building in 2009.[11] It currently stands vacant.
6 Arbor Hill Historic District – Ten Broeck Triangle Ten Broek Triangle.jpg 01979-01-25 January 25, 1979; expanded 01984-09-29 September 29, 1984 Irregular pattern along Ten Broeck Street from Clinton Avenue to Livingston Avenue
42°39′25.86″N 73°45′6.98″W / 42.6571833°N 73.7519389°W / 42.6571833; -73.7519389 (Arbor Hill Historic District--Ten Broeck Triangle)
Arbor Hill Albany's 19th-century industrialists and merchants built stately homes in this intact 34-acre (14 ha) enclave south of the Ten Broeck Mansion. Two large churches serve as focal points.[12] A 1984 westward expansion of the district boundaries more than doubled its size.[13]
7 Benjamin Walworth Arnold House and Carriage House Benjamin Walworth Arnold House.jpg 01982-07-26 July 26, 1982 465 State St. and 307 Washington Ave.
42°39′30.83″N 73°46′6.83″W / 42.6585639°N 73.7685639°W / 42.6585639; -73.7685639 (Arnold, Benjamin Walworth, House and Carriage House)
Washington Avenue Stanford White's early use of the Colonial Revival style for this house of a local lumberman and financier attracted considerable notice when it was built in 1905. The two are his only buildings in Albany.[14]
8 Broadway – Livingston Avenue Historic District Broadway-Livingston Avenue Historic District.jpg 01988-01-07 January 7, 1988 Broadway and Livingston Avenue
42°39′27.51″N 73°44′53.33″W / 42.6576417°N 73.7481472°W / 42.6576417; -73.7481472 (Broadway--Livingston Avenue Historic District)
Arbor Hill and North Albany The 20 buildings that surround this intersection comprise the only remaining intact 19th-century commercial-residential cluster on north Broadway. A 1900 Warren Truss railroad bridge is a contributing structure.[15]
9 Buildings at 744, 746, 748, 750 Broadway 744-750 Broadway Albany Morning.jpg 01987-12-17 December 17, 1987 744–750 Broadway
42°39′22.74″N 73°44′55.42″W / 42.6563167°N 73.7487278°W / 42.6563167; -73.7487278 (Buildings at 744, 746, 748, 750 Broadway)
Arbor Hill These four row houses, built 1833–1870, are the only that remain of the many that once lined this section of Broadway.[16]
10 Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church.jpg 02008-02-28 February 28, 2008 715 Morris St.
42°39′53.36″N 73°47′30.91″W / 42.6648222°N 73.7919194°W / 42.6648222; -73.7919194 (Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church)
Pine Hills This church was notable during the development of the Pine Hills neighborhood, having served an important cultural function during the neighborhood's massive growth in the early 1900s. It is also an example of an early 20th-century Collegiate Gothic brick church.[17]
11 Cathedral of All Saints CathedralOfAllSaintsAlbany.jpg 01974-07-25 July 25, 1974 South Swan Street
42°39′16.77″N 73°45′28.07″W / 42.6546583°N 73.7577972°W / 42.6546583; -73.7577972 (Cathedral of All Saints)
Downtown Robert W. Gibson, then relatively unknown, beat out Henry Hobson Richardson in 1884 for this commission, a cathedral long sought by the wealthy families in Albany's Episcopal diocese. The most ambitious plan for an Episcopal cathedral in its time, it was never finished. The construction of the nearby Education Department building almost three decades later, where its rear would have been, made it unlikely that it ever will.[18]
12 Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Panorama 1.jpg 01976-06-08 June 8, 1976 125 Eagle St.
42°38′51.73″N 73°45′35.72″W / 42.6477028°N 73.7599222°W / 42.6477028; -73.7599222 (Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception)
Mansion District Designed by Patrick Keeley and built in 1848-52, the Cathedral was the second to be built in New York after St. Patrick's and is an excellent example of American Gothic ecclesiastical architecture of the time. It represents the growth in power of the Catholic Church in Albany during the early and mid 1800s and currently stands in contrast with its more contemporary neighbor, the Empire State Plaza.[19]
13 Center Square/Hudson–Park Historic District AlbanyNewYork.jpg 01980-03-18 March 18, 1980 Roughly bounded by Park Avenue, State, Lark and South Swan streets.
42°39′9.53″N 73°45′51.05″W / 42.6526472°N 73.7641806°W / 42.6526472; -73.7641806 (Center Square/Hudson-Park Historic District)
Center Square and Hudson/Park This 27-block area west of the Empire State Plaza has a diverse collection of 19th- and early 20th-century buildings in contemporary architectural styles by both prominent and vernacular architects. Most are rowhouses, with some churches and office and industrial buildings included.[20]
14 Cherry Hill Cherry Hill Albany.jpg 01971-02-18 February 18, 1971 S. Pearl St. between 1st and McCarthy Aves.
42°38′5.33″N 73°45′48.61″W / 42.6348139°N 73.7635028°W / 42.6348139; -73.7635028 (Cherry Hill)
South End Built by Colonel Philip van Rensselaer in 1768 for his wife Maria Sanders (granddaughter of Albany's first mayor Pieter Schuyler), this colonial home remained in the Van Rensselaer family for nearly two centuries. The house offers a unique opportunity to see family heirlooms that remained in the house for hundreds of years.[21]
15 Church of the Holy Innocents Church of the Holy Innocents.jpg 01978-01-31 January 31, 1978 275 N. Pearl St.
42°39′31.83″N 73°44′53.78″W / 42.6588417°N 73.7482722°W / 42.6588417; -73.7482722 (Church of the Holy Innocents)
Arbor Hill An early example of the Gothic Revival style of architecture in America, this 1850 church was originally Episcopal but was most recently Russian Orthodox (for which an onion dome was added on the roof). Noted for its John Bolton-designed stained glass windows, the church was located in "the most fashionable area of Albany during the 1840s and 1850s."[22] It is currently abandoned.
16 Clinton Avenue Historic District Houses on Clinton Avenue, Albany, NY.jpg 01988-09-01 September 1, 1988 Along Clinton Avenue from Quail to North Pearl streets
42°39′39.64″N 73°45′41.94″W / 42.6610111°N 73.76165°W / 42.6610111; -73.76165 (Clinton Avenue Historic District)
Arbor Hill This 1.5-mile (2.4 km) stretch of Clinton, and some side streets, has the largest concentration of 19th-century rowhouses in Albany, accounting for 92% of almost 600 buildings.[23]
17 Delaware and Hudson Railroad Company Building SUNYAdminBuildingAlbany.jpg 01972-03-16 March 16, 1972 The Plaza on State Street
42°38′53.11″N 73°44′58.25″W / 42.6480861°N 73.7495139°W / 42.6480861; -73.7495139 (Delaware and Hudson Railroad Company Building)
Downtown One of Albany's most distinctive landmarks, Marcus T. Reynolds' 1914 copy of the Cloth Hall tower in Ypres, Belgium,[24] is often taken by visitors to be the state capitol.[25] It and the Plaza in front were the only elements of a City Beautiful-inspired plan for downtown Albany actually built.[26] In addition to the railroad, a newspaper occupied the southern wing, built later. Today it serves as the main administration building for the State University of New York.[27]
18 Downtown Albany Historic District North Pearl Street Albany.jpg 01980-01-31 January 31, 1980 Bound by Broadway, State, Pine, Lodge and Columbia streets
42°39′1.63″N 73°45′7.6″W / 42.6504528°N 73.752111°W / 42.6504528; -73.752111 (Downtown Albany Historic District)
Downtown Downtown is the oldest settled area of Albany, and still retains the street plan established within its 17th-century stockade. The 13-block core of the city is home to many of its major commercial buildings, some of which are themselves listed on the Register.[28]
19 First Reformed Church Dutch Church Albany.jpg 01974-01-21 January 21, 1974 56 Orange St.
42°39′12.63″N 73°45′1.81″W / 42.6535083°N 73.7505028°W / 42.6535083; -73.7505028 (First Reformed Church)
Downtown The North Dutch Church was architect Philip Hooker's first major design.[29] The church's congregation was formed in 1634[29] and is noted for being the oldest Christian congregation in Upstate New York.[30] The building has been described as Albany's "most enduring landmark on [its] ever changing skyline." It is an important historical artifact from Albany's Dutch past and a rare example of Hooker's early work.[29]
20 First Trust Company Building First Trust Company Building Albany.jpg 01973-01-18 January 18, 1973 35 State St.
42°38′56.62″N 73°45′3.25″W / 42.6490611°N 73.7509028°W / 42.6490611; -73.7509028 (First Trust Company Building)
Downtown Marcus T. Reynolds designed this domed Beaux Arts commercial building in 1902. Located on the corner with Broadway, it is one of downtown's several focal points.[31]
21 Fort Orange Archeological Site Fort Orange Historical Marker.jpg 01993-11-04 November 4, 1993 Junction of I-787 and U.S. routes 9 and 20
42°38′41″N 73°45′1″W / 42.64472°N 73.75028°W / 42.64472; -73.75028 (Fort Orange Archeological Site)
Downtown The first permanent Dutch fort in New Netherland was located here in 1624. Abandoned by 1676, it became the nucleus of the future city of Albany. Archeological digs in 1970 uncovered the first 17th-century European artifacts from an intact Dutch colonial site.[32]
22 James Hall Office James Hall Office.jpg 01976-12-08 December 8, 1976 Lincoln Park
42°38′45″N 73°46′9″W / 42.64583°N 73.76917°W / 42.64583; -73.76917 (Hall, James, Office)
South End A rare non-park collaboration between Calvert Vaux and Frederick Law Olmsted resulted in this 1852 Italian villa-style building in Lincoln Park. It was used as office and storage space by James Hall, at one time New York's state geologist. The research he conducted here laid the foundations for modern North American paleontology.[33]
23 Harmanus Bleecker Library Harmanus Bleecker Library 1.jpg 01996-05-16 May 16, 1996 19 Dove St.
42°39′19.3″N 73°45′41.78″W / 42.655361°N 73.7616056°W / 42.655361; -73.7616056 (Harmanus Bleecker Library)
Washington Avenue This former library is a unique example of Classical Revival architecture from the 1920s in Albany. The building is noted as being the first building used solely as a library under the Albany Public Library System and represents a landmark in the history of public education in Albany.[34] Closed in the 1970s, the building was transformed into office space in 2003.[35]
24 Hook and Ladder No. 4 Hook and Ladder No. 4.jpg 02001-03-12 March 12, 2001 Delaware Avenue
42°38′29.76″N 73°46′46.67″W / 42.6416°N 73.7796306°W / 42.6416; -73.7796306 (Hook and Ladder No. 4)
Delaware Avenue Neighborhood Another notable work by Albany architect Marcus T. Reynolds, this 1912 brick structure is a rare example of early 20th century Dutch Revival architecture. As well as including a classic stepped gable, the building also features terra cotta sculptures that illustrate Albany's history; it is known as a true homage to the city's past designed by one of its life-long residents.[36]
25 Knox Street Historic District Knox Street Historic District.jpg 02008-03-05 March 5, 2008 Knox Street between Madison Avenue and Morris Street
42°39′11.4″N 73°46′14.11″W / 42.653167°N 73.7705861°W / 42.653167; -73.7705861 (Knox Street Historic District)
Park South Five separate building campaigns by the same contractor erected the 24 brick rowhouses on these two blocks west of Washington Square in the 1870s and '80s. They are more ornate and accomplished than other such clusters in the city. One Federal style wood frame house from 1838 is also included.[37]
26 Lafayette Park Historic District Elk Street Albany.jpg 01978-11-15 November 15, 1978 Roughly bounded by State, Swan, Elk, Spruce, Chapel and Eagle streets
42°39′11.01″N 73°45′19.26″W / 42.6530583°N 73.75535°W / 42.6530583; -73.75535 (Lafayette Park Historic)
Downtown City, county and state government buildings front this downtown park, creating Albany's civic core. Neighboring streets include intact rowhouses that were home to prominent families in the 19th and early 20th centuries.[38]
27 Miss Albany Diner (formerly Lil's Diner) Miss Albany Diner.JPG 02000-11-06 November 6, 2000 893 Broadway
42°39′39.08″N 73°44′41.32″W / 42.6608556°N 73.7448111°W / 42.6608556; -73.7448111 (Miss Albany Diner)
North Albany Originally named for its first owner Lil McCauliff, Miss Albany is a rare example of an intact railcar-style diner design dating from the early 1940s.[39] It underwent significant renovation in 1988 for use as a key set in the movie Ironweed; it was at this point the restaurant received the name Miss Albany. The diner is currently for sale.
28 Lustron Homes of Jermain Street Historic District Jermain Street Albany.JPG 02009-07-29 July 29, 2009 1, 3, 5, 7, 8 Jermain Street
42°40′45.05″N 73°48′3.64″W / 42.6791806°N 73.8010111°W / 42.6791806; -73.8010111 (Lustron Homes of Jermain Street Historic District)
The five prefabricated Lustron homes on this street are a rare surviving group reflecting the increasing suburbanization of the years after World War II. It is the largest contiguous district in the state with all homes fully intact.[40]
29 Mansion Historic District Houses on Grand and Madison streets, Albany, NY.jpg 01982-09-30 September 30, 1982 Roughly bounded by Park Avenue, Pearl, Eagle, and Hamilton streets
42°38′43.34″N 73°45′27.72″W / 42.6453722°N 73.7577°W / 42.6453722; -73.7577 (Mansion Historic District)
Mansion District Initially Albany's first suburban enclave, this neighborhood on the slopes below the governor's mansion was the first residence for the city's many immigrant groups during the 19th century.[41]
30 A. Mendelson and Son Company Building Mendelson and Son Company Building NE Corner.jpg 02003-06-06 June 6, 2003 40 Broadway
42°38′15.66″N 73°45′13.84″W / 42.6376833°N 73.7538444°W / 42.6376833; -73.7538444 (Mendelson, A., and Son Company Building)
Port of Albany Built after a 1904 fire destroyed the previous structure on the site, this is one of the few remaining intact early 20th-century industrial buildings in Albany's port area. It has seen no significant alterations and remains in use.[42]
31 Walter Merchant House Walter Merchant House.jpg 02002-03-06 March 6, 2002 188 Washington Ave.
42°39′22.27″N 73°45′46.04″W / 42.6561861°N 73.7627889°W / 42.6561861; -73.7627889 (Merchant, Walter, House)
Washington Avenue Noted as a rare local example of Italianate architecture in an urban setting, the Merchant House is one of the few of many of this design still standing. Its large carriage house is also increasingly rare in the city. The size of the mansion, in addition to its carriage house, represent the success of the building's first owner, who was one of Albany's wealthy 19th-century merchants.[43]
32 Stephen and Harriet Myers House Stephen and Harriet Myers House.jpg 02004-11-30 November 30, 2004 194 Livingston Ave.
42°39′39.78″N 73°45′15.96″W / 42.66105°N 73.7544333°W / 42.66105; -73.7544333 (Myers, Stephen and Harriet, House)
Arbor Hill Architecturally notable as a rare example of mid-nineteenth-century Gothic Revival townhouse design, the building was also prominent in the history of the Underground Railroad. During the 1850s, Stephen Myers was chairman of the Vigilance Committee, a group charged with safely helping African slaves on their way to Canada. The house was the headquarters of the Committee and home to the Myers during Stephen's chairmanship.[44]
33 New Scotland Avenue (Troop B) Armory New Scotland Avenue (Troop B) Armory 1.jpg 01994-01-28 January 28, 1994 130 New Scotland Ave.
42°39′8.41″N 73°46′52.97″W / 42.6523361°N 73.7813806°W / 42.6523361; -73.7813806 (New Scotland Avenue (Troop B) Armory)
University Heights Lewis Pilcher's 1914 Tudor Revival armory is one of only six extant in the state designed for a cavalry unit.[45]
34 New York State Executive Mansion New York State Executive Mansion.jpg 01971-02-18 February 18, 1971 138 Eagle St.
42°38′48.17″N 73°45′39.29″W / 42.6467139°N 73.7609139°W / 42.6467139; -73.7609139 (New York Executive Mansion)
Mansion District Built in 1860 as a private residence, the Governor's home was purchased by the State in 1883 for use as the state's executive mansion. It is the first and only state-owned building dedicated to housing the governor.[46] The Mansion Historic District's name originates from its proximity to the Executive Mansion.[47]
35 New York State Capitol NYSCapitolPanorama.jpg 01971-02-18 February 18, 1971 Capitol Park
42°39′9.23″N 73°45′26.45″W / 42.6525639°N 73.7573472°W / 42.6525639; -73.7573472 (New York State Capitol)
Downtown Commissioned in 1867, the seat of state government was not completed until 1898. During that time, its design was changed from French Renaissance Revival to Beaux Arts. One of ten U.S. state capitols without a dome, it and Philadelphia's City Hall are the last two large load-bearing structures built in the U.S.[48]
36 New York State Court of Appeals Building CourtofAppealsPano.jpg 01971-02-18 February 18, 1971 Eagle Street between Pine and Columbia streets
42°39′8.12″N 73°45′13.99″W / 42.6522556°N 73.7538861°W / 42.6522556; -73.7538861 (New York State Court of Appeals Building)
Downtown Now home to the state's highest court, this was built from 1834–42 to house it and several other state officers. The Greek Revival styling makes free use of all three major classical orders.[49]
37 New York State Department of Education Building NYSED Building Night 2.JPG 01971-03-18 March 18, 1971 Washington Avenue between Hawk and Swan streets
42°39′14.41″N 73°45′27.22″W / 42.6540028°N 73.7575611°W / 42.6540028; -73.7575611 (New York State Department of Education Building)
Downtown Henry Hornbostel's 1912 edifice was the first major building in the United States constructed solely for educational administration purposes. Until 1976 it also housed the state museum.[38]
38 Nut Grove Nut Grove.jpg 01974-07-30 July 30, 1974 90 McCarty Ave.
42°38′0.75″N 73°46′6.6″W / 42.6335417°N 73.7685°W / 42.6335417; -73.7685 (Nut Grove)
South End Alexander Jackson Davis's only Greek Revival house in the Hudson Valley is also a rare example of the Grecian country-house form within the style. After its 1845 construction, it remained in the family until 1903, when it was altered slightly and converted into a hospice, a use that continued until 1973.[50]
39 Old Post Office Old Post Office Albany Pano 2.jpg 01972-01-20 January 20, 1972 Northeast corner of Broadway and State Street
42°38′56.19″N 73°45′1.03″W / 42.6489417°N 73.7502861°W / 42.6489417; -73.7502861 (Old Post Office)
Downtown Completed in 1883 after four years of construction, this eclectic building formed a dynamic visual grouping downtown along with the D&H and First Trust buildings. It continued to be used as federal offices after the post office moved to a larger building.[17]
40 Palace Theatre PalaceTheater.JPG 01979-10-04 October 4, 1979 19 Clinton Ave.
42°39′17.08″N 73°45′0.76″W / 42.6547444°N 73.7502111°W / 42.6547444; -73.7502111 (Palace Theatre)
Arbor Hill and Downtown When opened in 1930 it was the third largest theater in the world. John Eberson designed the Austrian Baroque interior considered an excellent example of his atmospheric theatres.[51] Now owned by the city, it was extensively renovated in 2002.[52]
41 Pastures Historic District Houses on Westerlo Street, Albany, NY.jpg 01972-03-16 March 16, 1972 Bounded on north by Madison Avenue, on east by Green Street, on south by South Ferry Street, on west by South Pearl Street
42°38′38.9″N 73°45′15.67″W / 42.644139°N 73.7543528°W / 42.644139; -73.7543528 (Pastures Historic District)
Pastures At the city's founding, this area south of the stockade was set aside as common pastureland. In the 19th century it was the site of city's first major residential expansion.[53] It is recovering from a controversial urban renewal plan in the late 20th century.[54]
42 Quackenbush House Quackenbush House 2011 1.jpg 01972-06-19 June 19, 1972 683 Broadway
42°39′14.5″N 73°44′54.53″W / 42.654028°N 73.7484806°W / 42.654028; -73.7484806 (Quackenbush House)
Downtown Most likely built in the 1740s—though possibly as early as 1736—the Quackenbush House is the oldest remaining example of Dutch Colonial architecture, which was once characteristic of early Albany. It is currently the only original house left on the block; the rest were demolished during the construction of the Clinton Avenue exit of Interstate 787.[55] Most recently the building served as an English pub.[56]
43 Quackenbush Pumping Station, Albany Water Works Albany Pump Station Panorama.jpg 01983-06-30 June 30, 1983 Quackenbush Square
42°39′15.12″N 73°44′51.4″W / 42.6542°N 73.747611°W / 42.6542; -73.747611 (Quackenbush Pumping Station, Albany Water Works)
Downtown In 1873, Albany's rapid growth required the construction of the original buildings of this complex to pump water from the Hudson. It reached its present configuration in 1895, and continued pumping until 1937, with the city's water department continuing to use it as office space.[57] Now the Albany Pump House, a restaurant and brewpub,[58] that also houses the city's visitors center.[59]
44 Rapp Road Community Historic District 02002-12-27 December 27, 2002 Rapp Road
42°41′46″N 73°51′12″W / 42.69611°N 73.85333°W / 42.69611; -73.85333 (Rapp Road Community Historic District)
Rapp Road and Pine Bush Originally acquired and subdivided by a local minister, this neighborhood on the city's edge is a rare example of a chain-migration African-American community started by migrants from Mississippi during the Great Migration that continues to thrive today.[38]
45 St. Andrew's Episcopal Church St. Andrew's Episcopal Church 1.jpg 02005-01-07 January 7, 2005 10 N. Main Ave.
42°39′52.66″N 73°47′17.76″W / 42.6646278°N 73.7882667°W / 42.6646278; -73.7882667 (St. Andrew's Episcopal Church)
Pine Hills Architect Norman Sturgis designed this 1930 Anglo-Catholic church to reflect the values of his mentor, Ralph Adams Cram; it remains mostly intact from construction. The congregation, established in 1897, helped pioneer the development of the Pine Hills neighborhood as the city grew.[60]
46 St. Mary's Church StMarysChurchAlbany.jpg 01977-07-14 July 14, 1977 10 Lodge St.
42°39′6.58″N 73°45′9.89″W / 42.6518278°N 73.7527472°W / 42.6518278; -73.7527472 (St. Mary's Church)
Downtown The Angel of Judgement statue atop the 175-foot (53 m) steeple of this Italianate Romanesque church has been a city landmark ever since its construction in 1867. It is the third church for the oldest Roman Catholic parish in the city and the second oldest in the state.[61]
47 St. Peter's Church St Peters Church 2011.jpg 01972-03-16 March 16, 1972 107 State St.
42°39′3.19″N 73°45′14.36″W / 42.6508861°N 73.7539889°W / 42.6508861; -73.7539889 (St. Peter's Church)
Downtown Richard Upjohn and his son collaborated on this 1860 French Gothic Episcopal Church, considered one of the former's best. George Lord Howe, killed at the Battle of Carillon in 1758, is interred beneath the vestibule.[62] He is the only British peer buried in the United States.
48 Philip Schuyler Mansion Schuyler Mansion Panorama Left.jpg 01967-12-24 December 24, 1967 Clinton and Schuyler streets
42°38′29.01″N 73°45′33.06″W / 42.6413917°N 73.7591833°W / 42.6413917; -73.7591833 (Schuyler, Philip, Mansion)
Mansion District Philip Schuyler chose many of the interior furnishings for his house personally while in England, the first full-size Georgian house in the upper Hudson Valley when it was completed in 1764. He lived there for the last forty years of his life, during which he served as a general in the Continental Army, hosting John Burgoyne at the house while he was a prisoner of war, and later as a U.S. Senator.[63] In the 19th century it became an orphanage[64]; today it is a state historic site.
49 South End – Groesbeckville Historic District South End-Groesbeckville Historic District.jpg 01984-09-13 September 13, 1984 Roughly bounded by Elizabeth, 2nd, and Morton avenues, Pearl and Franklin streets
42°38′22.99″N 73°45′35.14″W / 42.6397194°N 73.7597611°W / 42.6397194; -73.7597611 (South End-Groesbeckville Historic District)
South End As Albany industrialized in the mid- and late 19th century, this 26-block neighborhood around the Schuyler Mansion developed rapidly into housing for the workers, mostly immigrants. The area is still associated with the city's German American population.[17]
50 Ten Broeck Mansion TenBroeckMansion.jpg 01971-08-12 August 12, 1971 9 Ten Broeck Pl.
42°39′31.37″N 73°45′4.07″W / 42.6587139°N 73.7511306°W / 42.6587139; -73.7511306 (Ten Broeck Mansion)
Arbor Hill This was the home of Abraham Ten Broeck, a member of the colonial Assembly and Continental Congress who served as a local militia officer during the Revolutionary War. It was built in 1797 while he was mayor. Later it was used as a school; since 1948 it has been a historic house museum.[65]
51 United Traction Company Building United Traction Company Albany.jpg 01976-05-24 May 24, 1976 598 Broadway
42°39′7.71″N 73°44′58.55″W / 42.6521417°N 73.7495972°W / 42.6521417; -73.7495972 (United Traction Company Building)
North Albany/Downtown Marcus Reynolds' 1899 Italian Renaissance Revival building was the headquarters of Albany's trolley company through the 1950s, when it was merged into the Capital District Transportation Authority. It was an architectural counterpart to Union Station across the street that served, along with it, as the gateway to the city for many visitors.[66]
52 University Club of Albany University Club of Albany.jpg 02011-05-11 May 11, 2011 141 Washington Ave.
42°39′21.14″N 73°45′39.77″W / 42.6558722°N 73.7610472°W / 42.6558722; -73.7610472 (University Club of Albany, The)
Adapted from the remnants of a burnt Queen Anne mansion, this 1924 structure is local architect Albert Fuller's last significant work.[67]
53 USS Slater (Destroyer Escort) USS Slater Panorama.jpg 01998-05-07 May 7, 1998 Port of Albany
42°38′33.08″N 73°44′58.99″W / 42.6425222°N 73.7497194°W / 42.6425222; -73.7497194 (USS Slater (Destroyer Escort))
Downtown The Slater, a Cannon-class destroyer escort, is the only one still afloat in the U.S. After serving in the Atlantic during the last years of World War II, she was later sold to the Greek Navy and rechristened the Aetos. Her 40 years of service there included use as a set in The Guns of Navarone and other films. After being decommissioned in 1994, she was eventually relocated to Albany for her current use as a museum ship.[68]
54 Van Ostrande – Radliff House 48 Hudson Ave Albany.jpg 02008-01-10 January 10, 2008 48 Hudson Ave.
42°38′51.01″N 73°45′6.85″W / 42.6475028°N 73.7519028°W / 42.6475028; -73.7519028 (Van Ostrande--Radliff House)
Downtown Records discovered in the early 21st century confirmed, along with dendrochronological analysis, that the oldest portion of this small downtown structure was erected in 1728, making it the oldest extant building in Albany, even after modifications in the early 19th century and later additions. Many of its original Dutch Colonial structural elements survive, including the only anchor beam framing for a jambless fireplace known to exist in the U.S. The site also has archeological potential.[69]
55 Washington Avenue (Tenth Battalion) Armory Washington Ave Armory.jpg 01995-03-02 March 2, 1995 195 Washington Ave.
42°39′25.59″N 73°45′44.56″W / 42.6571083°N 73.7623778°W / 42.6571083; -73.7623778 (Washington Avenue (Tenth Battalion) Armory)
Washington Avenue Isaac Perry's 1890 building for the city's National Guard unit was his first to use many of the fortress-like elements and materials that distinguish his later armories around the state.[25] Today it is used as a sports and concert venue.
56 Washington Park Historic District Washington Park Playhouse.jpg 01972-06-19 June 19, 1972 Washington Park and surrounding properties
42°39′23.05″N 73°46′12.06″W / 42.6564028°N 73.7700167°W / 42.6564028; -73.7700167 (Washington Park Historic District)
Washington Park Albany's largest historic district consists of its largest park and the streets around it. The former, praised as one of America's most important,[70] was built in 1869 on land reserved for public purposes since the city's founding; the latter include fashionable residences built by Stanford White and H.H. Richardson.[71]
57 Whipple Cast and Wrought Iron Bowstring Truss Bridge Whipple Cast - Wrought Iron Bowstring Truss Bridge.jpg 01971-03-18 March 18, 1971 1000 Delaware Ave.
42°38′8.86″N 73°48′1.62″W / 42.6357944°N 73.80045°W / 42.6357944; -73.80045 (Whipple Cast and Wrought Iron Bowstring Truss Bridge)
Normansville This Whipple-style bridge is one of the oldest remaining iron bridges in the United States. Whipple bridges were noted for their ease of fabrication, light weight, and low cost. Originally part of the Delaware Turnpike, the bridge has been owned by a private farm since 1899.[72]
58 Young Men's Christian Association Building Y.M.C.A. - Albany, NY.jpg 01978-11-02 November 2, 1978 60–64 N. Pearl St.
42°39′6.64″N 73°45′5.51″W / 42.6518444°N 73.7515306°W / 42.6518444; -73.7515306 (Young Men's Christian Association Building)
Downtown Considered a fine urban example of the Romanesque Revival style, this 1886 building had the first gymnasium in upstate New York and one of the first indoor swimming pools in the country. Six years later, it hosted the first basketball game played away from Springfield College, the sport's birthplace.[73]

See also

References

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