New European Painting


New European Painting

New European Painting emerged in the 1980s and has clearly reached a critical point of major distinction and influence in the 1990s[1] with painters like Gerhard Richter[2][3] and Bracha Ettinger[4][5][6] whose paintings have established and continue to create a new dialogue between the historical archive, American Abstraction and figurality,[7] followed by painters like Luc Tuymans, Marlene Dumas and others,[8][9][Need quotation to verify]. A third wave came with artists like Neo Rauch, Michaël Borremans and Chris Ofili.[citation needed] Neo-expressionism and other related movements in painting have emerged in the final two decades of the 20th century in Europe and in the United States, but this New Painting is not expressionist. Rather it is a renovative kind of abstraction and figuration that relates to the parallel practice of a turning into art of personal and historical photographic archives.[10] The New European Painting relates to the post traumatic traces of war[11] and it involves working oil painting and drawings with new media like photography,[12] xerox[13][14] and digital media[15][16] to create and develop a postmodern archive "fever".[17][18] This painting relates through this aspect to the post WW2 "archive" art with artists like Christian Boltanski and Jochen Gerz,[19] and it is often a part of this tendency. Yet, though this painting has a clear figurative stroke it is strongly connected to Lyrical Abstraction[20] and to contemporary reconsiderations of the Sublime in art.

Contents

Bibliography

  • Hans-Ulrich Obrist, Laurence Bosse and Carolyne Christove-Bakargiev, La Ville, le Jardin, la Memoire / City, Garden, Memory. Villa Medici, Rome, 1999.
  • Michael Ann Holley and Keith Moxey, Art History, Aesthetics, Visual Studies. Clarck Art Institute, Studley Press 2002.
  • Chris Dercon, Face a l'Histoire / In Front of History. Pompidou Centre, Paris, 1996.
  • Griselda Pollock, Encounters in the Virtual Feminist Museum: Time, Space and the Archive. Routledge, 2007.
  • Patrick Le Nouene and Jochen Gerz, Gerz: L'ouevre sur papier photographique 1983-86. Musee des Beaux-Arts de Calais, 1986.

References

  1. ^ Chris Dercon (ed.), 1980-1996 in: Face a l'Histoire, Centre george Pompidou / Flammarion, 1996, pp.496-561.
  2. ^ Gerhard Richter. Atlas. D.A.P., NY, 2006.
  3. ^ Stefan Germer, "Des souvenirs inoppotuns," in: Jean-Paul Ameline, Brigitte Leal, Marc Bormand and Chris Dercon (eds.), Face a l'Histoire, Centre george Pompidou / Flammarion, 1996, pp. 544-547.
  4. ^ Brian Massumi and Catherine de Zegher (eds.), Drawing Papers n.24. The Drawing Center, NY, 2001
  5. ^ Carol Armstrong and Catherine de Zegher (eds.), Women Artists at the Millennium. Cambridge Massachusetts: October Books, MIT Press, 2006
  6. ^ Griselda Pollock, "Rencontre avec l'histoire," in: Jean-Paul Ameline, Brigitte Leal, Marc Bormand and Chris Dercon (eds.), Face a l'Histoire, Centre george Pompidou / Flammarion, 1996, pp. 535-540.
  7. ^ Pollock, Griselda, "Aesthetic Wit(h)nessing in the Era of Trauma." In: EurAmerica. Vol.40 n.4: 829-886. 2010.[1]
  8. ^ Sofie Van Loo, Gorge(l). The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 2008
  9. ^ Lisa gabrielle Mark (ed.) and Marlene Dumas: Measuring Your Own Grave. The Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerpen, 2006
  10. ^ Hans-Ulrich Obrist, Laurence Bosse and Carolyne Christove-Bakargiev, La Ville, le Jardin, la Memoire / City, Garden, Memory. Villa Medici, Rome, 1999.
  11. ^ Griselda Pollock and Penny Florence, Looking Back to the Future. G&B Arts Press, 2000.
  12. ^ Hal Foster, The Return of the Real. MIT Press / October Book, 1996.
  13. ^ Jean-Francois Lyotard, "Scriptures: Diffracted Traces",Theory, Culture and Society. (Vol.21 n.1), 2004.
  14. ^ Griselda Pollock, "Gleaning in history or coming after/behind the reapers. Generations and Geographies in the Visual Arts. London: Routledge, 1996.
  15. ^ ARS06 - Sense of the Real, KIASMA Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki, 2006.
  16. ^ Amy Scholder and Jordan Crandall, Interaction. NY: D.A.P., 2001.
  17. ^ Griselda Pollock, Encounters in the Virtual Feminist Museum: Time, Space and the Archive. Routledge, 2007.
  18. ^ Okwui Enwezor, Archive Fever: Photography Between History and the Monument [2].
  19. ^ Rosi Huhn, Das Problem der Entsorgung in Kunst und Kulture als Passage zum Positiven Barbarentum / Le Problème du traitement des résidus dans l'art et dans la culture, en tant que passage vers une 'Barbarie Positive, Passages [d']après]/ Passagen Nach Walter Benjamin.Verlag Herman Schmidt, Mainz, 1992.
  20. ^ Alison Rowley, Helen Frankenthaler: Painting History, Writing painting, I.B.Tauris Publishers, 2007

See also

External links


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