Auburn hair


Auburn hair

Auburn is a light brown or reddish brown hair color (and subsequently color), [http://www.bartleby.com/61/47/A0514700.html "Auburn" in the American Heritage Dictionary] ] and may be described as somewhere between brown, blond, and red hair. Auburn comes Old French "alborne", which meant blond, from Latin "alburnus", "off-white". [http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=auburn "Auburn" in the Online Etymology Dictionary] ] The first recorded use of "auburn" in English was in 1430. [Maerz and Paul "A Dictionary of Color" New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 190; Color Sample of Auburn Page 37 Plate 7 Color Sample C11] In hair color, auburn is frequently misused as a synonym for red.

The chemicals which cause auburn hair are phaeomelanin and high levels of brown eumelanin. It is common in Europe but rare elsewhere.Fact|date=September 2008

In cosmetology, a brighter shade called vivid auburn is used for dyeing hair.Fact|date=September 2008

Auburn in human culture

Auburn hair occurs almost solely in European culture. The Roman writer Tacitus wrote that the hair of the Germanic peoples was "rutilus", which is Latin for "auburn" or "golden blond".

Though the word was in use in the English language by 1430, the bastardization "abram" was frequently used. ["The Wordsworth Dictionary of Phrase and Fable"]

Today in the United States of America, the color chosen to represent such fields of learning as forestry, environmental studies, and natural resource management is "russet", but in practice schools and suppliers of regalia use an auburn.Fact|date=September 2008

ee also

*Brown hair
*Red hair
*Blond hair

References

External links

* [http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=auburn&searchmode=none Online Etymology Dictionary]


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  • auburn — [ obɶrn ] adj. inv. • 1835; mot angl. ♦ Vieilli Se dit d une couleur de cheveux châtain roux aux reflets cuivrés. ⇒ acajou. Des cheveux auburn. ● auburn adjectif invariable (anglais auburn, de l ancien français auborne, du bas latin alburnus, de… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Auburn — is an often reddish brown color, used specifically of hair.*Auburn hairIt may also refer to: Places In Australia: *Auburn, Victoria, a suburb of Melbourne *Auburn, New South Wales ** Electoral district of Auburn, an electoral district in the New… …   Wikipedia

  • hair — W1S1 [heə US her] n [: Old English; Origin: hAr] 1.) [U] the mass of things like fine threads that grows on your head ▪ She put on her lipstick and brushed her hair . ▪ I must get my hair cut it s getting very long. ▪ You ve had your hair done… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • hair — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ auburn, black, blond, brown, chestnut, dark, fair, ginger (BrE), golden, grey/gray, grizzled …   Collocations dictionary

  • auburn — /aw beuhrn/, n. 1. a reddish brown or golden brown color. adj. 2. having auburn color: auburn hair. [1400 50; late ME abo(u)rne blond < MF, OF auborne, alborne < L alburnus whitish. See ALBURNUM] * * * ▪ Alabama, United States       city, Lee… …   Universalium

  • auburn — [[t]ɔ͟ːbə(r)n[/t]] COLOUR Auburn hair is reddish brown. ...a tall woman with long auburn hair …   English dictionary

  • auburn — au|burn [ˈo:bən US ˈo:bərn] adj [Date: 1400 1500; : Old French; Origin: auborne blond , from Medieval Latin alburnus whitish , from Latin albus white ; probably influenced by brun, an early form of brown] auburn hair is a reddish brown colour… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • auburn — /ˈɔbən / (say awbuhn) noun 1. a reddish brown or golden brown colour. –adjective 2. having auburn colour: auburn hair. {Middle English auburne, from Old French auborne, from Latin alburnus whitish, from albus white} …   Australian English dictionary

  • auburn — au|burn [ ɔbərn ] adjective auburn hair is brownish red in color …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • auburn — adjective auburn hair is a reddish brown colour …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English


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