Check-Out


Check-Out

Check-Out is a pricing game on the American television game show "The Price Is Right". Debuting on January 28, 1982, it is played for a four-digit prize, usually valued between $2,000 and $10,000, and uses grocery items.

Gameplay

One by one, the contestant is asked to give a price for five grocery items. After all five prices are guessed, the contestant's guesses are totaled.

The actual prices for the five grocery items are then announced, one at a time. If the contestant's total is within $2 of the actual total above or below, the contestant wins the prize.

This is one of very few pricing games in which the contestant can go over the actual total and still win.

History

Check-Out was created by Kathy Greco and Barbara Hunter, both production assistants.

The original winning range was 50 cents. This changed to $1 in April 3, 1996, before being raised to its current spread in October 2003.

For many years, the game's set included a "calculator" that the models used to enter the contestant's guesses. The calculator was removed in 2001, largely because the buttons no longer actually had a functional purpose, a fact which had inadvertently been made obvious on-the-air during one of its last appearances.

The game's actual price display, where it was originally a vane display, is now an eggcrate display. The display for the contestant's guesses and total remains a vane display. The game was removed from rotation from September 29, 1995 through April 3, 1996 in order to fix the display.

On three occasions, including the recent occurrence on July 4, 2008, the contestant has arrived at an exactly correct total, though never with perfect bids on each item.


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • check out — {v.} 1a. To pay your hotel bill and leave. * /The last guests checked out of their rooms in the morning./ Contrast: CHECK IN. 1b. {informal} To go away; leave. * /I hoped our guest would stay but he had to check out before Monday./ Compare: CHECK …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • check out — {v.} 1a. To pay your hotel bill and leave. * /The last guests checked out of their rooms in the morning./ Contrast: CHECK IN. 1b. {informal} To go away; leave. * /I hoped our guest would stay but he had to check out before Monday./ Compare: CHECK …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Check-out — 〈[ tʃɛkaʊt] od. [tʃɛ̣kaʊt] n. 15〉 1. Abfertigung der Fluggäste nach dem Flug 2. (nach der Herstellung erfolgende abschließende) Kontrolle u. Funktionsprüfung von techn. Geräten [<engl. check „Prüfung, Kontrolle“ + out „aus, heraus“] * * *… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • check out — v. t. 1. To inspect or examine. [Colloq.] [PJC] 2. To make a record of having borrowed (something) for temporary use; as, to check out a book at the library; to check out equipment from a depository. [PJC] 3. To bring (items to be purchased) to a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • check out — (someone/something) to discover the facts about someone or something. Not one of the places I checked out seemed right for the wedding. We checked out his story, and his boss says he really was at work that day. Usage notes: often used in the… …   New idioms dictionary

  • Check-out — bzw. Checkout steht für: die virtuelle Kasse im E Commerce, siehe Check out (E Commerce) ein Bezahlsystem von Google, siehe Google Checkout die Aktualisierung einer lokalen Kopie in der Versionsverwaltung, siehe Versionsverwaltung#Funktionsweise… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Check-out — Check: Die Bezeichnung für eine »Überprüfung, Kontrolle« stammt aus gleichbed. engl. check, das selbst eine Entlehnung aus afrz. echec »Schach« ist. Bereits im 19. Jh. finden sich im Dt. Belege des Wortes, zunächst allerdings auf die englischen… …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

  • check out — v. i. 1. To vacate a room at a hotel, notel, etc. Converse of {check in}. [PJC] 2. To die. [Colloq.] [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • check out — (something) to pay for something you are buying or to let someone record what you are borrowing. To complete your online purchase, check out by clicking on the icon below. Ty checked another three books out of the library this afternoon …   New idioms dictionary

  • check out of … — ˌcheck ˈout (of…) derived to pay your bill and leave a hotel, etc • Guests should check out of their rooms by noon. • I m sorry, they aren t here. They checked out this morning. related noun ↑checkout (2) …   Useful english dictionary


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