Appeal to flattery


Appeal to flattery

Appeal to flattery is a fallacy in which a person uses flattery, excessive compliments, in an attempt to win support for their side.

Flattery is often used to hide the true intent of an idea or proposal. Praise offers a momentary personal distraction that can often weaken judgement. Moreover, it is usually a cunning form of appeal to consequences, since the audience is subject to be flattered "as long as they comply" with the flatterer.

Examples:

:"Surely a man as smart as you can see this is a brilliant proposal." (failing to accept the proposal is a tacit admission of stupidity)

:"I needed a beautiful woman to endorse my product, so naturally I thought of you." (failing to endorse the product a tacit rejection of being beautiful)

Appeal to flattery is a specific kind of appeal to emotion.


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