Wax paper


Wax paper

Wax paper (also called waxed paper) is a kind of paper that is made moisture proof through the application of wax.

The practice of oiling parchment or paper in order to make it semi-translucent or moisture-proof goes back at least to medieval times. Thomas Edison claimed to have invented wax paper in 1872Fact|date=November 2007 , but what he really invented was a cheap and efficient means to manufacture such paper. [ cite web | url = http://m4th.com/Articles/Article.php?Article-Title=9-Inventions-Edison-Did-Not-Make | first = Juhad | last = Shuaib | title = Nine Inventions that Edison Did Not Invent ]

Wax paper is commonly used in cooking, for its non-stick properties, and wrapping food for storage, such as cookies, as it keeps water out or in. It is also used in arts and crafts.

Food Preparation

"Oven": Wax paper should not be used for most baking as it will smoke, however it can be used in some baking as long as the batter completely covers the wax paper. [ [http://www.reynoldspkg.com/reynoldskitchens/en/faq_detail.asp?info_page_id=750&prod_id=1792&cat_id=1337 Reynolds Kitchens: Products: FAQ ] ]

"Microwave": Wax paper can function as a splatter cover in microwave cooking. Because the paper is mostly unaffected by microwaves, it will not heat to the point of combustion under normal usage. This makes wax paper more functional than plastic wrap which will melt at lower temperatures, or aluminium foil (or tin foil) which is not safe for use in most microwave ovens.

Other Uses

Wax paper is used to create sky lanterns.

Wax paper is also used in the manufacture of some less expensive models of the kazooFact|date=August 2007.

Another use of wax paper is to apply wax to objects. By rubbing the wax paper on an object the wax will rub off the paper and onto the objectFact|date=August 2007. This is useful for adding a slight polish or to reduce friction.

Wax paper can also be used to block smells.Or|date=September 2007

References

ee also

* Glassine
* Baking paper
* Greaseproof paper
* Tetra Pak
* Parchment#Plant-based parchment


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Wax paper — Wax Wax, n. [AS. weax; akin to OFries. wax, D. was, G. wachs, OHG. wahs, Icel. & Sw. vax, Dan. vox, Lith. vaszkas, Russ. vosk .] [1913 Webster] 1. A fatty, solid substance, produced by bees, and employed by them in the construction of their comb; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wax paper — n. a kind of paper made moisture proof by a wax, or paraffin, coating: also waxed paper …   English World dictionary

  • wax paper — wax ,paper noun uncount AMERICAN a special type of paper covered in a thin layer of wax that does not allow oil or GREASE to pass through it, used in cooking and for wrapping food …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • wax paper — noun paper that has been waterproofed by treatment with wax or paraffin • Hypernyms: ↑paper * * * variant of waxed paper * * * a whitish, translucent wrapping paper made moistureproof by a paraffin coating. Also, waxed paper. [1835 45] * * * wax… …   Useful english dictionary

  • wax paper — N UNCOUNT Wax paper is paper that has been covered with a thin layer of wax. It is used mainly in cooking or to wrap food. [AM] Syn: waxed paper (in BRIT, use greaseproof paper) …   English dictionary

  • wax paper — wax′ pa per n. a whitish, translucent wrapping paper made moistureproof by a paraffin coating • Etymology: 1835–45 …   From formal English to slang

  • wax paper — /ˈwæks peɪpə/ (say waks paypuh) noun paper made moistureproof by coating with paraffin wax, used especially in cooking and the wrapping of foodstuffs …   Australian English dictionary

  • wax paper — a whitish, translucent wrapping paper made moistureproof by a paraffin coating. Also, waxed paper. [1835 45] * * * …   Universalium

  • wax paper — noun Date: circa 1844 waxed paper …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • wax paper — noun A semi translucent, moisture proof paper made with a waxy coating, used primarily for cooking and packaging …   Wiktionary


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