Duke of Rutland


Duke of Rutland

Earl of Rutland and Duke of Rutland are titles in the peerage of England, derived from Rutland, a county in the East Midlands of England. The Earl of Rutland was elevated to the status of Duke in 1703 and the titles were merged.

the Arms of the Duke of Rutland.

Contents

First creation of the Earldom of Rutland

The title Earl of Rutland was created for Edward Plantagenet, (1373–1415), son of Edmund of Langley, Duke of York, and grandson of King Edward III. Upon the Duke's death in 1402 Edward became Duke of York. The title Earl of Rutland fell in to disuse upon his death at the Battle of Agincourt, and was assumed by other members of the House of York including first earl's nephew Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, the father of King Edward IV, and his second son Edmund.

Second creation

Thomas Manners (c. 1488–1543), son of the 12th Baron de Ros of Hamlake, Truibut and Belvoir, was created earl of Rutland in the peerage of England in 1525. His mother, Anne St Leger, was Richard Plantagenet's granddaughter.

The barony of 'de Ros of Hamlake, Truibut and Belvoir' (sometimes spelled Ros, Roos or de Roos) was created by Simon de Montfort with a writ of summons to the House of Lords for Robert de Ros (1223–1285) in 1264. The title may pass through the female line when there is no male heir, and accordingly, when the 3rd earl, Edward Manners (c. 1548–1587), left no sons, the barony of Ros passed to the family of his daughter Elizabeth (d. 1591) who became the wife of William Cecil, Earl of Exeter.

Edward Manners' successor as the 4th earl was his brother John (d. 1588). The barony of Ros was restored to the Manners family when Francis Manners, the 6th earl (1578–1632), inherited it in 1618 from his cousin William Cecil (1590–1618). However, Francis died without male issue and the assumption of the courtesy title of Lord Ros for the eldest son of subsequent earls appears to have had no legal basis.

On the death of the seventh Earl in 1641 the Earldom passed to his distant cousin John Manners of Haddon Hall, grandson of the second son of the first Earl.

The 9th earl John Manners, (1638–1711), was created Duke of Rutland and Marquess of Granby in 1703 by Queen Anne.

Subsidiary titles

The subsidiary titles of the Duke are: Marquess of Granby (created 1703), Earl of Rutland (1525), Baron Manners, of Haddon in the County of Derby (1679), and Baron Roos of Belvoir, of Belvoir in the County of Leicester (1896). The title Baron Roos of Belvoir is in the United Kingdom peerage; the remaining titles being in the peerage of England. The most senior subsidiary title, Marquess of Granby, is the courtesy title of the Duke's eldest son and heir.

The most notable Marquess of Granby was John Manners (1721–1770), son of the third Duke. An accomplished soldier and popular figure of his time, his title was honoured by being used by a very large number of public houses throughout Britain. The towns of Granby, Quebec and Granby, Massachusetts, United States were also named after him.

The family still own Haddon Hall and Belvoir Castle, both of which are open to the public.

500th Anniversary

In 2009, as part of the celebrations to mark the 500th anniversary of the occupancy of Belvoir Castle by the Manners family, two aircraft from RAF Cranwell, Lincolnshire, bore the Duke of Rutland's Coat of Arms. On 11 June 2009 the Duke visited the station to see the aircraft — a King Air from 45 (Reserve) Sqn and a Dominie from 55 (Reserve) Sdn.[1]

Earls of Rutland, first Creation (1385)

Other titles (1st Duke): Duke of York (1385), Duke of Aumale (1397–1399), Earl of Cambridge (1362–1414), Earl of Rutland (1390–1402), Earl of Cork (c. 1396)

Edward of Norwich's brother, Richard of Conisburgh, had been attainted and executed for treason in August 1415. This attainture stood in the way of his son Richard Plantagenet succeeding Edward until the king deemed it prudent to restore them.

Other titles (2nd Duke): Duke of York (1385, restored 1425–1460), Earl of Ulster (1264), Earl of March (1328), Earl of Cambridge (1414, restored 1426), feudal Lord of Clare (bt. 1066–1075), Baron Mortimer of Wigmore (1331)

The Earldom fell out of use after the 2nd Earl. Its heir ascended the throne as Edward IV, so it would have merged with the throne anyway.

Earls of Rutland, second Creation (1525)

Other titles (1st–3rd & 6th Earls): Baron de Ros of Helmsley (1299)

Dukes of Rutland (1703)

Other titles: Marquess of Granby (1703), Earl of Rutland (1525) and Baron Manners of Haddon (1679)
  • John Manners, Lord Roos (1751–1760), eldest son of Lord Granby, died young
  • George Manners, Marquess of Granby (1807), eldest son of the 5th Duke, died in infancy
  • George Manners, Marquess of Granby (1813–1814), second son of the 5th Duke, died in infancy
  • Robert Manners, Lord Manners (1885–1894), elder son of the 8th Duke, died young

The heir apparent is Charles Manners, Marquess of Granby (b. 1999), elder son of the 11th Duke

See also

References

External links


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Charles Manners, 4th Duke of Rutland — For other people named Charles Manners, see Charles Manners (disambiguation). The 4th Duke of Rutland Charles Manners, 4th Duke of Rutland KG, PC (15 March 1754 – 24 October 1787) was a British politician and nobleman, the eldest legitimate son… …   Wikipedia

  • David Manners, 11th Duke of Rutland — David Charles Robert Manners, 11th Duke of Rutland (born 8 May 1959) is a British peer and landowner. He was born the elder son of the 10th Duke of Rutland by his second wife, the former Frances Sweeney. He succeeded his father in the titles on 2 …   Wikipedia

  • Charles Manners, 6th Duke of Rutland — For other people named Charles Manners, see Charles Manners (disambiguation). Caricature by Coïdé published in Vanity Fair in 1871. Charles Manners, 6th Duke of Rutland KG (16 May 1815 – 3 March 1888, Belvoir Castle), styled Marquess of Granby… …   Wikipedia

  • John Manners, 1st Duke of Rutland — and 9th Earl of Rutland (Boughton, May 29 1638 – January 10 1711, Belvoir Castle) was the son of John Manners, 8th Earl of Rutland and Frances Montagu. His maternal grandparents were Sir Edward Montagu, 1st Baron Montagu of Boughton and his wife… …   Wikipedia

  • Charles Manners, 10th Duke of Rutland — For other people named Charles Manners, see Charles Manners (disambiguation). Charles John Robert Manners, 10th Duke of Rutland (28 May 1919 – 2 January 1999) was the son of John Manners, 9th Duke of Rutland. He married, firstly, Anne Bairstow… …   Wikipedia

  • John Manners, 5th Duke of Rutland — John Henry Manners, 5th Duke of Rutland, KG (Knightsbridge, January 4 1778 – 20 January 1857, Belvoir Castle) was the son of Charles Manners, 4th Duke of Rutland. He was styled Lord Roos from 1778 until 1779 and Marquess of Granby from 1779 until …   Wikipedia

  • John Manners, 7th Duke of Rutland — John James Robert Manners, 7th Duke of Rutland, KG, GCB, PC (13 December 1818 ndash; 4 August 1906), known as Lord John Manners before 1888, was an English statesman.He was born at Belvoir Castle on the 13th of December 1818, being the younger… …   Wikipedia

  • John Manners, 9th Duke of Rutland — John Henry Montagu Manners, 9th Duke of Rutland (September 21 1886 ndash;April 22 1940) was the son of Henry Manners, 8th Duke of Rutland and his wife Violet.He married Kathleen Tennant, from his mother s circle The Souls , on 27 January 1916.… …   Wikipedia

  • John Manners, 2nd Duke of Rutland — KG (September 18 1676 ndash; February 22 1721) was the son of John Manners, 1st Duke of Rutland and his third wife Catherine Wriothesley Noel, daughter of Baptist Noel, 3rd Viscount Campden. He was styled Lord Roos from 1679 until 1703 and… …   Wikipedia

  • Henry Manners, 8th Duke of Rutland — Henry John Brinsley Manners, 8th Duke of Rutland KG (April 16 1852 ndash; May 8 1925) was the son of John Manners, 7th Duke of Rutland. He was styled Marquess of Granby from 1888 to 1906.He married Marion Margaret Violet Lindsay, daughter of… …   Wikipedia


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