Boolean domain


Boolean domain

In mathematics and abstract algebra, a Boolean domain is a set consisting of exactly two elements whose interpretations include "false" and "true". In mathematics and theoretical computer science, a Boolean domain is usually written as {0,1} or {ot, op}.

The algebraic structure that naturally builds on a Boolean domain is the Boolean algebra with two elements. The initial object in the category of bounded lattices is a Boolean domain. The Sierpiński space, a certain topological space with two elements, resembles a Boolean domain.

In computer science, a Boolean variable is a variable that takes values in some Boolean domain. Some programming languages feature reserved words or symbols for the elements of the Boolean domain, for example false and true. However, many programming languages do not have a Boolean datatype in the strict sense. In C or BASIC, for example, falsity is represented by the number 0 and truth is represented by the number 1 or -1, respectively, and all variables that can take these values can also take any other numerical values.

ee also

* Boolean-valued function


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