United States Deputy Secretary of the Interior


United States Deputy Secretary of the Interior

The Deputy Secretary of the Interior, in the United States government, advises and assists the Secretary of the Interior in the supervision and direction of the Department of the Interior and its activities, and succeeds the Secretary in his or her absence, sickness, or unavailability. [cite web | title="US CODE: Title 5,3345. Acting officer" | url=http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode05/usc_sec_05_00003345----000-.html | accessdate= September 20 | accessyear= 2007 ] The Deputy Secretary of the Interior is appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. [cite web | title="US CODE: Title 43,1452. Deputy Secretary of the Interior; appointment" | url=http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode43/usc_sec_43_00001452----000-.html | accessdate= September 20 | accessyear= 2007 ] In 1990, the title of the position was changed from Under Secretary of the Interior to Deputy Secretary of the Interior. [cite web | title="US CODE: Title 43,1452. Deputy Secretary of the Interior; appointment" | url=http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode43/usc_sec_43_00001452----000-notes.html | accessdate= September 20 | accessyear= 2007 ]

The current Deputy Secretary is Lynn Scarlett, who was sworn in November 22, 2005. With the resignation Secretary Gale Norton announced March 10, 2006, effective at the end of March, Scarlett became the Acting Secretary of the Interior until President George W. Bush's nomination for Secretary, Dirk Kempthorne, was confirmed by the United States Senate on May 26 of that year. [cite web | title="U.S. Department of the Interior - Lynn Scarlett Biography" | url=http://www.doi.gov/bio/bioscarlett.htm | accessdate= September 20 | accessyear= 2007 ] The last Deputy Secretary, sworn in on July 12, 2001, was J. Steven Griles. [cite web | title="U.S. Department of the Interior - James Steven Griles Biography" | url=http://web.archive.org/web/20060524215053/http://www.doi.gov/secretary/griles.html | accessdate= May 24 | accessyear= 2006 ]

Section 3346 of U.S. Code within Title 5, or 5 U.S.C. § 3346, details time limitations of acting officers. An acting officer may serve no longer than 210 days after the vacancy, from the date a first or second nomination is pending before the Senate, the date a first or second nomination is withdrawn, rejected, or returned, or the date the Senate reconvenes if the appointment has taken place while Congress has adjourned sine die. [cite web | title="US CODE: Title 5,3346. Time limitation" | url=http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode05/usc_sec_05_00003346----000-.html | accessdate= September 20 | accessyear= 2007 ]

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