Biogeochemical cycle


Biogeochemical cycle
A commonly cited example is the water cycle.

In ecology and Earth science, a biogeochemical cycle or substance turnover or cycling of substances is a pathway by which a chemical element or molecule moves through both biotic (biosphere) and abiotic (lithosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere) compartments of Earth. A cycle is a series of change which comes back to the starting point and which can be repeated. The term “biogeochemical” tells us that biological; geological and chemical factors are all involved. On the other hand the circulation of chemical nutrients like carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium, and water etc. through the biological and physical world are known as biogeochemical cycle. In effect, the element is recycled, although in some cycles there may be places (called reservoirs) where the element is accumulated or held for a long period of time (such as an ocean or lake for water). Water, for example, is always recycled through the water cycle, as shown in the diagram. The water undergoes evaporation, condensation, and precipitation, falling back to Earth clean and fresh. Elements, chemical compounds, and other forms of matter are passed from one organism to another and from one part of the biosphere to another through the biogeochemical cycles.[1][2]

Contents

Systems

Chloroplasts conduct photosynthesis and are found in plant cells and other eukaryotic organisms. These are Chloroplasts visible in the cells of Plagiomnium affine — Many-fruited Thyme-moss.

Ecological systems (ecosystems) have many biogeochemical cycles operating as a part of the system, for example the water cycle, the carbon cycle, the nitrogen cycle, etc. All chemical elements occurring in organisms are part of biogeochemical cycles. In addition to being a part of living organisms, these chemical elements also cycle through abiotic factors of ecosystems such as water (hydrosphere), land (lithosphere), and/or the air (atmosphere). The living factors of the planet can be referred to collectively as the biosphere. All the nutrients—such as carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulfur—used in ecosystems by living organisms are a part of a closed system; therefore, these chemicals are recycled instead of being lost and replenished constantly such as in an open system.[3]

The flow of energy in an ecosystem is an open system; the sun constantly gives the planet energy in the form of light while it is eventually used and lost in the form of heat throughout the trophic levels of a food web. Carbon is used to make carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, the major sources of food energy. These compounds are oxidized to release carbon dioxide, which can be captured by plants to make organic compounds. The chemical reaction is powered by the light energy of the sun.

It is possible for an ecosystem to obtain energy without sunlight. Carbon must be combined with hydrogen and oxygen in order to be utilized as an energy source, and this process depends on sunlight. Ecosystems in the deep sea, where no sunlight can penetrate, use sulfur. Hydrogen sulfide near hydrothermal vents can be utilized by organisms such as the giant tube worm. In the sulfur cycle, sulfur can be forever recycled as a source of energy. Energy can be released through the oxidation and reduction of sulfur compounds (e.g., oxidizing elemental sulfur to sulfite and then to sulfate).

Although the Earth constantly receives energy from the sun, its chemical composition is essentially fixed, as additional matter is only occasionally added by meteorites. Because this chemical composition is not replenished like energy, all processes that depend on these chemicals must be recycled. These cycles include both the living biosphere and the nonliving lithosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere.

Reservoirs

Coal is a reservoir of carbon

The chemicals are sometimes held for long periods of time in one place. This place is called a reservoir, which, for example, includes such things as coal deposits that are storing carbon for a long period of time.[4] When chemicals are held for only short periods of time, they are being held in exchange pools. Examples of exchange pools include plants and animals.[4] Plants and animals utilize carbon to produce carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, which can then be used to build their internal structures or to obtain energy. Plants and animals temporarily use carbon in their systems and then release it back into the air or surrounding medium. Generally, reservoirs are abiotic factors whereas exchange pools are biotic factors.[5] Carbon is held for a relatively short time in plants and animals in comparison to coal deposits. The amount of time that a chemical is held in one place is called its residence.[4]

Important cycles

The most well-known and important biogeochemical cycles, for example, include the carbon cycle, the nitrogen cycle, the oxygen cycle, the phosphorus cycle, the sulfur cycle and the water cycle. There are many biogeochemical cycles that are currently being studied for the first time as climate change and human impacts are drastically changing the speed, intensity, and balance of these relatively unknown cycles. These newly studied biogeochemical cycles include the mercury cycle[6] and the human-caused cycle of atrazine, which may affect certain species.

Biogeochemical cycles always involve hot equilibrium states: a balance in the cycling of the element between compartments. However, overall balance may involve compartments distributed on a global scale.

As biogeochemical cycles describe the movements of substances on the entire globe, the study of these is inherently multidiciplinary. The carbon cycle may be related to research in ecology and atmospheric sciences.[7] Biochemical dynamics would also be related to the fields of geology and pedology (soil study).[8]

Global biogeochemical cycles critical for life
Diagram of the nitrogen cycle
Diagram of the water cycle
Diagram of the carbon cycle
Diagram of the oxygen cycle
Diagram of the phosphorus cycle

See also

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • biogeochemical cycle — [bī΄ō jē΄ō kem′i kəl] n. the cycle in which nitrogen, carbon, and other inorganic elements of the soil, atmosphere, etc. of a region are converted into the organic substances of animals or plants and released back into the environment * * * ▪… …   Universalium

  • biogeochemical cycle — [bī΄ō jē΄ō kem′i kəl] n. the cycle in which nitrogen, carbon, and other inorganic elements of the soil, atmosphere, etc. of a region are converted into the organic substances of animals or plants and released back into the environment …   English World dictionary

  • biogeochemical cycle — biogeocheminis ciklas statusas T sritis ekologija ir aplinkotyra apibrėžtis Pagrindinių cheminių elementų (anglies, vandenilio, deguonies, azoto, fosforo, kalio, sieros, kalcio) judėjimas ratu iš aplinkos į organizmą ir iš organizmo į aplinką.… …   Ekologijos terminų aiškinamasis žodynas

  • biogeochemical cycle — biogeocheminė apytaka statusas T sritis ekologija ir aplinkotyra apibrėžtis Ekosistemos medžiagų apytaka – į neorganines molekules susijungę cheminiai elementai migruoja ekosistemose (dirvožemyje, vandenyje, atmosferoje), o susijungę į organines… …   Ekologijos terminų aiškinamasis žodynas

  • biogeochemical cycle — /baɪoʊdʒioʊˈkɛmɪkəl saɪkəl/ (say buyohjeeoh kemikuhl suykuhl) noun any of the global environmental cycles involving the movement of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen, calcium and sulphur between biotic and abiotic environments, whether… …   Australian English dictionary

  • Cycle Biogéochimique — En écologie et plus généralement en sciences de la Terre, un cycle biogéochimique est le processus de transport et de transformation cyclique d un élément ou composé chimique entre les grandes réservoirs que sont la géosphère, l atmosphère, l… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Cycle biogeochimique — Cycle biogéochimique En écologie et plus généralement en sciences de la Terre, un cycle biogéochimique est le processus de transport et de transformation cyclique d un élément ou composé chimique entre les grandes réservoirs que sont la géosphère …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Cycle biogéochimique — En écologie et plus généralement en sciences de la Terre, un cycle biogéochimique est le processus de transport et de transformation cyclique d un élément ou composé chimique entre les grands réservoirs que sont la géosphère, l atmosphère, l… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • biogeochemical — adjective relating to the cycle in which chemical elements and simple substances are transferred between living systems and the environment. Derivatives biogeochemist noun biogeochemistry noun …   English new terms dictionary

  • Nutrient cycle — …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.