Compromise


Compromise

To compromise is to make a deal where one person gives up part of his or her demand. In arguments, compromise is a concept of finding agreement through communication, through a mutual acceptance of terms—often involving variations from an original goal or desire. Extremism is often considered as antonym to compromise, which, depending on context, may be associated with concepts of balance, tolerance. In the negative connotation, compromise may be referred to as capitulation, referring to a "surrender" of objectives, principles, or material, in the process of negotiating an agreement. In human relationships "compromise" is frequently said to be an agreement that no party is happy with, this is because the parties involved often feel that they either gave away too much or that they received too little.[1]

Studies in compromise

Defining and finding the best possible compromise is an important problem in fields like game theory and the voting system.

Research has indicated that suboptimal compromises are often the result of negotiators failing to realize when they have interests that are completely compatible with those of the other party and settle for suboptimal agreements. Mutually better outcomes can often be found by careful investigation of both parties' interests, especially if done early in negotiations. [2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Global Knowledge (2008). "Methods of Dealing with Conflict - Part II". PM Hut. http://www.pmhut.com/methods-of-dealing-with-conflict-part-ii. Retrieved 2010-01-11. 
  2. ^ Thompson, Leigh; R. Hastie (1990). "Organizational Behavior & Human Decision Processes (Issue 47)". Social perception in negotiation. Academic Press. pp. 98–123. http://www.leighthompson.com/publications/pub90d.htm. Retrieved 2009-08-17. 

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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • COMPROMISE — (Heb. פְּשָׁרָה, pesharah; apparently derived from the term pesher, solution, Eccles. 8:1), deciding a civil law dispute (dinei mamonot) by the court or an arbitral body, through the exercise of their discretion and not according to the laws… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • compromise — com·pro·mise 1 n: an agreement resolving differences by mutual concessions esp. to prevent or end a lawsuit compromise 2 vb mised, mis·ing vt: to resolve or dispose of by a compromise cases in which a dispute is compromised E. A. Farnsworth and W …   Law dictionary

  • Compromise — Com pro*mise, n. [F. compromis, fr. L. compromissum a mutual promise to abide by the decision of an arbiter, fr. compromittere to make such a promise; com + promittere to promise. See {Promise}.] 1. A mutual agreement to refer matters in dispute… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • compromise — [n] agreement, give and take accommodation, accord, adjustment, arrangement, bargain, compact, composition, concession, contract, copout*, covenant, deal, fifty fifty*, half and half, half measure, happy medium*, mean, middle course, middle… …   New thesaurus

  • compromise — [käm′prə mīz΄] n. [ME & OFr compromis < LL compromissum, a compromise, mutual promise < L compromissus, pp. of compromittere, to make a mutual promise to abide by an arbiter s decision < com , together + promittere, to PROMISE] 1. a… …   English World dictionary

  • Compromise — Com pro*mise, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Compromised}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Compromising}.] [From {Compromise}, n.; cf. {Compromit}.] 1. To bind by mutual agreement; to agree. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Laban and himself were compromised That all the eanlings… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Compromise — Com pro*mise, v. i. 1. To agree; to accord. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. To make concession for conciliation and peace. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • compromise — (n.) early 15c., a joint promise to abide by an arbiter s decision, from M.Fr. compromis (13c.), from L. compromissus, pp. of compromittere to make a mutual promise (to abide by an arbiter s decision), from com together (see COM (Cf. com )) +… …   Etymology dictionary

  • compromise — ► NOUN 1) an agreement reached by each side making concessions. 2) an intermediate state between conflicting opinions, reached by mutual concession. ► VERB 1) settle a dispute by mutual concession. 2) expediently accept standards that are lower… …   English terms dictionary

  • compromise — ▪ I. compromise com‧pro‧mise 1 [ˈkɒmprəmaɪz ǁ ˈkɑːm ] noun [countable, uncountable] an agreement between two people or groups in which both sides agree to accept less than they first asked for and to give up something that they value: •… …   Financial and business terms

  • compromise — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun ADJECTIVE ▪ acceptable, fair, good, happy (esp. BrE), possible, pragmatic, reasonable, sensible, suitable ▪ …   Collocations dictionary


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