Nuclear power by country


Nuclear power by country
The Cattenom Nuclear Power Plant in France. France produces around three quarters of its electricity by nuclear power.[1]
The Grafenrheinfeld Nuclear Power Plant in Germany. Chancellor Angela Merkel's coalition announced on May 30, 2011, that Germany’s 17 nuclear power stations will be shut down by 2022, in a policy reversal following Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.[2]

Thirty countries operate nuclear power stations, and there are a considerable number of new reactors being built in China, South Korea, India, Pakistan, and Russia.[3] As of June 2011, Germany and Switzerland are phasing-out nuclear power.[4][5]

As of June 2011, countries such as Australia, Austria, Denmark, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Portugal, Israel, Malaysia, New Zealand, and Norway remain opposed to nuclear power.[4][6]

Contents

Overview

Of the thirty countries which operate nuclear power plants, only France uses them as its primary source of electricity, although many countries have a significant nuclear power generation capacity. Some nations have plans to start a nuclear power program; these include OECD members, such as Poland, and developing countries, such as Bangladesh and Vietnam.[7] China, South Korea and India are pursuing an ambitious expansion of their nuclear power capacities. China is aiming to increase nuclear power generation capacity to 200 GW by 2020. South Korea is constructing seven reactors with combined capacity of 8.6 GW, all of which will be operationalised by 2017. India's Nuclear power expansion program is the third largest in the world next only to China & South Korea. In India, seven reactors with a combined capacity of 5.3 GW are under construction.

Country Megawatt capacity Nuclear share of
electricity production
Argentina Argentina 935 7.0%
Armenia Armenia 376 45.0%
Belgium Belgium 5,943 51.7%
Brazil Brazil 1,901 3.0%
Bulgaria Bulgaria 1,906 35.9%
Canada Canada 12,679 14.8%
China China 10,234 1.9%
Czech Republic Czech Republic 3,686 33.8%
Finland Finland 2,721 32.9%
France France 63,236 75.2%
Germany Germany 20,339 26.1%
Hungary Hungary 1,880 43.0%
India India 4,780 2.9%
Japan Japan 47,348 28.9%
South Korea Korea, South (ROK) 18,716 31.1%
Mexico Mexico 1,310 4.8%
Netherlands Netherlands 485 3.7%
Pakistan Pakistan 725 2.7%
Romania Romania 1,310 20.6%
Russia Russia 23,084 17.8%
Slovakia Slovakia 1,760 53.5%
Slovenia Slovenia

and Croatia Croatia

696 37.9% + 8.0%
South Africa South Africa 1,800 4.8%
Spain Spain 7,448 17.5%
Sweden Sweden 9,399 37.4%
Switzerland Switzerland 3,252 39.5%
Republic of China Taiwan (ROC) 4,927 20.7%
Ukraine Ukraine 13,168 48.6%
United Kingdom United Kingdom 10,962 17.9%
United States United States 101,229 20.2%
World 378,910 14%

References:[1][8]

The status of nuclear power globally:
  Operating reactors, building new reactors
  Operating reactors, planning new build
  No reactors, building new reactors
  No reactors, planning new build
  Operating reactors, stable
  Operating reactors, considering phase-out
  Civil nuclear power is illegal
  No reactors
Nations based on nuclear output on national power output.

Nuclear power output in megawatts

Country/region Operable Suspended Decommissioned Shut down Construction Planned Cancelled
 United States 97,603 3,603 2,340 6,675 3,704
 France 61,443 600 40 2,623 1,600 1,600
 Japan 43,692 13
 Germany 20,844 4,936 1,358
 Russia 19,897 950 248 1,701 2,825 9,850 2,850
 South Korea 18,716 8,600 5,600
 Ukraine 13,045 1,900 4,750
 Canada 12,728 1,364
 United Kingdom 10,306 5,452 466 5,232
 Sweden 10,002
 Spain 7,085 2,797 480 2,950
 Belgium 5,712
 Taiwan 4,884
 India 4,780 [9] 4,800 [10]
 Czech Republic[11] 3,830 2,000
 Bulgaria 2,000
 Switzerland 2,985 9
 Lithuania 2,760
 Finland 2,520
 China 2,100 3,100
 South Africa 1,840
 Hungary 1,729
 Slovakia 1,632 840 104 824
 Mexico 1,308
 Argentina 935 692
 Pakistan 725 300
 Brazil 626 1,229 1,229
 Slovenia 620
 Romania 620 620 620
 Netherlands 452 55
 Armenia 440 440
 Kazakhstan 135
 Cuba 834
 Philippines 605
 Italy 1,423

List of nuclear reactors by country

Only the commercial reactors registered with the International Atomic Energy Agency are listed below. If a country does not appear in this table, it means it has no nuclear power plants and no current plans to build them. Research reactors are not included in the list.

Country Operating Under
construction
Planned References and notes
Argentina Argentina 2 1 2
Armenia Armenia 1 0 1 Replacement[12]
 Bangladesh 0 0 1 [13]
 Belarus 0 0 2
Belgium Belgium 7 0 0
Brazil Brazil 2 1 0 [14]
Bulgaria Bulgaria 2 0 2 Four reactors were shutdown in 2004 and 2007.
Canada Canada 18 2 4
China China 13 27 50 70 GWe by 2020(~5%)[15]
 Croatia 1 0 0 The reactor is in Slovenia, but 50% is owned by Croatia
Czech Republic Czech Republic 6 0 2
Egypt Egypt 0 0 1 Four plants by 2025?[16][17] with help and training from Russia, Korea, US, France, China, and Australia.[18]
Finland Finland 4 1 0 [19]
France France 58 1 1
Germany Germany 17 0 0 Phase-out in place.
Hungary Hungary 4 0 0
India India 20 4 20
Indonesia Indonesia 0 0 2
 Iran 0 1 2 The Bushehr reactor has been loaded with fuel, but is not connected to the grid yet.[20]
Japan Japan 55 2 12
 Kazakhstan 0 0 2
South Korea Korea, South (ROK) 21 7 4
Mexico Mexico 2 0 0
Netherlands Netherlands 1 0 0
Pakistan Pakistan 3 1 2
Poland Poland 0 0 6
Romania Romania 2 0 2
Russia Russia 32 10 14
Slovakia Slovakia 4 2 0
Slovenia Slovenia 1 0 0
South Africa South Africa 2 0 3
Spain Spain 8 0 0 Stable[21]
Sweden Sweden 10 0 0
Switzerland Switzerland 5 0 0 Phase-out in place.
Republic of China Taiwan (ROC) 6 2 1
 Thailand 0 0 2
Turkey Turkey 0 0 4 To be built by Japan, Russia and South-Korea[22][23]
Ukraine Ukraine 15 0 2 2 new reactors by 2030[24][25]
United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates 0 0 4 To be built by 2017 by S. Korean consortium?[26]
United Kingdom United Kingdom 19 0 4
United States United States 104 1 9
Vietnam Vietnam 0 0 4
World 441 60 150

References:[1][8]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "World Nuclear Power Reactors & Uranium Requirements". World Nuclear Association. 2010-10-01. http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/reactors.html. Retrieved 2010-10-23. 
  2. ^ Annika Breidthardt (May 30, 2011). "German government wants nuclear exit by 2022 at latest". Reuters. http://uk.reuters.com/article/2011/05/30/us-germany-nuclear-idUKTRE74Q2P120110530. 
  3. ^ Michael Dittmar. Taking stock of nuclear renaissance that never was Sydney Morning Herald, August 18, 2010.
  4. ^ a b Duroyan Fertl (June 5, 2011). "Germany: Nuclear power to be phased out by 2022". Green Left. http://www.greenleft.org.au/node/47834. 
  5. ^ James Kanter (May 25, 2011). "Switzerland Decides on Nuclear Phase-Out". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/26/business/global/26nuclear.html?_r=1. 
  6. ^ "Nuclear power: When the steam clears". The Economist. March 24, 2011. http://www.economist.com/node/18441163. 
  7. ^ http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/inf102.html World Nuclear Association - Emerging Nuclear Energy Countries
  8. ^ a b Nuclear Power Plant Information, International Atomic Energy Agency, URL accessed 12 June 2006
  9. ^ "India's 20th nuclear power plant goes critical". Hindustan Times. 2010-11-27. http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/bangalore/India-s-20th-nuclear-power-plant-goes-critical/Article1-631532.aspx. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  10. ^ "Status of Projects under construction- NPCIL". NPCIL official website. 2011-07-18. http://www.npcil.nic.in/main/ProjectConstructionStatus.aspx. Retrieved 2011-07-18. 
  11. ^ "CEZ Group Nuclear Power Plants 2009 annual report". Cez.cz. http://www.cez.cz/en/power-plants-and-environment/nuclear-power-plants/annual-report.html. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  12. ^ "USA supports new nuclear build in Armenia". World Nuclear News. 2007-11-23. http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/newNuclear/USA_supports_new_nuclear_build_in_Armenia-231107.shtml?jmid=1165903138. Retrieved 2007-11-25. 
  13. ^ "Bangladesh signs up for nuclear power". 2011-05-16. http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/MC16Df01.html. Retrieved 2011-07-26. 
  14. ^ Agência Estado (12-09-2008). "Lobão diz que país fará uma usina nuclear por ano em 50 anos" (in Portuguese). G1.globo.com. http://g1.globo.com/Noticias/Economia_Negocios/0,,MUL758157-9356,00-LOBAO+DIZ+QUE+PAIS+FARA+UMA+USINA+NUCLEAR+POR+ANO+EM+ANOS.html. Retrieved 2008-10-15. 
  15. ^ "Nuclear Power in China". World Nuclear Association. September 2008. http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/inf63.html. Retrieved 2008-09-22. 
  16. ^ Egypt To Construct Four Nuclear Power Plants By 2025
  17. ^ "Egypt to have 4 nuclear power plants by 2025". English.people.com.cn. 2010-07-16. http://english.people.com.cn/90001/90777/90855/7069804.html. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  18. ^ "Egypt, Russia - Training Cooperation in Nuclear Power". English.globalarabnetwork.com. 2010-07-09. http://www.english.globalarabnetwork.com/201007096495/Energy/egypt-russia-training-cooperation-in-nuclear-power.html. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  19. ^ "Kolme uutta reaktoria, Jees!". Tekniikka ja talous. 2009-10-15. http://www.tekniikkatalous.fi/kommentit/uutiskommentti/article54930.ece. Retrieved 2009-12-03. 
  20. ^ "Fuel loading starts at Bushehr 1". World Nuclear News. 2010-08-23. http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/newsarticle.aspx?id=28276. Retrieved 2010-10-22. 
  21. ^ Nuclear power in Spain, World Nuclear Association, URL accessed 13 June 2006
  22. ^ "Turkey, South Korea eye more business". Hürriyet Daily News. 2010-04-12. http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/n.php?n=turkey-south-korea-eye-more-business-2010-04-12. Retrieved 2010-04-16. 
  23. ^ "Turkey, Japan could reach deal on nuclear plant, minister says". Hürriyet Daily News. 2011-02-09. http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/n.php?n=minister-says-turkey-japan-could-reach-deal-on-nuke-plant--2011-02-09. Retrieved 2011-03-03. 
  24. ^ "BBC NEWS | Politics | New nuclear plants get go-ahead". News.bbc.co.uk. Last Updated:. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/7179579.stm. Retrieved 2008-10-15. 
  25. ^ "Nuclear Power in Ukraine". World Nuclear Association. August 2008. http://world-nuclear.org/info/inf46.html. Retrieved 2008-09-22. 
  26. ^ "Saudi readies nuclear energy agreement with France". Af.reuters.com. 2010-07-05. http://af.reuters.com/article/energyOilNews/idAFLDE6641DG20100705?pageNumber=2&virtualBrandChannel=0. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 

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