Roman Catholicism in Montenegro


Roman Catholicism in Montenegro

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The Catholic Church in Montenegro is a part of the worldwide Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope and curia in Rome. There are 22,000 Catholics in Montenegro, and they form three and a half percent of the population.

Most Roman Catholics are ethnic Albanians and Croats as well as some Montenegrins.

Within Montenegro the Latin Rite Catholic hierarchy consists of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Bar.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Kotor is geographically located in Montenegro, but it is administratively part of the church in Croatia and is subject to the Split-Makarska Archbishopric of that country. The Diocese of Kotor (the venetian Cattaro) is exactly the Albania Veneta of the Republic of Venice, ended by Napoleon in 1797 (the Albania Veneta was mostly catholic and venetian speaking).

Eastern Rite Catholics

According to [http://www.cnewacanada.ca/ecc-bodypg-ca.aspx?eccpageID=73&IndexView=toc CNEWA Canada] Catholics of the Byzantine Rite number over 20 000 persons in the regions of Montenegro and Serbia:

In 2003 an Apostolic Exarchate was created for Greek Catholics in Serbia and Montenegro, headed by Bishop Djura Džudžar (born 1954, appointed 2003). It has 21 parishes and 22,720 faithful, consisting mostly of a group of ethnic Rusyn Greek Catholics in the region of Vojvodina. [http://www.cnewacanada.ca/ecc-bodypg-ca.aspx?eccpageID=73&IndexView=toc]

Demographics

According to the 2004 official demographic data, of the total 21,972 Roman Catholics:
* 8,126 Albanians ("36.98%")
* 6,811 Croats ("31%")
* 5,000 Montenegrins ("22.76%")
* 2,035 others ("9.26%")

See also

*Eastern Catholic Churches

External links

*CathEncy|wstitle=Montenegro


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