Convocation


Convocation

A Convocation (Latin 'calling together', translating the Greek ecclesia) is a group of people formally assembled for a special purpose.

Contents

University use

In some universities, the term "convocation" refers specifically to the entirety of the alumni of a college which function as one of the university's representative bodies. Due to its inordinate size, the Convocation will elect a standing committee, which is responsible for making representations concerning the views of the alumni to the university administration. The convocation also, however, can hold general meetings, at which any alumnus can attend. The main function of the convocation is to represent the views of the alumni to the university administration, to encourage co-operation among alumni (esp. in regard to donations), and to elect members of the University's governing body (known variously as the Senate, Council, Board, etc., depending on the particular institution, but basically equivalent to a board of directors of a corporation.) The equivalent of the Convocation in the Scottish University system is the General Council.

In the University of Oxford, Convocation was originally the main governing body of the University, consisting of all doctors and masters of the University, but it now comprises all graduates of the university and its only remaining function is to elect the Chancellor of the University and the Professor of Poetry.[1][2]

At Durham University, the Convocation appoints the Chancellor of the University, most recently the American author Bill Bryson on 4 April 2005.

In the University of London, convocation, between its establishment in 1858 and its abolition in 2003, consisted of the university's graduates who were involved in the university's governance. After 1900, convocation had the power to elect the chancellor.

At some universities and colleges (e.g. University of Chicago, Cornell University, Teachers College, Columbia University, University of Illinois, and most universities in Canada and India), graduation events are called "convocations," as opposed to commencements in other universities. At the University of Toronto, convocation events are held at a specific venue named Convocation Hall. At other universities such as Syracuse University, University of Oklahoma, and University of Utah, graduation ceremonies consist of both a commencement and a convocation with the commencement being the larger, university-wide ceremony and the individual colleges presenting degrees at a convocation.

At other colleges such as University of Cincinnati, California State University, East Bay, Miami University, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Simpson College, Stanford University, Dartmouth College, The College of William and Mary, and Marymount University, convocation refers to a formal ceremony in which arriving freshmen are welcomed and may sign the College "matricula", a ceremonial parchment that contains the names of all of the students and alumni.

At Liberty University, Convocation is an hour on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays between 10:00am and 11:00am when students gather for Christian worship and a motivational speaker. No classes are held at these times.

At Loyola Marymount University, Convocation is an hour on Tuesdays and Thursdays between 12:00pm and 1:00pm where all the student assemble and no classes are held.[citation needed]

At Emporia State University, Convocation is an hour on Tuesdays at 10:00am during which music major students perform for each other in student soloist concerts.

New Zealand universities have courts of convocation by which all graduates elect representatives to the institutions' governing bodies.[3][4][5][6][7][8]

Graduation

In many universities throughout the world (including countries such as Canada, Ukraine (National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy), Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka) convocation is the university graduation ceremony to award degrees to students and honorary graduates.[9]

Ecclesiastical convocations

Convocation is also a synodical assembly of a church.

It is the name of the assemblies of the two Provinces of the Church of England, the Convocations of Canterbury and York, and various other assemblies of other churches. These two bodies of the Church of England were prorogued by Royal Writ in 1717, because of conflict between Whig Bishops and the clergy in the Bangorian controversy. They were revived in the 19th century, Canterbury in 1852 and York in 1861. They were exclusively clerical assemblies until 1885, when a House of Laity was added to each Convocation. At the beginning of the twentieth century, joint meetings of both Convocations formed a Representative Council which, having no power or legal authority, was superseded in 1920 by the Church Assembly. The Convocations still exist but legal power now rests with the General Synod set up in the 1970s.

Other uses

References

  1. ^ Oxford University Archives: A history of Congregation and Convocation, 5. The mid 20th century.
  2. ^ Oxford University Archives: A history of Congregation and Convocation, 7. The 2000 reforms
  3. ^ "Massey University Act 1963 No 7 (as at 29 November 2010), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011 [last update]. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1963/0007/latest/whole.html. Retrieved 30 October 2011. "Court of Convocation" 
  4. ^ "University of Waikato Act 1963 No 8 (as at 29 November 2010), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011 [last update]. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1963/0008/latest/whole.html. Retrieved 30 October 2011. "Court of Convocation" 
  5. ^ "Victoria University of Wellington Act 1961 No 51 (as at 29 November 2010), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011 [last update]. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1961/0051/latest/whole.html. Retrieved 30 October 2011. "University District and Court of Convocation" 
  6. ^ "Lincoln University Act 1961 No 52 (as at 29 November 2010), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011 [last update]. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1961/0052/latest/whole.html. Retrieved 30 October 2011. "Court of Convocation" 
  7. ^ "University of Auckland Act 1961 No 50 (as at 29 November 2010), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011 [last update]. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1961/0050/latest/whole.html. Retrieved 30 October 2011. "University District and Court of Convocation" 
  8. ^ "University of Canterbury Act 1961 No 49 (as at 29 November 2010), Public Act – New Zealand Legislation". legislation.govt.nz. 2011 [last update]. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1961/0049/latest/whole.html. Retrieved 30 October 2011. "University District and Court of Convocation" 
  9. ^ Convocation at Memorial University.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • convocation — [ kɔ̃vɔkasjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1341; lat. convocatio 1 ♦ Action de convoquer (qqn, un ensemble de personnes). ⇒ appel. Convocation urgente. Demander la convocation de l Assemblée nationale. Convocation adressée aux parties pour comparaître devant une… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Convocation — Con vo*ca tion, n. [L. convocatio: cf. F. convocation. See {Convoke}.] 1. The act of calling or assembling by summons. [1913 Webster] 2. An assembly or meeting. [1913 Webster] In the first day there shall be a holy convocation. Ex. xii. 16. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • convocation — CONVOCATION. sub. f. Action de convoquer. La convocation d une Assemblée, des Pairs, d un Concile, des Etats. C est lui qui doit faire la convocation de l Assemblée …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • convocation — Convocation. s. f. Action de convoquer. La convocation d une assemblée, d un Concile, des Estats. c est luy qui doit faire la convocation …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • convocation — (n.) late 14c., assembly of persons, from O.Fr. convocation and directly from L. convocationem (nom. convocatio), from convocat , pp. stem of convocare to call together, from com together (see COM (Cf. com )) + vocare to call, from vox …   Etymology dictionary

  • Convocation — (v. lat.), 1) Zusammenberufung; 2) zur Zeit des Deutschen Reichs, gemäß der Goldenen Bulle, von dem Kurfürsten zu Mainz erlassene Zusammenberufung der Reichsstände zur Kaiserwahl; ebenso Convocationsreichstag, sonst in Polen der Reichstag nach… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Convocation — (spr. konwŏkēsch n), Bezeichnung für die Provinzialsynoden der englischen Hochkirche, deren 1717 unterbrochene Wirksamkeit seit 1852 wieder bedeutungsvoll geworden ist. Es gibt ihrer zwei, für den Sprengel des Erzbistums Canterbury und für… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Convocation — (engl., spr. wokehsch n), s. Konvokation …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Convocation — Convocation, lat., Zusammenberufung; in England die allgemeine Versammlung der Geistlichkeit der Hochkirche, in Oberhaus und Unterhaus (Bischöfe und Pfarrer) geschieden, jedoch schon lange nicht mehr zusammenberufen. – Convociren, zusammenberufen …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • convocation — index assemblage, assembly, caucus, chamber (body), commission (agency), company (assemblage) …   Law dictionary

  • convocation — [n] assembly assemblage, conclave, concourse, confab*, conference, congregation, congress, convention, council, diet, get together, meet, meeting, powwow*, synod, turnout; concept 114 …   New thesaurus


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