Condensation


Condensation
Water vapour condenses into a liquid after making contact with the surface of a cold bottle.
Condensation forming over the wing of an aircraft in a low pressure zone

Condensation is the change of the physical state of matter from gaseous phase into liquid phase, and is the reverse of vaporization.[1] When the transition happens from the gaseous phase into the solid phase directly, the change is called deposition.

Condensation is initiated by the formation of atomic/molecular clusters of that species within its gaseous volume—like rain drop or snow-flake formation within clouds—or at the contact between such gaseous phase and a (solvent) liquid or solid surface.

A few distinct reversibility scenarios emerge here with respect to the nature of the surface.

  • absorption into the surface of a liquid (either of the same species or one of its solvents)—is reversible as evaporation.[1]
  • adsorption (as dew droplets) onto solid surface at pressures and temperatures higher than the specie's triple point—also reversible as evaporation.
  • adsorption onto solid surface (as supplemental layers of solid) at pressures and temperatures lower than the specie's triple point—is reversible as sublimation.

Condensation commonly occurs when a vapour is cooled and/or compressed to its saturation limit when the molecular density in the gas phase reaches its maximal threshold. Vapour cooling and compressing equipment that collects condensed liquids is called "condenser".

Psychrometry measures the rates of condensation from and evaporation into the air moisture at various atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Water is the product of its vapour condensation—condensation is the process of such phase conversion.

Contents

Applications of condensation

Condensation is a crucial component of distillation, an important laboratory and industrial chemistry application.

Because condensation is a naturally occurring phenomenon, it can often be used to generate water in large quantities for human use. Many structures are made solely for the purpose of collecting water from condensation, such as air wells and fog fences. Such systems can often be used to retain soil moisture in areas where active desertification is occurring—so much so that some organizations educate people living in affected areas about water condensers to help them deal effectively with the situation.[2]

It is also a crucial process in forming particle tracks in a Cloud Chamber. In this case, ions produced by an incident particle act as nucleation centres for the vapour to condense on.

Biological adaptation

Numerous living organisms use water made accessible by condensation. A few examples are the Australian Thorny Devil, Darkling beetles on the Namibian coast and Coast Redwoods on the west coast of the United States.

Condensation in building construction

Condensation on a window during a rain shower.

Condensation in building construction is an unwanted phenomenon as it may cause dampness, mold health issues, wood rot, corrosion and energy loss due to increased heat transfer.

Interstructure condensation may be caused by thermal bridges, insufficient or lacking damp proofing or insulated glazing.[3]

See also

Notes

References

External links


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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • condensation — [ kɔ̃dɑ̃sasjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1361; lat. imp. condensatio 1 ♦ Passage d un corps de la phase gazeuse à une des phases condensées, liquide ou solide; action de condenser. Point de condensation (cf. Point de rosée). ⇒ saturation. Condensation de la… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Condensation — Con den*sa tion, n. [L. condensatio: cf. F. condensation.] 1. The act or process of condensing or of being condensed; the state of being condensed. [1913 Webster] He [Goldsmith] was a great and perhaps an unequaled master of the arts of selection …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • condensation — CONDENSATION. s. f. Terme de Physique, qui se dit par opposition à Raréfaction, et qui signifie L action par laquelle un corps est ren du plus dense, plus compacte, plus serré. La condensation de l air …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • condensation — [n1] abridgment abstract, boildown*, breviary, brief, compendium, compression, concentration, consolidation, conspectus, contraction, curtailment, digest, epitome, essence, précis, reduction, summary, synopsis; concepts 283,730 Ant. unabridgment… …   New thesaurus

  • condensation — Condensation. s. f. v. Action par laquelle un corps est condensé. Il se dit aussi de l effet de la condensation …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • condensation — [kän΄dən sā′shən] n. [LL condensatio] 1. the act of condensing, as the reduction of a gas to a liquid or the abridgment of a piece of writing 2. the product of such an act [to read a condensation of a novel] 3. the condition of being condensed …   English World dictionary

  • condensation — index abstract, adhesion (affixing), brief, capsule, centralization, compendium, congealment, curtailment …   Law dictionary

  • condensation — c.1600, action of becoming more dense, from L. condensationem (nom. condensatio), noun of action from condensare (see CONDENSE (Cf. condense)). Meaning conversion of a gas to a liquid is from 1610s …   Etymology dictionary

  • condensation — ► NOUN 1) water from humid air collecting as droplets on a cold surface. 2) the conversion of a vapour or gas to a liquid. 3) a concise version of something …   English terms dictionary

  • Condensation — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Condensation (homonymie). En thermodynamique, la condensation désigne le passage d un corps pur de l état gazeux directement à l état solide, sans passer par l état liquide[1]. Pour la terminologie des… …   Wikipédia en Français


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