Al-Mu'tamid ibn Abbad


Al-Mu'tamid ibn Abbad
Coin of Al-Mutamid

Muhammad Ibn Abbad Al Mutamid (1040–1095) was the third and last ruler (reigned 1069–1091) of the taifa of Seville in Al-Andalus. He was a member of the Abbadid dynasty.

After the death of his father Abbad II al-Mu'tadid in 1069, he inherited Seville. In 1071, he attempted to seize neighboring Córdoba. He lost Córdoba in 1075 but regained it in 1078.

Al-Mu'tamid supported the Almoravid ruler Yusuf ibn Tashfin against king Alfonso VI of Castile in the Battle of Sagrajas in 1086. In 1091, however, his kingdom was overthrown by the Almoravids and he was deposed.

Al-Mu'tamid was bisexual. He was lover and patron to the Andalusi Arabic poet Ibn Ammar. His father disapproved of relations with a commoner and exiled the poet in order to separate them. On his succession, however, al-Mu'tamid granted Ibn Ammar political and military power. Their relationship was reportedly stormy, and came to an end when Al-Mu'tamid killed the poet with his own hands, only to bury him with great honors.[1] He is also considered, in his own right, one of the greatest of the Andalusi poets. Also the Sicilian Arabic poet Ibn Hamdis was guest and friend of his.

In 1091 Al-Mutamid was taken into captivity by the Almoravids and exiled to Aghmat, Morocco where he died in 1095. His grave is located in the outskirts of Aghmat.[2]

Al-Mu'tamid was the father-in-law, through his son, Fath al-Mamun (d. 1091), of Zaida, mistress, and possibly wife, of Alfonso VI of Castile.[citation needed]

See also

  • Abbadid dynasty


References

  1. ^ Crompton, Louis (2006), Homosexuality and civilization, Harvard University Press, p. 167, ISBN 978-0-674-02233-1 
  2. ^ Lisan Al Din Ibn Al Khatib (14th-century). Nafadhat al-jirab (the Ashtray of the Socks). pp. 9. 

Sources

  • Souissi, Ridha (1977). Al Mutamid Ibn Abbad et son oeuvre poétique : étude des thèmes. Université de Tunis. 
  • Scheindlin, Raymond P. (1974). Form and structure in the poetry of Al-Mutamid Ibn Abbad. Leiden: Brill. 
  • Hagerty ed., Miguel José (1979). Poesia / Al-Mutamid. Barcelona: Antoni Bosch. 
  • Rubiera Mata ed., María Jesús (1982). Poesías / Al Mutamid Ibn Abbad. Madrid: Universidad de Sevilla. 

External links


Preceded by
Abbad II al-Mu'tadid
Abbadid dynasty
1069–1091
Succeeded by
Deposed by Yusuf ibn Tashfin (Almoravid dynasty)

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Al Mutamid Ibn Abbad — Abbad III, connu sous le nom de Abû al Qâsim Muhammad “Al Mu tamid” ben Abbad[1] (1040 1095), est le fils et successeur de Abbad II al Mu tadid. Biographie Le royaume de Séville sous …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Al-Mutamid Ibn Abbad — Abbad III, connu sous le nom de Abû al Qâsim Muhammad “Al Mu tamid” ben Abbad[1] (1040 1095), est le fils et successeur de Abbad II al Mu tadid. Biographie Il hérita de son père le talent poétique et le caractère impitoyable. Il lui succéda sur… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Abbad — is an Islamic name. People with this name include:* Abbad ibn Bishr (circa 606–632), from the Arabian peninsula and companion to the prophet Muhammad * Abbad I or Abu al Qasim Muhammad ibn Abbad (ruled from 1023 and died in 1042), founder of the… …   Wikipedia

  • Ibn Zaydun — Ibn Zeydoun Abu al Waleed Ahmad Ibn Zeydoun al Makhzumi (Cordoue 1003 Séville 14 avril 1071) connu sous le nom de d’Ibn Zeydoun (en arabe أبو الوليد أحمد بن زيدون المخزومي) un célèbre poète andalou, dont sa poésie est dominée par sa relation avec …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Ibn Zaydún — Ibn Zeydoun Abu al Waleed Ahmad Ibn Zeydoun al Makhzumi (Cordoue 1003 Séville 14 avril 1071) connu sous le nom de d’Ibn Zeydoun (en arabe أبو الوليد أحمد بن زيدون المخزومي) un célèbre poète andalou, dont sa poésie est dominée par sa relation avec …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Abbad III — Al Mutamid Ibn Abbad Abbad III, connu sous le nom de Abû al Qâsim Muhammad “Al Mu tamid” ben Abbad[1] (1040 1095), est le fils et successeur de Abbad II al Mu tadid. Biographie Il hérita de son père le talent poétique et le caractère impitoyable …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Abbad I. — Taifa Reich Sevilla unter Abu l Qasim (Abbad I.) (dunkelgrün), Abbad II. al Mu tadid (grün) und Muhammad al Mu tamid (hellgrün) Abbad I., geboren als Abu l Qasim Muhammad ibn Abbad al Lachami (arabisch ‏أبو القاسم محمد بن عباد اللخمي‎, DMG …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Ibn Zeydoun — Abu al Waleed Ahmad Ibn Zeydoun al Makhzumi (Cordoue 1003 Séville 14 avril 1071) connu sous le nom de d’Ibn Zeydoun (en arabe أبو الوليد أحمد بن زيدون المخزومي) un célèbre poète andalou, dont sa poésie est dominée par sa relation avec la poétesse …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Abbad — ► Nombre de varios gobernantes de al Ándalus. ► Abbad I (Abū al Qāsim Muhammad) (m. 1042) Cadí de Sevilla. Se declaró independiente y se hizo nombrar hajib del califa. ► Abbad II o Al Mu’tadid I (Abu’Amr ibn Muhammad) (m. 1069) Emir de Córdoba,… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Ibn Ammar — (c. 1031 ndash; c. 1086) was a Iberian Muslim poet from Silves (however Estômbar, at that time part of the Silves district, claims him as their own) who became prime minister of the taifa of Seville. Though he was poor and of no great reputation… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.