Limassol


Limassol
Limassol
Λεμεσός (Greek) Limasol/Leymosun (Turkish)

Seal
Limassol is located in Cyprus
Limassol
Coordinates: 34°40′N 33°02′E / 34.667°N 33.033°E / 34.667; 33.033
Country  Cyprus
District Limassol
Government
 – Mayor Andreas Christou
Population (2010)
 – Total 228,000
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
Website www.limassolmunicipal.com.cy

Limassol (Greek: Λεμεσός, Lemesós;, Turkish: Limasol/Leymosun) is the second-largest city in Cyprus, with a population of 228,000 (2008). It is the largest city in geographical size, and the biggest municipality on the island. The city is located on Akrotiri Bay, on the island's southern coast and it is the capital of Limassol District.

Limassol is the biggest Cypriot port in the Mediterranean transit trade. It has also become one of the most important tourism, trade and service-providing centres in the area. Limassol is renowned for its long cultural tradition, and is home to the Cyprus University of Technology. A wide spectrum of activities and a number of museums and archaeological sites are available to the interested visitor. Consequently, Limassol attracts a wide range of tourists mostly during an extended summer season to be accommodated in a wide range of hotels and apartments. A large marina is currently being constructed near the old town.

Limassol was built between two ancient cities, Amathus and Kourion, so during Byzantine rule it was known as Neapolis (new town). Limassol's tourist strip now runs east along the coast as far as Amathus. To the west of the city is the Akrotiri Sovereign Base Area, part of the British Overseas Territory of Akrotiri and Dhekelia.

Contents

History

Kourion theatre outside the city of Limassol.
Ancient Amathus
View of Kolossi Castle built in 1210 by the Frankish military.
Alternative view of Kolossi Castle

The town of Limassol is situated between the ancient towns of Amathus and Curium (Kourion). Limassol was probably built after Amathus had been ruined. However, the town of Limassol has been inhabited since very ancient times. Graves found there date back to 2000 BC and others date back to the 8th and 4th centuries BC. These few remains show that a small colonisation must have existed which did not manage to develop and flourish. Ancient writers mention nothing about the foundation of the town.

According to the Council of Chalcedon which took place in 451, the local bishop as well as the bishops of Amathus and Arsinoe were involved in the foundation of the city, which would be known by the names of Theodosiana and Neapolis.[1] Bishop Leontios of Neapolis was an important church writer in the 7th century. The records of the 7th Synod (787) refer to it as the bishop’s see. The town was known as Lemesos in the 10th century.

The history of Limassol is largely known by the events associated with the Third Crusade. The king of England, Richard the Lionheart, was travelling to the Holy Land in 1191.[2] His fiancée Berengaria and his sister Joan (Queen of Sicily), were also travelling on a different ship. Because of a storm, the ship with the queens arrived in Limassol.[2] Isaac Comnenus, the Byzantine governor of Cyprus, was heartless and cruel, and loathed the Latins. He invited the queens ashore, with the intention of holding them to ransom, but they wisely refused. So he refused them fresh water and they had to put out to sea again or yield to capture. When Richard arrived in Limassol and met Isaac Comnenus, he asked him to contribute to the crusade for the liberation of the Holy Land.[2] While at the beginning Isaac had accepted, he later on refused to give any help. Richard then chased him and finally arrested him; the entire island was therefore taken over by the Anglo-Normans, bringing the long Byzantine dominion of Cyprus to an end. Richard celebrated his marriage with Berengaria who had received the crown as queen of England in Cyprus. Richard destroyed Amathus and the inhabitants were transferred to Limassol.[2]

A year later, in AD 1192, Cyprus was sold for the sum of 100,000 bezants to the Templars, rich monks and soldiers whose aim was the protection of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem.[2] The knights enforced high taxes, in order to get back the money that had been given for the purchase of Cyprus. This led to the revolt of the Cypriots, who wished to get rid of the bond of the promise. Richard accepted their request and a new purchaser was found: Guy de Lusignan, a Roman Catholic from Poitou. Cyprus was therefore handed over to the French dynasty of the house of Lusignan, thus establishing the medieval Kingdom of Cyprus.

For a period of about three centuries 1192-1489, Limassol enjoyed remarkable prosperity. Cyprus was characterised by its great number of Latin bishops. This lasted until the occupation of Cyprus by the Ottomans in AD 1570. Latin battalions which established monasteries were settled down there. The settlement of merchants in Cyprus and particularly in Limassol in the 13th century led to the financial welfare of its inhabitants. Its harbour as a centre of transportation and commerce, contributed greatly to the financial and cultural development.

The War of the Lombards

Holy Roman Emperor, Frederick II, urged by the Templars of Cyprus who were enemies of Ibelen, arrived in Limassol and took over in the town in 1228. He then called John Ibelen to come before him, in order to discuss the plans against the Muslims. John Ibelen came before him accompanied by the under-aged King Eric and all the Templars of Cyprus. When Ibelen refused to cooperate, Frederick had no choice but to let him go. The German King took over in Limassol and in other towns. He appointed his own governors but he finally left Cyprus. The forces of Frederick were finally beaten in the battle of 1229, which took place in Agirta, a village in the Kyrenia area, between the forces of Frederick and the troops of the Franks, which were led by John Ibelen. After the end of the battle, Frederick made no further claims to the island.

Attacks from Egypt

Limassol was under attack from the Mamelukes of Egypt. The harbour of Limassol had become a refuge for the pirates who pillaged and plundered Muslim land in the Eastern Mediterranean . Thus, a military force arrived in Limassol in 1424, sent by the Mamelukes of Egypt. The Mamelukes devastated and burned Limassol. A year later, they invaded Cyprus again, this time with greater forces. They plundered Famagusta and Larnaca, and then arrived in Limassol where without any difficulty they occupied the Castle, burned many places, plundered others and then returned to Cairo. The Mamelukes caused even greater destruction in Limassol and other places in 1426. Janus, the king of Cyprus, was defeated by them in Chirokitia and was sent back to Cairo as a prisoner.

Cyprus was sold in AD 1489 to Venice by the Cypriot Queen Catherine Cornaro. The Venetians did not have Cyprus' best interest at heart, they were only interested in receiving the taxes and in exploiting the country’s resources. The Venetians destroyed the Castle of Limassol.

Ottoman Empire

The Ottoman Empire invaded Cyprus in 1570-1571 and occupied it. Limassol was conquered in July 1570 without any resistance. Descriptions of different visitors inform us that the town of Limassol looked like a village with a significant population. The Christians used to live in small houses with such low doorways, that one had to bend in order to enter. This was deliberate design in order to prevent the Ottomans from to entering the houses while riding a horse.

Some neighbourhoods, mostly to the east of the city were predominantly Greek, to the west predominantly Turkish with an evenly mixed area around the castle. The church played an important role in the education of Greeks during the years 1754-1821. During those years new schools were set up in all the towns. Greek intellectuals used to teach Greek history, Turkish and French. The following schools operated in the town of Limassol:

  • The Greek School which was established in 1819.
  • The first public school which was established in 1841.
  • The Girls’ School which was established in 1861.

British administration

Example of a typical street in the old town

The British took over in Cyprus in 1878. The first British governor of Limassol was Colonel Warren.[3] He showed a particular interest in Limassol and even from the very first days the condition of the town showed an improvement. The roads were cleaned, the animals were removed from the centre, roads were fixed, trees were planted and docks were constructed for the loading and unloading of those ships that were anchored off-shore. Lanterns for the lighting of the central areas were also installed in the 1880. In 1912, electricity replaced the old lanterns.[3]

From the very first years of the British occupation, a post office, a telegraph office and a hospital began to operate.[3] In 1880 the first printing press started working. It was in this printing press that the newspapers «Alithia» and «Anagennisis» were published in 1897. The newspaper «Salpinx» was published at the same time.

At the end of the 19th century the very first hotels began to operate. Among these were «Europe» and «Amathus».

These changes that the British brought about contributed to the development of an intellectual and artistic life. Schools, theaters, clubs, art galleries, music halls, sport societies, football clubs etc. were all set up and meant a great deal to the cultural life of Limassol.

Government

Limassol City hall

The first marxist groups in Cyprus formed in Limassol in the early 1920s; in 1926, the Communist party of Cyprus was formed in the city. Its successor, AKEL, has dominated municipal elections, since the first free elections in 1943, won by Ploutis Servas.

Andreas Christou, an AKEL member, was elected mayor of Limassol in December 2006 to serve a five-year term.

Education

There are over a hundred educational institutions in the city. Limassol hosts Saint Mary's school, a Catholic private school open to all religions and races, as well as other private schools.

In addition to the various Greek-speaking Elementary schools, Limassol is home to the Limassol Nareg Armenian school.

Climate

View of the promenade.
Beach Appearance in March.

Limassol has a Mediterranean climate with hot and dry summers and cool rainy winters,which are separated by short springs and autumns which are mild and pleasant. From December to March the weather is unsettled and usually rainy and windy but you can also often expect great amounts of sunshine averaging around 5 hours a day. During this season there are a few days when the daytime highs might not exceed 12 °C (54 °F) and the night time lows might be as low as 2 °C (36 °F) but usually the temperature ranges from 16 °C (61 °F) to 20 °C (68 °F) in the day and from 7 °C (45 °F) to 10 °C (50 °F) in the night. Rain tends to be heavy this time of the year and thunderstorms occur often though they usually do not last for a long time. Snow in Limassol is very rare and usually falls mixed with rain every 7–13 years. In recent years, snow mixed with rain fell in February 2004 and in January 2008. In spring, which lasts from late March–May the weather is mild to warm and pleasant. It is sunny almost every day and the temperatures are around 25 °C (77 °F) in the day and 15 °C (59 °F) in the night. Expect a few rain showers and thunderstorms especially in late March and April. Sometimes during the spring dust comes from the Sahara desert which affects badly the visibility of the city. Summer for Limassol is the longest season of the year that begins in late May and finishes in early October. At this time of the year the weather is sunny every day and rain is rare. The temperatures are between 19 °C (66 °F) to30 °C (86 °F) in June and September and 22 °C (72 °F) to 33 °C (91 °F) in July and August. Sometimes during heatwaves the temperatures go up to 36 °C (97 °F) in the day and might not fall below 26 °C (79 °F) in the night. In June fog can sometimes occur usually resolves early in the mornings. Autumn is warm and usually sunny. It begins in mid-October and ends in late November. During this period of the year expect temperatures from as low as 12 °C (54 °F) and as high as 29 °C (84 °F). This season the weather differs from year to year and it can be very wet with violent thunderstorms sometimes(October 2009; rainfall of around 90 mm (3.5 in)) or very dry (October 2007; rainfall of 2-5mm). Finally Limassol receives around 410 mm (16.1 in) of rain each year but this varies from year to year and sometimes droughts do occur(every 3–5 years). The rainy season 2009-2010 was a wet one with precipitation being as high as 515 mm (20.3 in) in some areas whilst the rainy season of 2007-2008 was dry with only 300 mm (11.8 in) of rain. Hail is rare and usually falls between October–April.

Climate data for Limassol
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 17.6
(63.7)
17.8
(64.0)
20.0
(68.0)
22.9
(73.2)
26.9
(80.4)
30.8
(87.4)
33.2
(91.8)
33.3
(91.9)
31.3
(88.3)
28.6
(83.5)
23.5
(74.3)
18.9
(66.0)
25.4
Daily mean °C (°F) 13.2
(55.8)
13.1
(55.6)
15.2
(59.4)
18.0
(64.4)
21.8
(71.2)
25.5
(77.9)
27.8
(82.0)
28.0
(82.4)
26.0
(78.8)
23.2
(73.8)
18.5
(65.3)
14.5
(58.1)
20.4
Average low °C (°F) 8.8
(47.8)
8.5
(47.3)
10.4
(50.7)
13.1
(55.6)
16.7
(62.1)
20.1
(68.2)
22.4
(72.3)
22.7
(72.9)
20.6
(69.1)
17.7
(63.9)
13.5
(56.3)
10.1
(50.2)
15.4
Precipitation mm (inches) 86.7
(3.413)
66.9
(2.634)
35.8
(1.409)
18.4
(0.724)
05.1
(0.201)
01.4
(0.055)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
02.9
(0.114)
13.1
(0.516)
77.5
(3.051)
99.7
(3.925)
407.5
(16.043)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 1 mm) 9.3 7.1 5.6 3.3 1.1 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.3 1.9 5.5 8.8 43.1
Source: Meteorological Service (Cyprus)[4]

Economy

Avenue of the city.

The development of tourism in Limassol began after 1974 when the Turkish invaders occupied Famagusta and Kyrenia, the principal tourist resorts of Cyprus. Limassol has a lot of beaches, suitable for sunbathing and swimming. A bathing beach with all the necessary facilities, provided by the «Cyprus Tourism Organisation» (CTO), is operating in the town of Limassol, in «Dasoudi» area.

Limassol became the major sea port of the Republic of Cyprus in 1974. Before 1974, that role had been filled by Famagusta which is now located in the Turkish controlled part of the island which is not recognised as a legal port by any country except Turkey.

Cranes in Limassol Harbour.

Limassol is the base for many of the island's wine companies, serving the wine-growing regions on the southern slopes of the Troodos Mountains (of which the most famous is Commandaria). The most important ones are KEO, LOEL, SODAP and ETKO. The wines and cognacs (brandies) that are produced by the grapes that grow in the countryside, are of excellent quality. They have won several awards in international exhibitions. There is a considerable consumption of wine products in Cyprus by the locals and the foreign visitors. Big quantities are exported to Europe.

The town of Limassol is the biggest industrial centre of the province. There are about 350 industrial units with 90 industry wares. These industries concern dressmaking, furniture, shoes, drinks, food, prints, metal industry, electric devices, plastic wares as well as many other different industries.

Columbia Plaza in the city centre, offering a new choice for dining out

Limassol is an important trade centre of Cyprus. This is due to the presence of the UK sovereign base at Episkopi and Akrotiri, and to the displacement of the population in Limassol after the Turkish invasion in 1974. The trade markets are gathered in the center of the town and in the tourist area along the coast that begins from the old harbour and ends in Amathus area. Most of the hotels, restaurants, confectioneries, discos and places of entertainment in general, are to be found in this area.

Limassol has two Ports, commonly referred to as the "old port" and the "new port". The new port has the greatest commercial and passenger flow of traffic and it is the biggest port in the free part of Cyprus. The old harbour has a breakwater 250 metres long and it is only able to receive three small ships at a time. It is thus normally used by fishing boats. The new harbour is eleven metres deep and has break-waters that are 1300 metres long. It is able to receive about ten ships depending on their size. Exports of grapes, wines, carobs, citrus fruits and imports of cereals, vehicles, machines, textiles, agricultural medicines, fertilizers, iron etc. are exported and imported through these ports.

Limassol is today the largest ship management service centre in Europe with more than 60 shipmanagement companies located in the city, as due to the Cyprus Shipping tax system (a choice between corporation tax or a tonnage tax system)it makes it very attractive for ship management companies to have their main offices in Limassol. Thus the very popular MARITIME CYPRUS shipping conference which takes place every 2 years, attracting all the largest shipping companies of the world. These shipmanagement companies currently employee more than 40.000 seafarers. In fact, the Cyprus registry today is ranked as the tenth among international fleets.

Seaside Municipal Gardens

Limassol has begun work on a project to build a new marina located to the west of Limassol Castle, between the old and new ports. This new development will allow berthing of ocean-going yachts and construction is expected to be completed by 2011 with the marina having a capacity of 1.000 vessels.

During the last years, Limassol has experienced a construction boom fueled by the tourist sector as well as from increasing foreign investments in the city. This development covers expensive housing, including the first twin highrise Towers, Olympic Residence. Public projects like the redesigning of the city's 1 kilometer promenade, are improving the quality of life of the people and the image of the city as a cosmopolitan destination. Infrastructure improvements partly funded by European programs have helped solve traffic problems that the city faced with the construction of new highway flyovers and roundabouts.

Demographics

A Church in Pelendri

Internal migration since the 1960s and influx of displaced persons after 1974 significantly increased the population of Limassol and its suburbs. Greater Limassol today includes the municipality of Limassol (includes the suburb of Agia Fyla) and the municipalities of Polemidia, Mesa Geitonia, Agios Athanasios and Germasogeia.

Limassol traditionally had a mixed population of Greek and Turkish Cypriots. The majority of Turkish Cypriots moved to the north in 1974. Accordingly, many Greek Cypriots from the north of Cyprus, who became refugees following the Turkish invasion, settled down in Limassol. During the 1990s several Cypriot Roma (people) (considered Turkish Cypriots according to the constitution) returned from the North of the island to the Turkish quarter of Limassol.

The rise of the population birth rate during the late 19th and 20th centuries (1878–1960) was 70%. The number of inhabitants was 6.131 in 1881, while in 1960 the number had risen to 43.593. The number of the Greek population was estimated at 37.478, while the Turkish population at 6.115.

Landmarks

View from the coastal front.
The medieval (Byzantine) castle.
  • The Archaeological Museum provides a very interesting collection of antiquities found in the district of Limassol, dating from the Neolithic Age to the Roman period. Some of the archaeological discoveries are: Stone axes of the Neolithic and Chalcolithic period, potteries and objects of the ancient cities of Curium and Amathus, as well as Roman terracottas, gold jewellery, coins, sculptures, columns, vases, earrings, rings, necklaces, marble statues etc.
  • The Folk Art Museum is beautifully preserved old house which provides a very interesting collection of Cypriot Folk Art of the last two centuries. Some of the most fascinating objects of the collection are: national costumes, tapestry, embroidery, wooden chests, waistcoats, men’s jackets, necklaces, a variety of light clothes, town costumes, country tools etc. The museum was established in 1985. More than 500 exhibits are housed in its six rooms. The museum was awarded the Europa Nostra prize in 1989. Here, the visitor can study Cypriot culture through the hand-made exhibits.
  • Public Garden is situated on the coastal road. It provides a great variety of vegetation: eucalyptus trees, pine trees and cypresses. In this beautiful environment the citizens of Limassol and many visitors can walk around and enjoy themselves. Inside the garden, there is a small zoo. There, the visitor can see deer, moufflons, ostriches, pheasants, tigers, lions, monkeys, vultures, pelicans and other animals and different kinds of birds.Not far from the zoo there is the small natural history museum and the garden theatre that is reconstructed to host famous international groups.
  • A series of public sculptures commissioned by the Limassol Municipality, can be found on the reclamation (now Twin Cities park), spanning one mile (1.6 km) of Seafront reclaimed land. The sculptues were created by Costas Dikefalos, Thodoros Papayiannis, Yiorgos Tsaras, Vassilis Vassili, Christos Riganas, Kyriakos Rokos, Manolis Tsombanakis and Yiorgos Houliaras from Greece, Kyriakos Kallis, Nikos Kouroussis, Helene Black and Maria Kyprianou from Cyprus, Saadia Bahat from Israel, Victor Bonato from Germany and Ahmet El-Stoahy from Egypt.
  • Towers of Limassol BBC Relay, a powerful mediumwave transmitter.
Limassol panorama by night.
Tourist area of Limassol with Hotels and Resorts

Festivals

Limassol is famous in Cyprus for its festivals, like the Carnival and Wine Festival.[5] The Limassol Carnival festival lasts for ten (10) days, with jolly and amusing masquerading. This custom is very old, going back to pagan rituals.[5] With the passage of time it has acquired a different, purely entertaining character, with a large, popular following. The festival starts with the entrance parade of the King Carnival, followed by a fancy-dress competition for children. During the Carnival parade in the main streets, large crowds from all over the island gather to watch the floats with the serenade and other masqueraded groups. Many fancy-dress balls and parties take place at many hotels every night.

Scene from the Carnival of Limassol.

During the first quarter of September, the great Wine Festival of Cyprus takes place in the Limassol Municipal Garden, every evening between 8.00 hrs - 23.00 hrs.[5] During the festival the visitor has the chance to taste some of the best Cyprus wines, which are offered free of charge. On some evenings, various groups from Cyprus and abroad perform folk dancing and there are also choirs and others.

Other festivals are Yermasogeia Flower Festival (May), Festival of the Flood (June), Shakespearean nights and Festival of Ancient Greek Drama.[5]

Furthermore, the city of Limassol introduced the first Beer festival in July 2003. This is a three day dance festival by the sea in the heart of the city centre. Visitors can enjoy a variety of Cypriot beers and imported beers such as KEO, Heineken, Amstel and Becks. The entrance to the festival is free of charge and beers are sold at low prices, complemented by a mix of international music. [6]

The sixth Junior Eurovision Song Contest was held in Limassol, in the Spyros Kyprianou Athletic Centre.

Sports

Limassol Marathon logo.

AEL FC and Apollon Limassol are the two major sport clubs in Limassol, which have football, basketball and volleyball teams. In basketball, Apollon and AEL are very powerful teams). In football, both teams Apollon and AEL play in First Division. Aris Limassol is another football team which plays in First Division and like AEL is one of the founding teams of the Cyprus Football Association (KOP). AEL women volleyball teams is the permanent champion of Cyprus. There are also teams in athletics, bowling, cycling and other sports.

The football stadium of Limassol is Tsirion, with capacity of 16 000, which hosts the three football teams of Limassol and in the past it hosted Cyprus national football team. It was used also for athletics. There are various other stadiums for other sports in Limassol. The Apollon Limassol basketball stadium, hosted the 2003 FIBA Europe South Regional Challenge Cup Final Four. The two basketball teams of Limassol participated and AEL became the first Cypriot sport team to win a European Trophy. In 2006, Limassol hosted the FIBA Europe All Star Game in Spyros Kiprianou Sports Centre, as it had the year before.

Also, in the Limassol district the Cyprus Rally was hosted for World Rally Championship and currently is organizing the Intercontinental Rally Challenge.

Limassol also has an independent civilian Rugby Union team, the Limassol Crusaders, who play at the AEK Achileas Stadium and participate in the Joint Services Rugby League.There is a professional handball team, APEN Agiou Athanasiou. An annual marathon event takes place each year in Limassol the Limassol International Marathon GSO.

Rowing and canoeing are rapidly becoming very popular in Limassol, due to the 3 Nautical clubs in the city of Limassol. The Germasoyia damn is the place for both practising and competitions.

International relations

Twin towns — Sister cities

Limassol is twinned with:

Notable residents

Michalis Kakoyiannis, director

Public Transport

Public transport in Limassol is currently served only by buses. Bus routes and timetables for buses in Limassol can be found at Limassol Buses

See also

References

  1. ^ The acts of the Council of Chalcedon by Council of Chalcedon, Richard Price, Michael Gaddis 2006 ISBN 0853230390 [1]
  2. ^ a b c d e Cypnet.co.uk (2011 [last update]). "Cyprus History: Cyprus under Richard I - cypnet.co.uk". cypnet.co.uk. http://www.cypnet.co.uk/ncyprus/history/17.htm. Retrieved 5 July 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c Daedalus Informatics (2006 [last update]). "The History of Cyprus - The British occupation". daedalus.gr. http://www.daedalus.gr/prdinformatics/HOC/britishoccupationofcyprusAEn.htm. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  4. ^ "Meteorological Service - Climatological and Meteorological Reports". http://www.moa.gov.cy/moa/MS/MS.nsf/DMLclimet_reports_en/DMLclimet_reports_en?OpenDocument&Start=1&Count=1000&Expand=1. 
  5. ^ a b c d CyprusEvents.net (2011 [last update]). "Limassol events". cyprusevents.net. http://www.cyprusevents.net/annual/limassol-events. Retrieved 5 July 2011. 
  6. ^ Festivals in Limassol
  7. ^ e-Patras.gr (2011 [last update]). "e-patras.gr - Διεθνείς Σχέσεις" (in Greek). e-patras.gr. http://www.e-patras.gr/portal/web/pressoffice/367. Retrieved 5 July 2011. 
  8. ^ "Twinning Cities". City of Thessaloniki. http://www.thessalonikicity.gr/English/twinning-cities.htm. Retrieved 2009-07-07. 
  9. ^ "Twin City acitivities". Haifa Municipality. Archived from the original on 2008-06-21. http://web.archive.org/web/20080621013813/http://www.haifa.muni.il/Cultures/en-US/city/CitySecretary_ForeignAffairs/EngActs.htm. Retrieved 2008-11-20. 
  10. ^ Evripidou, Stefanos (2009-06-25). "Cyprus flag designer dies". Cyprus Mail. http://www.cyprus-mail.com/news/main.php?id=46404&cat_id=1. Retrieved 2009-07-11. [dead link]

External links

Coordinates: 34°40′N 33°02′E / 34.667°N 33.033°E / 34.667; 33.033


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