Off break


Off break
Bowling techniques
Deliveries
Historical Styles

This box: view · talk · edit

Off break is a type of delivery in the sport of cricket. It is the attacking delivery of an off spin bowler. Off breaks are known as off spinners.

An off break is bowled by holding the cricket ball in the palm of the hand with the seam running across under all the fingers. As the ball is released, the fingers roll down the right side of the ball (for a right-handed bowler), giving the ball a clockwise spin as seen from behind. When the ball bounces on the pitch, the spin causes it to deviate towards the right from the bowler's perspective, this is to the left from the batsman's point of view or towards the leg side of a right-handed batsman. The ball spins away from the off side.

An off spin bowler will bowl mostly off breaks, varying them by adjusting the line and length of the deliveries. Off breaks are considered to be one of the easier spin deliveries for a right-handed batsman to play. This is because the ball moves in towards the batsman's body, meaning the batsman's legs are usually in the path of the ball if it misses the bat or takes an edge. This makes it difficult for the bowler to get the batsman out bowled or caught from an off break, but it does mean there is a chance of leg before wicket, assuming the ball has not turned enough to miss the leg stump.

A left-handed batsman has more difficulty facing off break bowling, because the ball moves away from his body. This means that any miscalculation can more easily result in an outside edge off the bat and a catch going to the wicket-keeper or slips fielders. A ball bowled by a left-arm orthodox spin bowler with an off break action spins in the opposite direction. Such a ball is not normally called an off break, but a left-arm orthodox spinner.

Famous Off-spin bowlers include Saqlain Mushtaq, Muttiah Muralitharan, Graeme Swann and Harbhajan Singh.

See also

An off break or off spin delivery.

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • off break — noun (cricket) A ball that breaks from the offside towards the legside on pitching • • • Main Entry: ↑off * * * off break, Cricket. a ball that travels away from a line between the bowler and batsman but breaks back toward the batsman upon… …   Useful english dictionary

  • off break — noun a normal ball bowled by a off spin bowler, moving from off to leg (for a right handed batsman) …   Wiktionary

  • off break — noun Cricket a ball which spins from the off side towards the leg side after pitching …   English new terms dictionary

  • off break — /ˈɒf breɪk/ (say of brayk) noun (in cricket) a ball which, when a right hander is facing, changes direction from off towards leg when it pitches …   Australian English dictionary

  • off-break — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Off cutter — grip Bowling techniques Bowling strategy Fast bowling Seam bowling Swing bowling Medium pace bowling Spin bowling Finger spin Off spin Left arm orthod …   Wikipedia

  • break — ► VERB (past broke; past part. broken) 1) separate into pieces as a result of a blow, shock, or strain. 2) make or become inoperative; stop working. 3) interrupt (a continuity, sequence, or course). 4) fail to observe (a law, regulation, or… …   English terms dictionary

  • off-spin|ner — «AWF SPIHN uhr, OF », noun. Cricket. 1. = off break. (Cf. ↑off break) 2. a bowler who specializes in off breaks …   Useful english dictionary

  • off spin — noun (cricket) Spin imparted to a ball to cause an off break • • • Main Entry: ↑off …   Useful english dictionary

  • break — break1 W1S1 [breık] v past tense broke [brəuk US brouk] past participle broken [ˈbrəukən US ˈbrou ] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(separate into pieces)¦ 2¦(bones)¦ 3¦(machines)¦ 4¦(rules/laws)¦ 5¦(promise/agreement)¦ 6¦(stop/rest)¦ 7¦(end something)¦ …   Dictionary of contemporary English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.