Franz Georg von Schönborn-Buchheim


Franz Georg von Schönborn-Buchheim

Franz Georg von Schönborn-Buchheim (15 June 1682 - 18 January 1756) was the Archbishop of Trier from 1729 until 1756, and the Bishop of Worms and Provost of Ellwangen from 1732 until 1756.

Biography

Franz Georg was the ninth son of the Count of Schönborn-Buchheim and the nephew of Lothar Franz von Schönborn, the Archbishop of Mainz. Franz Georg's brothers were Johann Philipp Franz, Friedrich Karl and Hugo Damian, all three important churchmen. Beginning in 1702 he studied law, philosophy, theology, geography, history, and language at Salzburg, Siena, and Leiden. After completing his studies he travelled to the Vatican, Spain and England. Through the influence of his uncle, Franz Georg gained valuable contacts in the court of the Holy Roman Emperor in Vienna. After his uncle died in 1729 and Franz Ludwig, Archbishop of Trier succeeded him vacating his own see, Franz Georg was unanimously elected the new Archbishop of Trier. Owing to the protection of the Papacy in 1732 he was also elected the Bishop of Worms and the Provost of Ellwangen.

Politically Franz Georg sided with the House of Habsburg, and through it the Archbishopric of Trier became involved in the great conflicts of the day. In the second half of his reign, Franz Georg retired from active involvement in politics, and focused on administration and construction projects. From 1737 until 1753 he constructed a Baroque residence in Ellwangen. Beginning in 1739 he began the extension of the Philippsburg of Ehrenbreitstein in Coblenz. He also constructed a new summer residence. Despite being pious, Franz Georg worked hard to increase the level of education amongst the populace. He outlawed several pilgrimages, holidays and exorcisms. Towards the end of his life Franz Georg's power declined with that of his families. He died in Philippsburg in 1756 and was buried in the Cathedral of Trier.




Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Franz Georg von Schönborn-Buchheim — Franz Georg von Schönborn (um 1740) Kurfürstliches Wappen von Schönborns …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Franz Georg von Schönborn — (um 1740) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Friedrich Karl von Schönborn-Buchheim — Fürstbischof F. K. von Schönborn Buchheim (zeitgenössisches Gemälde) Friedrich Karl Reichsgraf (bis 1701: Reichsfreiherr) von Schönborn Buchheim (* 3. März 1674 in Mainz; † 26. Juli 1746 in Würzburg) war Fürstbischof von Würzburg und Bamberg und …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Damian Hugo Philipp von Schönborn-Buchheim — Porträt des Kardinals …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Melchior Friedrich Graf von Schönborn-Buchheim — (* 16. März 1644 in Groß Steinheim bei Hanau; † 19. Mai 1717 in Frankfurt am Main) war ein einflussreicher Adliger mit besten Verbindungen u. a. zum Kaiserhof zu Wien. Nach seinem Tod wurden drei seiner Söhne deutsche Fürstbischöfe.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Franz Ludwig von Pfalz-Neuburg — Wappen über dem Eingangsportal zum Schloss des Deutschen Ordens in Absberg Franz Ludwig von Pfalz Neuburg (* 18. Juli …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Franz Ludwig von der Pfalz-Neuburg — Franz Ludwig von Pfalz Neuburg Wappen über dem Eingangsportal zum Schloss des Deutschen Ordens in Absberg Franz Ludwig von Pfalz Neuburg (* 18. Juli …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Franz Ludwig von der Pfalz — Franz Ludwig von Pfalz Neuburg, zeitgenössisches Gemälde …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Schönborn-Buchheim — ist der Name folgender Personen: Damian Hugo Philipp von Schönborn Buchheim (1676–1743) Franz Georg von Schönborn Buchheim (1682–1756) Friedrich Karl von Schönborn Buchheim (1674–1746) Melchior Friedrich Graf von Schönborn Buchheim (1644–1717) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Friedrich Carl von Schönborn — Datei:Friedrich C v Schönborn.jpg Fürstbischof F. K. von Schönborn Buchheim (zeitgenössisches Gemälde) Friedrich Karl Reichsfreiherr (seit 1701 Reichsgraf) von Schönborn Buchheim (* 3. März 1674 in Mainz; † 26. Juli 1746 in Würzburg) war… …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.