Places that have decriminalized non-medical marijuana in the United States


Places that have decriminalized non-medical marijuana in the United States

Multiple places have decriminalized non-medical marijuana in the United States; however, marijuana is illegal under federal law. Gonzales v. Raich (2005) ruled in a 6-3 decision that the Commerce Clause the United States Constitution allowed the federal government to ban the use of marijuana, including medical use even if local laws allow it. Most places that have decriminalized marijuana (also known as cannabis) have civil fines, drug education, or drug treatment in place of incarceration and/or criminal charges for possession of small amounts of marijuana, or have made various marijuana offenses the lowest priority for law enforcement.
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legend|gray|No federal or state level decriminalization of non-medical marijuana

Alaska

In 1975, Alaska removed all penalties for possession of marijuana under 28.45 grams (one ounce) in one's residence or home. Sale of less than 28.45 grams is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to a year in jail and up to a $5,000 fine;cite web|url= http://norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4522|publisher=NORML|title=State by State Laws: Alaska|date=2006|accessdate=2006-12-24] at the time, in most states sale of less than 28.45 grams was a felony offence.

With the 1975 "Ravin v. State" decision, the Alaska Supreme Court declared the state's anti-drug law unconstitutional with respect to possession of small amounts of marijuana, holding that the right to privacy guaranteed by the Alaska state constitution outweighed the state's interest in banning the drug.cite web|url=http://www.druglibrary.org/Schaffer/legal/l1970/ravin.htm|author=Supreme Court of Alaska|publisher= [http://druglibrary.org/schaffer Schaffer Library of Drug Policy] |title=Ravin v. State, 537 P.2d 494 (Alaska 1975)|date=1975-05-28|accessdate=2006-12-20] Despite a 1990 initiative statute and a 2006 legislative statute contradicting the "Ravin" decision, Alaska courts continue to follow "Ravin", voiding laws which criminalize possession of small amounts of cannabis.cite web|url=http://www.druglibrary.org/olsen/war/ketchika.html|author=Supreme Court of Alaska|publisher= [http://www.druglibrary.org/olsen Carl E. Olsen's Marijuana Archive] |title=Alaska v. McNeil|date=1993-10-29|accessdate=2006-11-07] cite news|title=Alaska Recriminalizes Marijuana Possession|url=http://www.officer.com/article/article.jsp?siteSection=6&id=30812|publisher=Associated Press/ [http://www.officer.com/ Officer.com] |date=2006-06-05|author=Sutton, Anne|accessdate=2006-11-07] cite news|title=Judge Rules Against Alaska Marijuana Law|publisher=Associated Press/The Seattle Times|date=2006-07-11|author=Volz, Matt|url=http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2003118645_webpot10.html|accessdate=2006-11-07] This allows possession of fewer than 25 plants in one's residence or home.

Arkansas

Marijuana is not decriminalized on a statewide basis.

On November 7 2006, Eureka Springs, Arkansas passed "Cannabis as Low Police Priority" Initiative by 62-38 percent. The ordinance directs local law enforcement to issue a summons in lieu of a criminal arrest for adults age 18 and over to be found in possession of up to 28.45 grams (one ounce) of marijuana and/or marijuana paraphernalia. [cite news|url=http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=7084|title=2006 Mid-Term Election Results Offer Mixed Bag For Marijuana Law Reform|publisher=NORML|date=2006-11-08|accessdate=2007-06-06] Marijuana offences will be punished by a fine, community service, or drug counseling and education, but will not be punishable by arrest.cite web|url= http://www.drugsense.org/pages/initiatives/arkansas/eureka.htm|publisher= [http://drugsense.org / Drug Sense] |title=Eureka Springs, AR “Cannabis as Low Police Priority Initiative|date=2006|accessdate=2006-12-24]

California

On January 11975, Senate Bill 95cite web|url= http://www.norml.org/pdf_files/NORML_Rethinking_Decriminalizing_Marijuana.pdf|author=James Austin, Ph.D.|publisher=NORML|title=Rethinking the Consequences of Decriminalizing Marijuana|date=2005-11-02|accessdate=2006-12-24] made possession under 28.45 grams (one ounce) of marijuana for non-medical use punishable by a $100 fine; stricter punishments exist for amounts exceeding 28.45 grams, possession on school grounds, or subsequent violations or for sale or cultivation. If the offender is under the age of 21, his or her driver's license may be suspended for up to one year.cite web|url=http://www.norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4525|publisher=NORML|title=State by State Laws: California|date=2006|accessdate=2007-01-10]

On November 7 2000, Proposition 36 was passed by 61-39 percent. The proposition allowed first and second time non-violent simple drug possession offenders the option to receive drug treatment and legal probation instead of incarceration. [cite web|url=http://www.prop36.org/about.html|title=About Prop 36|publisher= [http://www.prop36.org/ Prop36.org] |accessdate=2007-03-22]

In April 1973, Berkeley passed The Marijuana Ordinace I (BMI I), which forbid law enforcement from arresting persons for marijuana related crimes unless cleared by the City Council. In the case Younger v. Berkeley City Council, an Alameda County Superior Court Judge Lionel Wilson struck down BMI I because it violates city code that states the City Manager has discretion over police personnel.cite news|author=Suzanne La Barre|title=Legal Limbo for Pot Users?|url=http://www.berkeleydaily.org/article.cfm?archiveDate=03-31-06&storyID=23788|publisher=Berkeley Daily Planet|date=2006-03-31|accessdate=2007-02-22]

In 1979, Berkeley passed The Marijuana Ordiance II (BMI II), which made the enforcement of marijuana laws—including cultivation, sale, and transport—the lowest priority for law enforcement, banned the expenditure of funds for enforcement of marijuana statutes, allowed residents to grow marijuana and report any theft of marijuana plants to law enforcement, and directed the City Council to lobby in favor of the decriminalization and legalization of marijuana.cite web|url=http://www.canorml.org/laws/berkeleycannabisordinance.html|title=The Berkeley Cannabis Ordinance|publisher= [http://www.canorml.org/California NORML] |accessdate=2007-01-12] cite web|url=http://www.ci.berkeley.ca.us/bmc/berkeley%5Fmunicipal%5Fcode/title%5F12/24/index.html|title=Marijuana Policy|publisher=The City of Berkeley|accessdate=2007-01-12]

In 2000, Mendocino County became the first county in the United States to repeal any type of punishment for non-medical personal use of marijuana when Measure G passed, by a vote of 58-42 percent. The Green Party-sponsored Measure Gcite web|url=http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/10/30/MN8016.DTL|title=Mendocino Votes on Growth Industry Though largely symbolic, Measure G would `legalize' small marijuana farms|publisher= [http://www.sfgate.com/ San Francisco Chronicle] |accessdate=2007-01-12] provides protection from law enforcement for persons possessing no more than 25 adult female flowing marijuana plants or the equivalent in dried marijuana.cite web|url=http://www.canorml.org/news/mendoinit.html|title=Marijuana Ordinance for Medocino County|publisher= [http://www.canorml.org/ California NORML] |accessdate=2006-12-24] This measure was however repealed in 2008 by Measure B by 52-48% cite web|url= http://yesonb.blogspot.com/|publisher= [http://yesonb.blogspot.com/] |title=Measure B: Marijuana Law Enforcement - Mendocino County, CA|accessdate=2008-08-31]

On November 3 2004, Oakland passed Proposition Z, by a vote of 65-35 percent. Proposition Z made personal adult use, distribution, sale, cultivation, and possession of non-medical marijuana, the lowest priority for law enforcement. Proposition Z will allow the licensing, taxing, and regulation of marijuana sales if California law is amended to allow so. The proposition states the city of Oakland must advocate to the state of California to adopt laws to regulate and tax marijuana.cite web|url= http://www.smartvoter.org/2004/11/02/ca/alm/meas/Z/|publisher= [http://www.smartvoter.org/ Smart Voter] |title=Meeasure Z: Marijuana Law Enforcement - Alameda County, CA|accessdate=2006-12-24]

On November 7 2006, Santa Barbara, passed Measure P, by a vote of 66-34 percent. Measure P made non-medical marijuana offenses the lowest priority for law enforcement; this does not apply to the cultivation, distribution, sale, public use, or driving under the influence. cite web|url=http://www.smartvoter.org/2006/11/07/ca/sba/meas/|publisher= [http://www.smartvoter.org/ Smart Voter] |title=Directory of Santa Barbara County, CA Measures|accessdate=2006-12-24]

On November 7 2006, Santa Cruz passed Measure K, by a vote of 64-36 percent. Measure K made adult non-medical marijuana offenses the lowest priority for law enforcement; this does not apply to cultivation, distribution, sale in public, sale to minors, or driving under the influence.cite web|url=http://www.smartvoter.org/2006/11/07/ca/sba/meas/|publisher= [http://www.smartvoter.org/ Smart Voter] |title=Measure K: Marijuana Law Enforcement Priority - Santa Cruz County, CA|accessdate=2006-12-24] cite web|url=http://www.santacruzpl.org/ref/measures/textfiles/2005_2009/2006november/measurek.shtml|title=Measure K: text of measure - Santa Cruz, CA|accessdate=2008-10-03] The measure requests the Santa Cruz city clerk send letters annually to state and federal representatives advocating reform of marijuana laws. [cite web|url=http://www.sensiblesantacruz.org/initiative.htm|title=Measure K - Lowest Law Enforcement Priority Initiative: FAQ|publisher= [http://www.sensiblesantacruz.org/ Santa Cruz Ciitizens or Sensible Marijuana Policy] |accessdate=2007-06-11]

In 2006, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors passed a marijuana ordinance, by a vote of 8-3. This ordinance made adult marijuana offenses the lowest priority for law enforcement; this does not apply to the sale in a public place or driving under the influence. The ordinance states that the San Francisco government will urge state and federal authorities to enact similar laws. cite web|url=http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/462/san_francisco_passes_lowest_priority_marijuana_initiative|publisher= [http://www.stopthedrugwar.com/ StopTheDrugWar.com (DRCNet)] |title=Marijuana: San Francisco Supervisors Approve Lowest Law Enforcement Priority Policy|accessdate=2006-12-24]

On November 7 2006, Santa Monica passed Measure Y, by a vote of 65-35 percent. Measure Y made marijuana offenses the lowest priority for law enforcement. The measure states the city clerk of Santa Monica will encourage state and federal authorities to adopt similar laws.cite web|url=http://www.smartvoter.org/2006/11/07/ca/la/meas/Y|publisher= [http://www.smartvoter.org/Smart Voter] |title=Measure Y: Lowest Enforcement Priority for Adult, Personal Use of Marijuana - Los Angeles County, CA|accessdate=2006-12-24]

In 2006, West Hollywood City Council passed a marijuana resolution, by a vote of 4-0, which made West Hollywood the first city in Southern California to adopt a lowest law enforcement priority law for marijuana offenses. The resolution stated “it is not the policy of the City or its law enforcement agency to target possession of small amounts of marijuana and the consumption of non-medical marijuana in private by adults." [cite web|url=http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle-old/441/westhollywood.shtml|title=Marijuana: West Hollywood Passes "Lowest Priority" Resolution|publisher= [http://www.stopthedrugwar.com/ StopTheDrugWar.com (DRCNet)] |accessdate=2006-12-24] cite web|publisher=City of West Hollywood|title=Council Considers Formal Position Regarding Marijuana Consumption and Possession|date=2006-06-16|url=http://www.weho.org/news/index.cfm/fuseaction/story/ID/1378/|accessdate=2006-09-06] [cite web|title=City Council, City of West Hollywood, Minutes, Monday, June 19, 2006|url=http://www.weho.org/download/index.cfm/fuseaction/download/cid/4461/|accessdate=2006-09-06]

Colorado

In 1975, Colorado made possession under an 28.45 grams (one ounce) of marijuana a petty offense punishable by a $100 fine; stricter punishments exist for possession over 28.45 grams, sale, cultivation, or use or display in public.cite web|url=http://norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4526|author=James Austin, Ph.D.|publisher=NORML|title=State by Sate Laws: Colorado|date=2005-11-02|accessdate=2006-12-30]

On November 1 2006, Denver passed the Denver Alcohol-Marijuana Equalization Initiative, by a vote of 54-46 percent. This initiative repealed municipal penalties for possession of 28.45 grams (one ounce) of marijuana, but only for persons age 21 and older. However, this conflicts with state law, so police can still arrest for possession of marijuana because Colorado state and federal penalties remain in effect.cite web|publisher=USA Today|author=Patrick O'Driscoll|title=Denver votes to legalize marijuana possession|date=2005-11-03|url=http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-11-03-pot_x.htm|accessdate=2006-12-30]

On November 7 2007, Denver passed an initiative to make marijuana the "lowest law enforcement priority." This was the third marijuana initiative sponsored by Safer Alternative for Enjoyable Recreation.cite web|publisher=CBS 4 Denver|author=George Merritt, AP Writer|title=Denver Voters Again Tell Police To Back Off On Pot|date=2007-11-07|url=http://cbs4denver.com/local/local_story_311065434.html]

Illinois

Marijuana is not decriminalized on a statewide basis.

In March 2004, Carbondale passed an ordinance which reduced the punishment for possession of less than 10 grams of marijuana or marijuana paraphernalia to a minimum fine of $250 in lieu of incarceration. [cite news|first=Bethany|last=Krajelis|url=http://media.www.dailyillini.com/media/storage/paper736/news/2004/09/01/News/Mayor.Satisfied.With.Drug.Policy-708357.shtml|title=Mayor satisfied with drug policy|publisher=University Wire (published on [http://www.dailyillini.com/ Daily Illini] )|date=2004-09-01|accessdate=2007-06-07]

Kansas

Marijuana is not decriminalized on a statewide basis.

In 2006, the city of Lawrence, Kansas passed an ordinance imposing fines but no jail time for marijuana possession. [cite news|first=Chad|last=Lawhorn|url=http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2006/mar/01/city_passes_marijuana_ordinance|accessdate=2007-08-27|title=City passes marijuana ordinance|publisher=Lawrence Journal World {published on [http://www.ljworld.com/ Lawrence Journal World] }|date=2006-03-01|accessdate=2007-08-27]

Maine

In 1976, Maine made possession under 35.4 grams (1.25 ounces) of marijuana a civil violation punishable by a $350 to $600 fine; stricter punishments exist for sale, cultivation, or subsequent violations within six months.cite web|url=http://www.norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4541|publisher=NORML|title=State by State Laws: Maine|date=2006|accessdate=2007-01-10]

Massachusetts

Marijuana is not decriminalized on a statewide basis.

On March 28, 2000, Amherst passed a non-binding referendum by a vote of 63-37 percent. The referendum "deprioritized" adult possession of marijuana and urged "the members of the Selectboard and the Town Manager to persuade our state representative, state senator, U.S. representative and U.S. senators to repeal the prohibition of marijuana" On February 16 2006, the Herald News Online reported that the Joint Mental Health and Substance Abuse Committee of the Massachusetts General Court voted 6-1 in favor of a bill that would have made possession of less than an ounce of marijuana a civil fine of $250. [cite news|first=Gregg|last=Milliote|publisher= [http://www.heraldnews.com/ Herald News] |accessdate=2007-06-06|title=Marijuana fight nears|url=http://www.heraldnews.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=16135095]

On November 4 2008, Massachusetts voters will have the chance to approve a decriminalization initiative called the Massachusetts Sensible Marijuana Policy Initiative or Massachusetts Ballot Question 2. The ballot measure would make possession of an ounce or less of marijuana a civil fine of $100. The measure is sponsored by the Committee for Sensible Marijuana Policy.cite web|url= http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/542/massachusetts_marijuana_decriminalization_initiative_november_ballot|publisher=Drug War Chronicle|title=Massachusetts Decrim Initiative Approved for November Ballot|date=7/11/08|accessdate= 2008-07-31]

Michigan

Marijuana is not decriminalized on a statewide basis.

In Ann Arbor, since a 1974 voter referendum, marijuana possession, control, use, and giving away or selling in the city has been subject merely to a small civil-infraction fine. ["Ann Arbor Votes $5 Fine for the Use of Marijuana," "New York Times", 3 Apr. 1974, p. 10.] City police charge violators under the local law rather than under the far stricter state laws. The amount of the fine has been altered in subsequent referenda, and as of 2008 stands at $25 for a first offense, $50 for a second offense, and $100 for the third and subsequent offenses. In 2004, Ann Arbor voters reaffirmed the civil-infraction penalty, passing Proposal C, by a vote of 75-25 percent. The measure capped penalties for the third offense and subsequent offenses at $100. [cite web|url= http://www.drugpolicy.org/news/11_04_04municipal.cfm|publisher=Drug Policy Alliance|title=Election Day 2004 - Municipal Marijuana Initiatives|date=2004-11-03|accessdate=2007-06-06]

Minnesota

Possession and sale of less than 42.5 grams (1.5 ounces) of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by a $200 fine and possible drug education; stricter punishments exist for possession of more than 1.4 grams (0.049 ounces) in a motor vehicle, driving under the influence, or sale to a minor.cite web|url=http://www.norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4545|publisher=NORML|title=Election Day 2004 - Municipal Marijuana Initiatives|date=2004-11-03|accessdate=2007-01-12]

Missouri

Marijuana is not decriminalized on a statewide basis in Missouri, although since 1999, as with all other drugs in Missouri, first-time cases of possession of marijuana no longer are prosecuted in ordinary state court, but rather in specialized drug courts. By law, treatment, rather than punishment, is the express object of any drug court action in Missouri.cite web|url=http://www.courts.mo.gov/page.asp?id=250|publisher=Missouri Judiciary - Drug Court Divisions|title=Section 478.001, Revised Statutes of Missouri (R.S.Mo.)] Despite the drug courts, however, as it stands, simple possession of less than 35 grams of marijuana is a class-A misdemeanor in Missouri, [Section 195.202, R.S.Mo.] theoretically punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of $1000.

In 2004, voters in the city of Columbia passed Proposition 2 by 61-39 percent. Proposition 2 made marijuana the "lowest priority" for law enforcement, and for possession of marijuana under 35 grams (1.2 ounces) of marijuana the offense was reduced municipally to a civil fine of a maximum of $250, with no possibility of criminal retribution, arrest, or incarceration.cite web|url=http://www.lovelycitizen.com/Articles/ArticleViewer.aspx?ArticleID=6194cd07-eb53-4c8e-8b93-cf41fb11884b|publisher= [http://www.lovelycitizen.com/ The Lovely County Citizen of Eureka Springs, Arkansas] |title=Marijuana initiative may be on city ballot|date=2004-07-24|accessdate=2007-01-12] cite web|url=http://www.mpp.org/site/c.glKZLeMQIsG/b.1088245/k.3A84/2004_Elections.htm|title=Marijuana Initiatives: November 2004|publisher=MPP|accessdate=2007-06-22]

Mississippi

In 1978, Mississippi decriminalized marijuana and in 2004, House Bill 28cite web|url= http://billstatus.ls.state.ms.us/documents/2004/html/HB/0200-0299/HB0281SG.htm|publisher= [http://billstatus.ls.state.ms.us/ Mississippi Legislative Bill Status System] |title=HB 281 (As Sent to Governor) - 2004 Regular Session|date=2004|accessdate=2007-01-12] further decriminalized marijuana by classifying possession of less than 30 grams (1.05 ounces) of marijuana a misdemeanor punishable by a $100 to $250 fine; stricter punishments exist for sale, cultivation, subsequent offenses, or possession in a motor vehicle.cite web|url=http://www.norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4546|publisher=NORML|title=State by State Laws: Mississippi|date=2006|accessdate=2007-01-10]

Montana

Marijuana is not decriminalized on a statewide basis.

On November 7 2006 Missoula County passed Initiative 2, by a vote of 54.23-45.78 percent. Initiative 2 encouraged all adult marijuana be the lowest priority for county law enforcement.cite web|url=http://www.missoulian.com/articles/2006/10/18/news/local/znews02.txt|title=Initiative 2 would make marijuana lowest priority|author=Tristan Scott|publisher= [http://missoulian.com/ The Missoulian] |date=2006-10-18|accessdate=2007-01-12]

Nebraska

Possession of 28.45 grams (one ounce) or less a civil citation punishable by a $300 fine: stricter punishments exist for sale or subsequent offenses.cite web|url=http://www.norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4549|publisher=NORML|title=State by State Laws: Nebraska|date=2006|accessdate=2007-01-10]

Nevada

In 2002, Nevada made possession of any amount of marijuana for non-medical use by persons age 21 or older punishable by a $600 fine or drug treatment; stricter punishments exist for multiple offenses, cultivation, sale, or driving under the influence. Also, for adults under age 21 and minors, possession of less than one ounce of marijuana is a class E felony, punishable by one to four years in prison and a fine of up to $5000.cite web|url=http://www.norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4550|publisher=NORML|title=State by State Laws: Nevada|date=2006|accessdate=2007-01-10] It is unclear whether persons under age 21 convicted of marijuana crimes would lose their voting rights, since the twenty-sixth amendment states that persons age eighteen or older shall not be denied the right to vote on account of age, and voting rights would only be lost because the criminal is under age 21.

New York

Possession of 25 grams (0.88 ounces) or less of marijuana is a civil citation punishable by a $25 fine and a $100 court surcharge; stricter punishments exist for sale, cultivation, or subsequent offences.cite web|url=http://www.norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4554|publisher=NORML|title=State by State Laws: New York|date=2006|accessdate=2007-01-10]

North Carolina

Possession of 14.17 grams (approximately half an ounce) is a misdemeanor punishable by 30 days incarceration and a $200 fine: stricter punishments exist for sale or cultivation. Sale or delivery of less than five grams, for no remuneration, is considered possession.cite web|url=http://www.norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4555|publisher=NORML|title=State by State Laws: North Carolina|date=2006|accessdate=2007-01-10]

Ohio

In 1975, Ohio made possession and cultivation of less than 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of marijuana and a gift of 20 grams (0.7 ounces) or less of marijuana a minor misdemeanor (same class as minor traffic violations) punishable by a $100 fine, a 6 month to 5 year drivers license suspension and a suspension of any professional licenses.cite web|url=http://www.norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4557|publisher=NORML|title=State by State Laws: Ohio|date=2006|accessdate=2007-01-10] According to the Ohio Revised Code, although possession of less than 100 grams is only a minor misdemeanor, possession of drug paraphernalia, which may include a bowl or bong, is a misdemeanor with a maximum of 30 days in prison. Trafficking marijuana is a felony.cite web|url=http://www.norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4557|publisher=NORML|title=State by State Laws: Ohio|date=2006|accessdate=2007-01-10]

Oregon

In 1972, Oregon became the first state to decriminalize marijuana. Possession of 28.45 grams (1 ounce) or less is punishable by a $500 to $1,000 fine; stricter punishments exist for sale or cultivation.cite web|url=http://www.norml.com/index.cfm?wtm_view=&Group_ID=4559|publisher=NORML|title=State by State Laws: Oregon|date=2006|accessdate=2007-01-10]

Washington

Marijuana is not decriminalized on a statewide basis.

In September 2003, Seattle passed Initiative 75, by a vote of 58-42 percent. Initiative 75 made the "investigation, arrest and prosecution" of adult marijuana possession law enforcement's lowest priority.cite web|url=http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=5750|publisher=NORML|title=Seattle Voters Approve Initiative Making Marijuana Enforcement City's "Lowest Priority"|date=2004-09-13|accessdate=2007-01-10]

Wisconsin

Marijuana is not decriminalized on a statewide basis.

On April 5 1977, Madison passed Ordinance 23.20, which made possession of less than 112 grams (almost a quarter pound) of marijuana or 28 grams of cannibis legal when for personal use in a private place.cite web|url=http://www.madisonnorml.org/ordinance.html|author=James Austin, Ph.D.|publisher= [http://www.madisonnorml.org/ Madison NORML] |title=Text of Madison Ordinance 23.20|accessdate=2007-01-10]

On May 13 1997, Milwaukee Mayor John Norquist signed a measure into law, which made possession of less than 25 grams (0.88 ounces) of cannabis a municipal ordinance violation with a fine of $250 to $500 or imprisonment for 20 days. Although, prosecutors in Milwaukee can still charge offenders under more severe state law.cite web|url=http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=3724|publisher=NORML|title=Milwaukee Moves to Decriminalize Marijuana|date=1997-05-22|accessdate=2007-01-13]

See also

*Adult lifetime cannabis use by country
*Annual cannabis use by country
*Cannabis rescheduling in the United States
*Decriminalization of non-medical marijuana in the United States
*Health issues and the effects of cannabis
*Legal and medical status of cannabis
*Legal history of marijuana in the United States
*Legal issues of cannabis
*Legality of cannabis by country
*Medical cannabis
*NORML
*Prohibition (alcohol prohibition)
*Removal of cannabis from Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act
*Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs

External links

* [http://norml.com/index.cfm?Group_ID=4516 State by state marijuana laws] from NORML

References


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