New Jersey General Assembly


New Jersey General Assembly
New Jersey General Assembly
New Jersey State Legislature
Coat of arms or logo
Type
Type Lower house
Term limits None
New session started January 12, 2011
Leadership
Speaker of the General Assembly Sheila Y. Oliver, (D)
since January 12, 2010
Speaker pro Tempore Jerry Green, (D)
since December 10, 2008
Majority Leader Joseph Cryan, (D)
since January 12, 2010
Minority Leader Alex DeCroce, (R)
since January 12, 2004
Structure
Members 80
Political groups Democratic Party (47)
Republican Party (33)
Length of term 2 years
Authority Article IV, New Jersey Constitution
Salary $49,000/year
Elections
Last election November 8, 2011
(80 seats)
Next election November 5, 2013
(80 seats)
Redistricting Legislative Control
Meeting place
New Jersey General Assembly floor.jpg
General Assembly Chamber
New Jersey State House
Trenton, New Jersey
Website
New Jersey State Legislature

The New Jersey General Assembly is the lower house of the New Jersey Legislature.

Since the election of 1967 (1968 Session), the Assembly has consisted of 80 members. Two members are elected from each of New Jersey's 40 legislative districts for a term of two years, each representing districts with average populations of 210,359 (2000 figures). To be eligible to run, a potential candidate must be at least 21 years of age, and must have lived in New Jersey for at least two years prior to the election. They also must be residents of their districts. Membership in the Assembly is considered a part-time job, and many members have employment in addition to their legislative work. Assembly members serve two-year terms, elected every odd-numbered year in November. Several members of the Assembly hold other elective office, as they are grandfathered in under a New Jersey law that banned multiple office holding in 2007.

The Assembly is led by the Speaker of the Assembly, who is elected by the membership of the chamber. After the Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey and the President of the New Jersey Senate, the Speaker of the Assembly is third in the line of succession to replace the Governor of New Jersey in the event that he or she is unable to execute the duties of that office. The Speaker decides the schedule for the Assembly, which bills will be considered, appoints committee chairmen, and generally runs the Assembly's agenda. The current Speaker is Sheila Y. Oliver (D-East Orange).

Contents

Salary and Costs

Members of the NJ General Assembly receive annually $35,000 for a base salary and $110,000 for staff salaries. In addition, they receive 12,500 postage stamps, stationery and a telephone card. They receive New Jersey State health insurance and other benefits. The total cost to the State of New Jersey for each member of the general assembly is approximately $200,000 annually.[1]

History

See: New Jersey Legislature#Before the Legislature and the Constitution of 1776 and New Jersey Legislative Council#Composition

Composition

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Vacant
End of previous legislature 48 32 80 0
Begin 47 33 80 0
November 22, 2010[2] 46 79 1
January 9, 2011[3] 47 80 0
January 9, 2011[4] 46 79 1
July 29, 2011[5] 32 78 2
November 10, 2011[6] 31 77 3
Latest voting share 59.7% 40.3%

Committees and Committee Chairs

  • Agriculture and Natural Resources - Asm. Nelson Albano (D-Cumberland)
  • Appropriations - Asw. Nellie Pou (D-Passaic)
  • Bipartisan Leadership Committee - Speaker Sheila Oliver (D-Essex) and Assembly Republican Leader Alex DeCroce (R-Morris)
  • Budget - Asm. Louis Greenwald (D-Camden)
  • Commerce and Economic Development - Asm. Alberto Coutinho (D-Essex)
  • Consumer Affairs - Asm. Paul Moriarty (D-Gloucester)
  • Education - Asm. Patrick Diegnan (D-Middlesex)
  • Environment and Solid Waste - Asm. John McKeon (D-Essex)
  • Financial Institutions and Insurance - Asm. Gary Schaer (D-Passaic)
  • Health and Senior Services - Asm. Herb Conaway, MD (D-Burlington)
  • Higher Education - Asw. Pamela Rosen Lampitt (D-Camden)
  • Homeland Security and State Preparedness - Asm. Frederick Scalera (D-Essex)
  • Housing and Local Government - Asm. Jerry Green (D-Union)
  • Human Services - Asw. Valerie Vainieri Huttle (D-Bergen)
  • Judiciary - Asm. Peter Barnes (D-Middlesex)
  • Labor - Asm. Joseph Egan (D-Middlesex)
  • Law and Public Safety - Asm. Gordon Johnson (D-Bergen)
  • Military and Veterans' Affairs - Asm. Jack Conners (D-Burlington)
  • Regulated Professions - Asm. Vincent Prieto (D-Hudson)
  • Regulatory Oversight and Gaming - Asm. John Burzichelli (D-Gloucester)
  • State Government - Asw. Linda Stender (D-Union)
  • Telecommunications and Utilities - Asm. Upendra Chivukula (D-Somerset)
  • Tourism and the Arts - Asm. Matthew Milam (D-Cumberland)
  • Transportation, Public Works and Independent Authorities - Asm. John Wisniewski (D-Middlesex)

List of past Assembly Speakers

Note: The first two subsections below end with a constitutional year: 1844 or 1947. The third subsection ends in 1966, the year of the U.S. Supreme Court decision that required legislative apportionment based on the principle of "one person, one vote".

The following is a list of Speakers of the Assembly since 1776.[7]

1776–1844

  • 1776-78: John Hart, Hunterdon
  • 1778-79: Caleb Camp, Essex
  • 1780: Josiah Hornblower, Essex
  • 1781: John Meheim, Hunterdon
  • 1782-83: Ephraim Harris, Cumberland
  • 1784: Daniel Hendrickson, Monmouth
  • 1784-86: Benjamin Van Cleve, Hunterdon
  • 1787: Ephraim Harris, Cumberland
  • 1788: Benjamin Van Cleve, Hunterdon
  • 1789: John Beatty, Middlesex
  • 1790: Jonathan Dayton, Essex
  • 1791: Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland
  • 1792-94: Silas Condict, Morris
  • 1795: Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland
  • 1796: James H. Imlay, Monmouth
  • 1797: Silas Condict, Morris
  • 1798-1800: William Coxe, Burlington
  • 1801: Silas Dickerson, Sussex
  • 1802: William Coxe, Burlington
  • 1803: Peter Gordon, Hunterdon
  • 1804-07: James Cox, Monmouth
  • 1808-09: Lewis Condict Morris
  • 1810-11: William Kennedy, Sussex
  • 1812: William Pearson, Burlington
  • 1813: Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland
  • 1814-15: Samuel Pennington, Essex
  • 1816: Charles Clark, Essex
  • 1817: Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland
  • 1818-22: David Thompson, Jr., Morris
  • 1823: Lucius Q.C. Elmer, Cumberland
  • 1824: David Johnston, Hunterdon
  • 1825-26: George K. Drake, Morris
  • 1827-28: William B. Ewing, Cumberland
  • 1829-31: Alexander Wurts, Hunterdon
  • 1832: John P. Jackson, Essex
  • 1833-35: Daniel B. Ryall, Monmouth
  • 1836: Thomas G. Haight, Monmouth
  • 1837-38: Lewis Condict, Morris
  • 1839: William Stites, Essex
  • 1840-41: John Emley, Burlington
  • 1842: Samuel Halsey, Morris
  • 1843-44: Joseph Taylor, Cumberland

1845–1947

The Constitution of 1844 expanded the General Assembly to 60 members, elected annually and apportioned to the then-nineteen counties by population.[8]

  • 1845: Isaac Van Wagenen, Essex
  • 1846: Lewis Howell, Cumberland
  • 1847-48: John W. C. Evans, Burlington
  • 1849: Edward W. Whelpley, Morris
  • 1850: John T. Nixon, Cumberland
  • 1851: John H. Phillips, Mercer
  • 1852: John Huyler, Bergen
  • 1853-54: John W. Fennimore, Burlington
  • 1855: William Parry, Burlington
  • 1856: Thomas W. Demarest, Bergen
  • 1857: Andrew Dutcher, Mercer
  • 1858: Daniel Holsman, Bergen
  • 1859: Edwin Salter, Ocean
  • 1860: Austin H. Patterson, Monmouth
  • 1861: Frederick Halstead Teese, Essex
  • 1862: Charles Haight, Monmouth
  • 1863: James T. Crowell, Middlesex
  • 1864: Joseph N. Taylor, Passaic
  • 1865: Joseph T. Crowell, Union
  • 1866: John Hill, Morris
  • 1867: G. W. N. Curtis, Camden
  • 1868: Augustus O. Evans, Hudson
  • 1869-70: Leon Abbett, Hudson
  • 1871: Albert P. Condit, Essex
  • 1872: Nathaniel Niles, Morris
  • 1873: Isaac L. Fisher, Middlesex
  • 1874: Garret A. Hobart, Passaic
  • 1875: George O. Vanderbilt, Mercer
  • 1876: John D. Caracallen, Hudson
  • 1877: Rudolph F. Rabe, Hudson
  • 1878: John Egan, Union
  • 1879: Schuyler B. Jackson, Essex
  • 1880: Sherman B. Oviatt, Monmouth
  • 1881: Harrison Van Duyne, Essex
  • 1882: John T. Dunn, Union
  • 1883: Thomas O'Connor, Essex
  • 1884: A. B. Stoney, Monmouth
  • 1885-86: Edward Ambler Armstrong, Camden
  • 1887: William M. Baird, Warren
  • 1888: Samuel D. Dickinson, Hudson
  • 1889: Robert S. Hudspeth, Hudson
  • 1890: William Christian Heppenheimer, Hudson
  • 1891-92: James J. Bergen, Somerset
  • 1893: Thomas Flynn, Passaic
  • 1894: John I. Holt, Passaic (resigned May 26)
  • 1894-95: Joseph Cross, Union
  • 1896: Louis T. DeRousse, Camden
  • 1897: George W. MacPherson, Mercer
  • 1898-99: David O. Watkins, Gloucester
  • 1900: Benjamin Franklin Jones, Essex
  • 1901-1902: William J. Bradley, Camden
  • 1903: John G. Horner, Burlington
  • 1904-1905: John Boyd Avis, Gloucester
  • 1906: Samuel K. Robbins, Burlington
  • 1907: Edgar E. Lethbridge, Essex
  • 1908: Frank B. Jess, Camden
  • 1909: John D. Prince, Passaic
  • 1910: Harry P. Ward, Bergen
  • 1911: Edward Kenny, Hudson
  • 1912: Thomas F. McCran, Passaic
  • 1913: Leon R. Taylor, Monmouth (became Acting Governor October 28)
  • 1914: Azariah M. Beekman, Somerset
  • 1915: Carlton Godfrey, Atlantic
  • 1916: Charles C. Pilgrim, Essex
  • 1917: Edward Schoen, Essex
  • 1918: Charles A. Wolverton, Camden
  • 1919: Arthur N. Pierson, Union
  • 1920: W. Irving Glover, Bergen
  • 1921: George S. Hobart, Essex
  • 1922: T. Harry Rowland, Camden
  • 1923: William W. Evans, Passaic
  • 1924: Harry G. Eaton, Essex
  • 1925: Clifford R. Powell, Burlington
  • 1926: Ralph W. Chandless, Bergen
  • 1927: Anthony J. Siracusa, Atlantic
  • 1928: Thomas L. Hanson, Middlesex
  • 1929: Guy George Gabrielson, Essex
  • 1930: William B. Knight, Camden
  • 1931: Russell S. Wise, Passaic
  • 1932: Joseph Greenberg, Hudson
  • 1933: Charles A. Otto, Jr., Union (resigned November 14)
  • 1933: Herbert J. Pascoe, Union
  • 1934: Joseph Altman, Atlantic
  • 1935: Lester H. Clee, Essex
  • 1936: Marcus W. Newcomb, Burlington
  • 1937: Thomas G. Walker, Hudson (resigned November 30)
  • 1937: Fred W. De Voe, Middlesex
  • 1938-1939: Herbert J. Pascoe, Union
  • 1940-1941: Roscoe P. McClave, Bergen
  • 1942: John E. Boswell, Cape May
  • 1943: Manfield G. Amlicke, Passaic
  • 1944: Dominic A. Cavicchia, Essex
  • 1945: Freas L. Hess, Somerset
  • 1946: Walter H. Jones, Bergen
  • 1947: Leon Leonard, Atlantic

1948–1967

  • 1948: Joseph L. Brescher, Union
  • 1949: Hugh L. Mehorter, Gloucester
  • 1950: Percy A. Miller, Jr., Essex (resigned)
  • 1950: James E. Fraser, Atlantic (died in office)
  • 1951: Merrill H. Thompson, Monmouth
  • 1952: Lawrence A. Cavinato, Bergen
  • 1953: Elvin R. Simmill, Monmouth
  • 1954: G. Clifford Thomas, Union
  • 1955: Paul M. Salsburg, Atlantic
  • 1956: Leo J. Mosch, Essex
  • 1957: Elden Mills, Morris
  • 1958: William F. Hyland, Camden
  • 1959: William Kurtz, Middlesex
  • 1960: Maurice V. Brady, Hudson
  • 1961: Le Roy J. D'Aloia, Essex
  • 1962: John W. Davis, Salem
  • 1963: Elmer M. Matthews, Essex
  • 1964: Alfred N. Beadleston, Monmouth
  • 1965: Marion West Higgins, Bergen
  • 1966: Maurice V. Brady (resigned)
  • 1966: Frederick H. Hauser, Hudson
  • 1967: Robert J. Halpin, Cumberland

1968–present

See also

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Democrat Linda R. Greenstein (District 14) resigned after being sworn in to the State Senate
  3. ^ Democrat Daniel Benson sworn in to replace Greenstein.
  4. ^ Democrat Caridad Rodriguez (District 33) resigned.
  5. ^ Republican Patrick Delaney (District 8) resigned. [2]
  6. ^ Republican Peter Biondi (District 16) died. [3]
  7. ^ Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey. J.A. Fitzgerald. 1977. http://books.google.com/books?id=1ClMAAAAMAAJ. 
  8. ^ Also in the Constitution of 1844, the Legislative Council was renamed the Senate, to be composed of one member from each of the state's 19 counties, serving a three-year term. In addition, the new constitution provided for a direct popular election of the governor, with the power to veto bills passed by the Legislature. See: New Jersey Legislature#The Constitution of 1844.

External links

Coordinates: 40°13′15″N 74°46′09″W / 40.220813°N 74.769301°W / 40.220813; -74.769301


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