Peak signal-to-noise ratio


Peak signal-to-noise ratio

The phrase peak signal-to-noise ratio, often abbreviated PSNR, is an engineering term for the ratio between the maximum possible power of a signal and the power of corrupting noise that affects the fidelity of its representation. Because many signals have a very wide dynamic range, PSNR is usually expressed in terms of the logarithmic decibel scale.

The PSNR is most commonly used as a measure of quality of reconstruction in image compression etc. It is most easily defined via the mean squared error (MSE) which for two "m"×"n" monochrome images "I" and "K" where one of the images is considered a noisy approximation of the other is defined as::mathit{MSE} = frac{1}{mn}sum_{i=0}^{m-1}sum_{j=0}^{n-1} ||I(i,j) - K(i,j)||^2

The PSNR is defined as::mathit{PSNR} = 10 cdot log_{10} left( frac{mathit{MAX}_I^2}{mathit{MSE ight) = 20 cdot log_{10} left( frac{mathit{MAX}_I}{sqrt{mathit{MSE} ight)

Here, "MAXi" is the maximum possible pixel value of the image. When the pixels are represented using 8 bits per sample, this is 255. More generally, when samples are represented using linear PCM with "B" bits per sample, "MAXI" is 2B-1.

For color images with three RGB values per pixel, the definition of PSNR is the same except the MSE is the sum over all squared value differences divided by image size and by three.

Typical values for the PSNR in lossy image and video compression are between 30 and 50 dB, where higher is better. Acceptable values for wireless transmission quality loss are considered to be about 20 dB to 25 dB [Thomos, N., Boulgouris, N. V., & Strintzis, M. G. (2006, January). Optimized Transmission of JPEG2000 Streams Over Wireless Channels. IEEE Transactions on Image Processing , 15 (1).] [Xiangjun, L., & Jianfei, C. ROBUST TRANSMISSION OF JPEG2000 ENCODED IMAGES OVER PACKET LOSS CHANNELS. ICME 2007 (pp. 947-950). School of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological University.] .

An identical image to the original will yield an undefined PSNR as the MSE will become equal to zero due to no error. In this case the PSNR value can be thought of as approaching infinity as the MSE approaches zero; this shows that a higher PSNR value provides a higher image quality. At the other end of the scale an image that comes out with all zero value pixels (black) compared to an original does not provide a PSNR of zero [Munadi, K., Kurosaki, M., Nishikawa, K., & Kiya, H. (2003). A Robust Error Protection Technique for JPEG2000 Codestream and Its Evaluation in CDMA Environment. (pp. 654-658). Department of Electrical Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University.] . This can be seen by observing the form, once again, of the MSE equation. Not all the original values will be a long distance from the zero value thus the PSNR of the image with all pixels at a value of zero is not the worst possible case.

ee also

* Data compression ratio
* Signal-to-noise ratio
* Video quality
* Subjective video quality
* Perceptual Evaluation of Video Quality (PEVQ)
* Mean square error

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Peak Signal to Noise Ratio — PSNR (sigle de Peak Signal to Noise Ratio) est une mesure de distorsion utilisée en image numérique, tout particulièrement en compression d image. Il s agit de quantifier la performance des codeurs en mesurant la qualité de reconstruction de l… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Signal-to-noise ratio — For signal to noise ratio in statistics, see Cohen s d. Signal to noise ratio (often abbreviated SNR or S/N) is a measure used in science and engineering that compares the level of a desired signal to the level of background noise. It is defined… …   Wikipedia

  • Signal to noise — Das Signal Rausch Verhältnis (auch Störabstand a bzw. (Signal )Rauschabstand aR, oft auch abgekürzt als SRV beziehungsweise SNR oder S/N vom Englischen signal to noise ratio) ist ein Maß für die technische Qualität eines aus einer Quelle… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Carrier-to-noise ratio — In telecommunications, the carrier to noise ratio, often written CNR or C/N , is the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of a modulated signal. The CNR is the quotient between the average received modulated carrier power C and the average received noise… …   Wikipedia

  • Noise (electronics) — Electronic noise [1] is a random fluctuation in an electrical signal, a characteristic of all electronic circuits. Noise generated by electronic devices varies greatly, as it can be produced by several different effects. Thermal noise is… …   Wikipedia

  • Noise Level — Das Signal Rausch Verhältnis (auch Störabstand a bzw. (Signal )Rauschabstand aR, oft auch abgekürzt als SRV beziehungsweise SNR oder S/N vom Englischen signal to noise ratio) ist ein Maß für die technische Qualität eines aus einer Quelle… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Signal-Geräusch-Verhältnis — Das Signal Rausch Verhältnis (auch Störabstand a bzw. (Signal )Rauschabstand aR, oft auch abgekürzt als SRV beziehungsweise SNR oder S/N vom Englischen signal to noise ratio) ist ein Maß für die technische Qualität eines aus einer Quelle… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Signal-Rausch-Abstand — Das Signal Rausch Verhältnis (auch Störabstand a bzw. (Signal )Rauschabstand aR, oft auch abgekürzt als SRV beziehungsweise SNR oder S/N vom Englischen signal to noise ratio) ist ein Maß für die technische Qualität eines aus einer Quelle… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Signal-Rauschabstand — Das Signal Rausch Verhältnis (auch Störabstand a bzw. (Signal )Rauschabstand aR, oft auch abgekürzt als SRV beziehungsweise SNR oder S/N vom Englischen signal to noise ratio) ist ein Maß für die technische Qualität eines aus einer Quelle… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Signal-Rauschverhältnis — Das Signal Rausch Verhältnis (auch Störabstand a bzw. (Signal )Rauschabstand aR, oft auch abgekürzt als SRV beziehungsweise SNR oder S/N vom Englischen signal to noise ratio) ist ein Maß für die technische Qualität eines aus einer Quelle… …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.