Bishop of Clogher


Bishop of Clogher

The Bishop of Clogher is an episcopal title which takes its name after the village of Clogher in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. Following the Reformation, there are now parallel apostolic successions: one of the Church of Ireland and the other of the Roman Catholic Church.

Contents

History

Clogher is one of the twenty-four dioceses established at the Synod of Rathbreasail in 1111 and consists of much of south west Ulster, taking in most of counties Fermanagh and Monaghan and parts of Tyrone, Cavan, Leitrim and Donegal. Frequently in the Irish annals the Bishop of Clogher was styled the Bishop of Oirialla. Between circa 1140 to circa 1190, County Louth was transferred from the see of Armagh to the see of Clogher. During this period the Bishop of Clogher used the style Bishop of Louth. The title Bishop of Clogher was resumed after 1193, when County Louth was restored to the see of Armagh.

Present Ordinaries

In the Church of Ireland

The present Church of Ireland bishop is the Right Reverend John Francis McDowell, who was appointed by the House of Bishops on 30 May 2011 and consecrated a bishop on 23 September[1]. The Church of Ireland bishop is unique in having two diocesan cathedrals within a single diocese, with one Dean and chapter between them: the Cathedral Church of Saint Macartan, Clogher and the Cathedral Church of Saint Macartin, Enniskillen.[2][3]

In the Roman Catholic Church

The current Roman Catholic bishop is the Most Reverend Dr Joseph Duffy who was appointed by the Holy See on 7 July 1979 and ordained bishop on 2 September 1979.[4] Bishop Duffy's resignation was accepted by Pope Benedict XVI on 6 May 2010 who also named Monsignor Liam MacDaid to be his successor. Mgr MacDaid will assume governance of the diocese upon his Episcopal Ordiantion. The Roman Catholic bishop's seat (cathedra) is located at the Cathedral Church of Saint Macartin, Monaghan.[5][6]

Pre-Reformation bishops

Pre-Reformation Bishops of Clogher [7][8]
From Until Incumbent Notes
unknown 1135 Cináeth Ua Baígill Died in office
1135 1138 Christian of Clogher
Irish: Gilla Críst Ua Morgair
Died in office
1138 1178 Áed Ua Cáellaide Regular Canon; styled bishop of Louth from 1140; resigned before May 1178; died 29 March 1182; also known as Edanus
1178 1186/87 Mael Ísu Ua Cerbaill Elected before 18 May 1178 and styled bishop of Louth; also became Archbishop of Armagh in 1184; died 1186 or 1187; also known as Maelisu O'Carroll and Malachias
c.1187 1193 Gilla Críst Ua Mucaráin Styled bishop of Louth; died in office; also known as Christianus
1194 1197 Máel Ísu Ua Máel Chiaráin OCist Died in office
c.1197 1218 Gilla Tigernaig Mac Gilla Rónáin Died in office; also known as Thomas
c.1218 1227 Donatus Ó Fidabra Translated to Armagh circa August 1227
1227 1240 Nehemias Ó Brácáin OCist Elected in September 1227; consecrated circa 1228; died before 15 November 1240
1240 1245 See vacant Probably due to the action by Archbishop Donatus Ó Fidabra of Armagh who was seeking to unite the two sees of Armagh and Clogher.
c.1245 1267 David Ó Brácáin OCist Elected circa 1245; died in office
1268 1287 Michael Mac an tSáir Elected in 1268; consecrated 9 September 1268; resigned before 1287; died 1288
1287 1310 Matthaeus Mac Cathasaig (older) Elected in 1287; consecrated 29 June 1287; died circa 1310
fl.1310 c.1316 Henricus Died in office circa 1316
c.1316 1319 Gelasius
alias Cornelius Ó Bánáin
Elected and consecrated circa 1316; died 1319
1320 1356 Nicolaus Mac Cathasaigh Elected 23 February 1320; consecrated in 1320; died 1356
1356 1358 Brian Mac Cathmhaoil Elected after September 1356; appointed circa 1357; died 1358; also known as Bernardus
c.1361 unknown Matthaeus Mac Cathasaigh (younger) Elected circa 1361; consecrated after February 1362;
unknown 1369 Aodh Ó hEóthaigh Died 27 July 1369; also known as Odo (or Hugh) Ó Neill
1373 c.1389 Johannes Ó Corcráin OSB Appointed 6 April 1373; died circa 1389; also known as Johannes Würzburg
1390 1432 Art Mac Cathmhaoil Appointed 15 February 1390; consecrated before 28 April 1390; died 10 August 1432
1433 1447 Piaras Mag Uidhir Appointed 31 August 1433; resigned before July 1447; died 5 December 1450; also known as Petrus
1447 1483 Rossa mac Tomáis Óig Mág Uidhir Appointed 21 July 1447; consecrated before 6 January 1450; died 1483; also known as Rogerius or Ross Maguire
1475 (Florence Woolley OSB) Appointed 20 November 1475 on apparently the false news of Bishop Rossa's resignation; did not get possession of the see; acted as a suffragan bishop in the Diocese of Norwich from 1478 until his death in 1500
1484 (Niall mac Séamuis Mac Mathghamhna) Appointed before 14 June 1484, but the papal bulls were not expedited; died 1488
1484 1502 John Edmund de Courcy OFM Appointed 14 June 1484; papal bulls expedited 12 September 1484; also appointed to Ross 26 September 1492, but did not renounce his claim to Clogher until 1502
1494 (Séamus mac Pilib Mac Mathghamhna) Appointed 5 November 1494, but did take effect; later became Bishop of Derry 26 November 1503; also known as James McMahon
1500 1502 (Andreas) Appointed as coadjutor bishop to Bishop de Courcy on 10 June 1500; the see was declared void by the resignation of Bishop de Courcy when Nehemias Ó Cluainín was appointed in January 1502
1502 1503 Nehemias Ó Cluainín OESA Appointed 24 January 1502; resigned 1503
1504 Giolla Pádraig Ó Connálaigh Appointed 6 March 1504; died before December 1504; also known as Patricius
1505 1515 Eoghan Mac Cathmhaoil Appointed 4 April 1505; died 1515; also known as Eugenius or Owen McCaul
1517 1534 Pádraig Ó Cuilín OESA Appointed 11 February 1517; died before 26 March 1534; also known as Patrick O'Cullen

Post-Reformation bishops

Church of Ireland succession

Church of Ireland Bishops of Clogher [9][10]
From Until Incumbent Notes
1535 1569 Hugh O'Carolan Papal appointment 6 August 1535; consecrated in January 1537; renounced papal appointment 1 October 1542; confirmed (re-appointed) by King Henry VIII 8 October 1542; died in office
1570 1571 Miler Magrath Roman Catholic Bishop of Down and Connor; accepted royal supremacy in 1567; appointed to Clogher by letters patent 18 September 1570; translated to Cashel 3 February 1571
1571 1605 See vacant Denis Campbell, Dean of Limerick, was nominated to be bishop of Clogher, Derry and Raphoe in 1603, but died before consecration in July 1603
1605 1621 George Montgomery Nominated 15 February 1605; letters patent 13 June 1605; also held Derry and Raphoe 1605 to 1609, and Meath 1609 to 1621; died in office 15 January 1621
1621 1645 James Spottiswood Nominated 20 January 1621; mandate for consecration 22 October 1621; died in March 1645; his brother John Spottiswood was Archbishop of St Andrews 1615-1639
1645 1661 Henry Jones Nominated 29 September and consecrated 9 November 1645; translated to Meath 25 May 1661; his father Lewis Jones was Bishop of Killaloe 1633-1646
1661 1671 John Leslie Translated from Raphoe; nominated 29 April 1661; letters patent 17 June 1661; died 8 September 1671
1671 1672 Robert Leslie Translated from Raphoe; letters patent 26 October 1671; died 10 August 1672
1672 1687 Roger Boyle Translated from Down and Connor; nominated 29 August 1672; letters patent 19 September 1672; died 26 November 1687
1687 1690 See vacant
1691 1697 Richard Tennison Translated from Killala and Achonry; nominated 4 December 1690; letters patent 28 February 1691; translated to Meath 25 June 1697
1697 1717 St George Ashe Translated from Cloyne; nominated 1 June 1697; letters patent 25 June 1697; translated to Derry 25 February 1717
1717 1745 John Stearne Translated from Dromore; nominated 28 February 1717; letters patent 30 March 1717; died 6 June 1745
1745 1758 Robert Clayton Translated from Cork and Ross; nominated 3 August 1745; letters patent 26 August 1745; died 26 February 1758
1758 1782 John Garnett Translated from Ferns and Leighlin; nominated 14 March 1758; letters patent 4 April 1758; died 1 March 1782
1782 1795 Sir John Hotham Bt Translated from Ossory; nominated 11 April 1782; letters patent 17 May 1782; also succeeded as 9th Baronet Hotham of Scarborough 25 January 1794; died 3 November 1795
1796 1797 William Foster Translated from Kilmore; nominated 26 December 1795; letters patent 21 January 1796; died before 4 November 1797
1797 1819 John Porter Translated to Killala and Achonry; nominated 18 December 1797; letters 30 December 1797; died 27 July 1819
1819 1820 Lord John Beresford Translated from Raphoe; nominated 29 August 1819; letters patent 25 September 1819; translated to Dublin 21 April 1820
1820 1822 Hon Percy Jocelyn Translated from Ferns and Leighlin; nominated and letters patent 3 April 1820; deprived 21 October 1822; died 2 December 1843
1822 1850 Lord Robert Tottenham Translated from Ferns and Leighlin; nominated 26 November 1822; letters patent 21 December 1822; died 28 April 1850; his father was Charles Loftus, 1st Marquess of Ely
In 1850, the Diocese of Clogher was united to the Diocese of Armagh
1850 1862 Lord John Beresford Formerly bishop of Clogher 1819-1820; he was Arcbishop of Dublin 1820-1822, then Archbishop of Armagh 1822-1862; became Bishop of Clogher again in 1850; died 18 July 1862
1862 1885 Marcus Beresford Translated from Kilmore, Elphin and Ardagh; appointed Archbishop of Armagh and Bishop of Clogher by letters patent 15 October 1862; died 26 December 1885
In 1886, the Diocese of Clogher was separated from the Diocese of Armagh
1886 1902 Charles Stack Elected 4 June 1886 and consecrated 29 June 1886; resigned 31 December 1902; died 9 January 1914
1903 1907 Charles D'Arcy Elected 21 January and consecrated 24 February 1903; translated to Ossory, Ferns and Leighlin 6 November 1907
1908 1923 Maurice Day Elected 19 December 1907; consecrated 25 January 1908; died 27 May 1923
1923 1943 James MacManaway Elected 9 November and consecrated 6 August 1923; resigned 30 September 1943; died 29 November 1947
1944 1958 Richard Tyner Elected 9 November 1943; consecrated 6 January 1944; died 6 April 1958
1958 1969 Alan Buchanan Elected 17 June and consecrated 29 September 1958; translated to Dublin 22 November 1969
1970 1973 Richard Hanson Elected 9 December 1969; consecrated 17 March 1970; resigned 31 March 1973
1973 1980 Robert Heavener Elected and consecrated in 1973; retired in 1980; died 8 March 2005.[11]
1980 1986 Gordon McMullan Elected 13 June and consecrated 7 September 1980; translated to Down and Dromore in 1986.[12]
1986 2001 Brian Hannon Elected and consecrated in 1986; retired 5 October 2001.[13]
2002 2011 Michael Jackson Elected 21 November 2001; consecrated 6 March 2002; translated to Dublin & Glendalough, 8 May 2011
2011 present John Francis McDowell Appointed by the House of Bishops 30 May 2011; consecrated 23 September[14].

Roman Catholic succession

Roman Catholic Bishops of Clogher [15][16]
From Until Incumbent Notes
1546 1560 Raymund MacMahon Appointed 27 August 1546; died circa 1560
1560 1592 Cornelius MacArdel Appointed 29 May 1560; died circa 1592
1592 1609 See vacant
1609 1611 Eugene Matthews Appointed 31 August 1609; translated to Dublin 2 May 1611
1611 1622 See vacant
apptd. 1622 Patrick Quinn Appointed vicar apostolic to administer the see by papal brief 30 July 1622
1627 to 1642
(as vicar apostolic)
Heber MacMahon Appointed vicar apostolic to administer the see by papal brief 17 November 1627; translated to Down and Connor 10 March 1642, but translated back to Clogher as bishop 27 June 1643; died 17 July 1650
1643 to 1650
(as bishop)
apptd. 1651 Philip Crolly Appointed vicar apostolic to administer the see by papal brief 15 November 1651 and re-appointed 17 April 1657
1671 1675 Patrick Duffy OFM Appointed 26 May 1671; died 1 August 1675
1676 1689 Patrick Tyrrell OFM Appointed 13 May 1676; also became apostolic administrator of Kilmore 1678-1689; translated to Meath 24 January 1689
1689 1707 See vacant
1707 1715 Hugh MacMahon Appointed 15 March 1707; translated to Armagh 5 July 1715
1715 1727 See vacant
1727 1737 Bernard MacMahon Appointed 7 April 1727; translated to Armagh 8 November 1737
1738 1747 Ross MacMahon Appointed 17 May 1738; translated to Armagh 3 August 1747
1747 1778 Daniel O’Reilly Appointed 11 September 1747; died 24 March 1778
1778 1801 Hugh O'Reilly Appointed coadjutor bishop 16 May 1777; succeeded 24 March 1778; died 3 November 1801
1801 1824 James Murphy Appointed coadjutor bishop May 1798; succeeded 3 November 1801; died 19 November 1824
1824 1844 Edward Kernan Appointed coadjutor bishop 18 August 1816; consecrated 11 (or 12) April 1818; succeeded 19 November 1824; died 20 February 1844
1844 1864 Charles McNally Appointed coadjutor bishop 21 July 1843; consecrated 5 November 1843; succeeded 20 February 1844; died 20 November 1864
1864 1893 James Donnelly Appointed 11 December 1864; consecrated 26 February 1865; died 29 December 1893
1894 1909 Richard Owens Appointed 6 July 1894; consecrated 26 August 1894; died 3 March 1909
1909 1942 Patrick McKenna Appointed 12 June 1909; consecrated 10 October 1909; died 7 February 1942
1943 1969 Eugene O'Callaghan Appointed 17 February 1943; consecrated 4 April 1943; resigned 3 December 1969; died 21 May 1973
1969 1979 Patrick Mulligan Appointed 3 December 1969; consecrated 18 January 1870; resigned 3 September 1979; 21 January 1991
1979 2010 Joseph Duffy Appointed 7 July 1979; consecrated 2 September 1979; resigned 6 May 2010
2010 present Liam MacDaid Appointed 6 May 2010;

See also

References

  1. ^ http://ireland.anglican.org/news/3758
  2. ^ "St. Macartin's Cathedral, Enniskillen". Church of Ireland. http://clogher.anglican.org/index.php?p=cathedrals. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  3. ^ "St. Macartin's Cathedral, Enniskillen". enniskillencathedral.com. http://www.enniskillencathedral.com/. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  4. ^ "Most Rev Joseph Duffy, Bishop of Clogher". Diocese of Clogher (Roman Catholic). http://www.clogherdiocese.ie/bishop-joseph-duffy. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  5. ^ "St. Macartan's Cathedral (Monaghan)". Parish of Monaghan and Rackwallace . http://www.monaghan-rackwallace.ie/parish-churches/cathedral. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  6. ^ "St. Macartin's Cathedral, Monaghan". ARCHiSEEK. http://ireland.archiseek.com/buildings_ireland/monaghan/monaghan/stmacartans.html. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  7. ^ Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (Third Edition ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 337–339. ISBN 0-521-56350-X. 
  8. ^ Cotton, Henry (1849). The Succession of the Prelates and Members of the Cathedral Bodies of Ireland. Fasti ecclesiae Hiberniae. Vol. 3, The Province of Ulster. Dublin: Hodges and Smith. pp. 73–77. 
  9. ^ Fryde, ibid., pp. 382-383.
  10. ^ Cotton, ibid., pp. 77-84.
  11. ^ "Standing Committee News - March 2005". Church of Ireland. 15-03-2005. http://www.ireland.anglican.org/index.php?do=news&newsid=843. 
  12. ^ Neill, Matthew (1995). "Rt Rev Gordon McMullan". Ecclesia De Drum: Recollections of the Parish of Drumbeg, Diocese of Down. http://lisburn.com/books/drumbeg/drumbeg2.html#mcmullan. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 
  13. ^ "Clogher Diocese says farewell to retiring bishop". Church of Ireland. 15-03-2005. http://www.ireland.anglican.org/archives/pressreleases/prarchive2001/hanpres.html. 
  14. ^ http://ireland.anglican.org/news/3758
  15. ^ Fryde, ibid., p. 418.
  16. ^ "Diocese of Clogher". Catholic Hierarchy. http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/diocese/dclog.html. Retrieved 2009-06-21. 



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