Government of the 1st Scottish Parliament


Government of the 1st Scottish Parliament
Government of the 1st (1999)
Government of the 2nd (2003)
Government of the 3rd (2007)
Government of the 4th (2011)

The Executive of the 1st Scottish Parliament was formed following the 1999 election.

Contents

Dewar government

The Dewar government (17 May 1999–11 October 2000) was formed by a coalition of Labour and the Liberal Democrats. Donald Dewar, Scotland's first First Minister, obtained the Scottish Parliament's approval to the first slate of members of the Scottish Executive and Junior Scottish Ministers on 19 May 1999.

Cabinet

Office Name Term Party
First Minister Donald Dewar 1999–2000 Labour Party
Deputy First Minister
Minister for Justice
Jim Wallace 1999–2000 Liberal Democrats
Minister for Children and Education Sam Galbraith 1999–2000 Labour Party
Minister for Social Inclusion, Local Government and Housing Wendy Alexander 1999–2000 Labour Party
Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning Henry McLeish 1999–2000 Labour Party
Minister for Finance Jack McConnell 1999–2000 Labour Party
Minister for Health and Community Care Susan Deacon 1999–2000 Labour Party
Chief Whip and Government Business Manager Tom McCabe 1999–2000 Labour Party
Minister for Rural Affairs Ross Finnie 1999–2000 Liberal Democrats
Minister for Transport and the Environment Sarah Boyack 1999–2000 Labour Party
Lord Advocate Andrew Hardie QC 1999–2000 Labour Party
Colin Boyd QC 2000 Labour Party

Junior ministers

Office Name Term Party
Deputy Minister for Children and Education Peter Peacock 1999–2000 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Culture and Sport Rhona Brankin 1999–2000 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Social Inclusion, Equality and the Voluntary Sector Jackie Baillie 1999–2000 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Local Government Frank McAveety 1999–2000 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning Nicol Stephen 1999–2000 Liberal Democrats
Deputy Minister for Highlands and Islands and Gaelic Alasdair Morrison 1999–2000 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Health and Community Care Iain Gray 1999–2000 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Justice (with particular responsibility for Land Reform) Angus MacKay 1999–2000 Labour Party
Deputy Business Manager and Liberal Democrat Whip Iain Smith 1999–2000 Liberal Democrats
Deputy Minister for Rural Affairs (with particular responsibility for Fisheries) John Home Robertson 1999–2000 Labour Party
Solicitor General for Scotland Colin Boyd QC 1999–2000 Labour Party
Neil Davidson QC 2000 Labour Party

In March 2000, Andrew Hardie was made a Senator of the College of Justice. His office as Lord Advocate was filled by the Solicitor General, Colin Boyd, and the office of Solicitor General was filled by Neil Davidson.

McLeish government

The McLeish government (27 October 2000–8 November 2001) was formed following the death of Donald Dewar on the 11 October 2000, Henry McLeish was appointed as First Minister on 27 October 2000. It continued the Labour/Liberal Democrat coalition.

Cabinet

Office Name Term Party
First Minister Henry McLeish 2000–2001 Labour Party
Deputy First Minister
Minister for Justice
Jim Wallace 2000–2001 Liberal Democrats
Minister for Education, Europe and External Affairs Jack McConnell 2000–2001 Labour Party
Minister for Social Justice Jackie Baillie 2000–2001 Labour Party
Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning Wendy Alexander 2000–2001 Labour Party
Minister for Environment, Sport and Culture Sam Galbraith 2000–2001 Labour Party
Minister for Finance and Local Government Angus MacKay 2000–2001 Labour Party
Minister for Health and Community Care Susan Deacon 2000–2001 Labour Party
Minister for Parliament Tom McCabe 2000–2001 Labour Party
Minister for Rural Development Ross Finnie 2000–2001 Liberal Democrats
Minister for Transport Sarah Boyack 2000–2001 Labour Party
Lord Advocate Colin Boyd QC 2000–2001 Labour Party

Junior ministers

Office Name Term Party
Deputy Minister for Education, Europe and External Affairs Nicol Stephen 2000–2001 Liberal Democrats
Deputy Minister for Culture and Sport Rhona Brankin 2000–2001 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Social Justice Margaret Curran 2000–2001 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Enterprise & Lifelong Learning and Gaelic Alasdair Morrison 2000–2001 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Highlands and Islands and Gaelic Alasdair Morrison 2000–2001 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Sport and Culture Allan Wilson 2000–2001 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Finance and Local Government Peter Peacock 2000–2001 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Health and Community Care Malcolm Chisholm 2000–2001 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Justice Iain Gray 2000–2001 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Parliament Tavish Scott 2000–2001 Liberal Democrat
Euan Robson 2001–2001 Liberal Democrats
Deputy Minister for Rural Development Rhona Brankin 2000–2001 Labour Party
Solicitor General for Scotland Neil Davidson QC 2000–2001 Labour Party

Tavish Scott resigned on 9 March 2001 following disagreement with Scottish Executive policy on fisheries. He was replaced by Euan Robson. Sam Galbraith resigned on 20 March 2001, and his environment portfolio was combined with that of rural development. Planning was added to the Transport portfolio, and Lewis Macdonald was appointed as Deputy Minister for Transport and Planning. Allan Wilson became Deputy Minister for Sport, the Arts and Culture, reporting to the First Minister.

First McConnell government

The First McConnell government (22 November 2001–27 March 2003) was formed following Henry McLeish's resignation as First Minister after the Officegate scandal, Jack McConnell was appointed as First Minister 22 November 2001. It continued the Labour/Liberal Democrat coalition.

Cabinet

Office Name Term Party
First Minister Jack McConnell 2001–2003 Labour Party
Deputy First Minister
Minister for Justice
Jim Wallace 2001–2003 Liberal Democrats
Minister for Education and Young People Cathy Jamieson 2001–2003 Labour Party
Minister for Social Justice Iain Gray 2001–2002 Labour Party
Margaret Curran 2002–2003 Labour Party
Minister for Enterprise, Transport and Lifelong Learning Wendy Alexander 2001–2002 Labour Party
Iain Gray 2002–2003 Labour Party
Minister for Culture and Sport Mike Watson 2001–2003 Labour Party
Minister for Finance and Public Services Andy Kerr 2001–2003 Labour Party
Minister for Health and Community Care Malcolm Chisholm 2001–2003 Labour Party
Minister for Parliament Patricia Ferguson 2001–2003 Labour Party
Minister for the Environment and Rural Development Ross Finnie 2001–2003 Liberal Democrats
Lord Advocate Colin Boyd QC 2001–2003 Labour Party


Junior Ministers

Office Name Term Party
Deputy Minister for Culture and Sport Elaine Murray 2001–2003 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Education and Young People Nicol Stephen 1999–2000 Liberal Democrats
Deputy Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning Lewis Macdonald 2001–2003 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for the Environment and Rural Development Allan Wilson 2001–2003 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Finance and Public Services Peter Peacock 2001–2003 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Health and Community Care Hugh Henry 2001–2002 Liberal Democrats
Frank McAveety 2002–2003 Labour Party
Mary Mulligan 2001–2003 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Justice Richard Simpson 2001–2002 Labour Party
Hugh Henry 2002–2003 Labour Party
Deputy Minister for Parliamentary Business Euan Robson 2001–2003 Liberal Democrats
Deputy Minister for Social Justice Margaret Curran 2001–2003 Labour Party
Hugh Henry 2002 Labour Party
Des McNulty 2002–2003 Labour Party
Solicitor General for Scotland Elish Angiolini QC 2001–2003


On 4 May 2002, Wendy Alexander resigned from the Scottish Executive. Her post as Enterprise Minister was filled by Iain Gray, and his post as Social Justice Minister was in turn filled by Margaret Curran, who had been his deputy. Hugh Henry moved from Health to become Deputy Minister for Social Justice and Frank McAveety returned to ministerial office as one of the Deputy Ministers for Health and Community Care. In November 2002 Richard Simpson resigned, Hugh Henry replaced him and Des McNulty became Deputy Minister for Social Justice.

See also


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