Pick Yourself Up


Pick Yourself Up

"Pick Yourself Up" is a popular song composed in 1936 by Jerome Kern, with lyrics by Dorothy Fields. It has a verse and chorus, as well as a third section, though the third section is often omitted in recordings. Like most popular songs of the era, it features a 32 bar chorus, though with an extended coda, and is done in AABA style, though with variations among the A sections.

The song was written for the film "Swing Time" (1936), where it was introduced by Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. Ginger plays a dance instructor whom Fred follows into her studio; he pretends to have two left feet in order to get her to dance with him. Fred sings the verse to her and she responds with the chorus. After an interlude, they dance to the tune. (Author John Mueller has written their dance "is one of the very greatest of Astaire's playful duets: boundlessly joyous, endlessly re-seeable.")

Astaire would also record the song on his own that year for the Brunswick label. The tune served as the theme song for the short-lived 1955-56 prime time television variety series "The Johnny Carson Show".

Notable recordings

*Anita O'Day - "Pick Yourself Up with Anita O'Day" (1956)
*Ella Fitzgerald - "Ella Swings Brightly with Nelson" (1962)
*Frank Sinatra - "Sinatra and Swingin' Brass" (1962)
*Natalie Cole - "Stardust" (1996)
*Diana Krall - "When I Look in Your Eyes" (1999)
*Sylvia McNair with Andre Previn - "Sure Thing: The Jerome Kern Songbook" (1994)


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  • pick yourself up — ˌpick yourself ˈup derived to stand up again after you have fallen • He just picked himself up and went on running. • (figurative) She didn t waste time feeling sorry for herself she just picked herself up and carried on. Main entry: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • pick yourself up — do not quit, persevere, roll with the punches    Don t let a failure stop you. Pick yourself up and try again …   English idioms

  • Pick Yourself Up with Anita O'Day — Infobox Album | Name = Pick Yourself Up with Anita O Day Type = Album Artist = Anita O Day | Released = 1956 Recorded = January 4 December 20, 1956 Genre = Jazz Length = 64:16 Label = Verve Records Producer = Norman Granz, Anita O Day Reviews =… …   Wikipedia

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  • pick\ holes\ in — • pick a hole in • pick holes in v. phr. To criticize or find fault with something, such as a speech, a statement, a theory, etc. It is easier to pick holes in someone else s argument than to make a good one yourself. Syn.: pick a hole in …   Словарь американских идиом

  • pick over the bones of something — phrase to examine something very carefully in order to find anything of value and keep it for yourself There wasn’t much left of the estate after the lawyers had picked over the bones. Thesaurus: to search for something or someonesynonym… …   Useful english dictionary


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