Diaphragm (structural system)


Diaphragm (structural system)

In structural engineering, a diaphragm is a structural system used to transfer lateral loads to shear walls or frames primarily through in-plane shear stress. These lateral loads are usually wind and earthquake loads, but other lateral loads such as lateral earth pressure or hydrostatic pressure can also be resisted by diaphragm action.

The diaphragm of a structure often does double duty as the floor system or roof system in a building, or the deck of a bridge, which simultaneously supports gravity loads.

Diaphragms are usually constructed of plywood or oriented strand board in timber construction; metal deck or composite metal deck in steel construction; or a concrete slab in concrete construction.

The two primary types of diaphragm are flexible and rigid. Flexible diaphragms resist lateral forces depending on the tributary area, irrespective of the flexibility of the members that they are transferring force to. On the other hand, rigid diaphragms transfer load to frames or shear walls depending on their flexibility and their location in the structure. The flexibility of a diaphragm affects the distribution of lateral forces to the vertical components of the lateral force resisting elements in a structure. [1]

Parts of a diaphragm include:

  • the membrane, used as a shear panel to carry in-plane shear
  • the drag strut member, used to transfer the load to the shear walls or frames
  • the chord, used to resist the tension and compression forces that develop in the diaphragm, since the membrane is usually incapable of handling these loads alone.

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Diaphragm — Contents 1 Optics and photography 2 Acoustics 3 Other 4 …   Wikipedia

  • Biological system — An example of a system: The nervous system. This basic diagram shows that this system is made up of 4 different basic organs: the brain, the cerebellum, the spinal cord, and the nerves. In biology, a biological system (or organ system or body… …   Wikipedia

  • digestive system, human — Introduction  the system used in the human body for the process of digestion. The human digestive system consists primarily of the digestive tract (alimentary canal), or the series of structures and organs through which food and liquids pass… …   Universalium

  • renal system — ▪ anatomy Introduction  in humans (human body), organ system that includes the kidneys, where urine is produced, and the ureters, bladder, and urethra for the passage, storage, and voiding of urine.       In many respects the human excretory, or… …   Universalium

  • Nervous system — Nerve redirects here. For other uses, see Nerve (disambiguation). This article is about the nervous system. For parts of the nervous system commonly called nerves, see Peripheral nerve. Nervous system The Human N …   Wikipedia

  • nervous system — Anat., Zool. 1. the system of nerves and nerve centers in an animal or human, including the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and ganglia. 2. a particular part of this system. Cf. autonomic nervous system, central nervous system, peripheral nervous… …   Universalium

  • Lymphoid system — Lymphatic drainage redirects here. For the massage technique, see Manual lymphatic drainage. Lymphoid System An image displaying the lymphoid system. Latin …   Wikipedia

  • Immune system — A scanning electron microscope image of a single neutrophil (yellow), engulfing anthrax bacteria (orange). An immune system is a system of biological structures and processes within an organism that protects against disease by identifying and… …   Wikipedia

  • nervous system disease — Introduction       any of the diseases or disorders that affect the functioning of the human nervous system (nervous system, human). Everything that humans sense, consider, and effect and all the unlearned reflexes of the body depend on the… …   Universalium

  • nervous system, human — ▪ anatomy Introduction       system that conducts stimuli from sensory receptors to the brain and spinal cord and that conducts impulses back to other parts of the body. As with other higher vertebrates, the human nervous system has two main… …   Universalium


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.