Candid photography


Candid photography

Candid photography is photography that focuses on spontaneity rather than technique, on the immersion of a camera within events rather than focusing on setting up a staged situation or on preparing a lengthy camera setup.

Description

Candid photography is best described as un-posed and unplanned, immediate and unobtrusive. This is in contrast to classic photography, which includes aspects such as carefully staged portrait photography, landscape photography or object photography. Candid photography catches moments of life from immersion in it.

Candid photography is opposite to the stalking involved in animal photography, sports photography or photographic journalistic intrusion, which all have a focus on getting distant objects photographed, e.g. by using telephoto lenses. Candid photography's setup includes a photographer who is there with the "subjects" to be photographed, close, and not hidden. People photographed on candid shots either ignore or accept the close presence of the photographer's camera without posing.

The events documented are often private, they involve people in close relation to something they do, or they involve people's relation to each other. Candids are the kinds of pictures taken at children's birthday parties and on Christmas morning, opening the presents; the pictures a wedding photographer takes at the reception, of people dancing, eating, and socializing with other guests.

As an art form

Some professional photographers develop candid photography into an art form. Henri Cartier-Bresson might be considered the master of the art of candid photography, capturing the "decisive moment" in everyday life over a span of several decades. Arthur Fellig, better known as Weegee, was one of the great photographers to document life in the streets of New York to often capture life — and death — at their rawest edges. Almost all successful photographers in the field of candid photography master the art of making people relax and feel at ease around the camera, they master the art of blending in at parties, of finding acceptance despite an obvious intrusive element - the camera. This is certainly true for most celebrity photographers, such as René Burri, Raeburn Flerlage or Murray Garret.

It could be argued that candid photography is the purest form of photojournalism. There is a fine line between photojournalism and candid photography, a line that was blurred by photographers such as Bresson and Weegee. Photojournalism often sets out to tell a story in images, whereas candid photography simply captures people living an event.

Camera equipment

Equipment for candid photography is lightweight, small and unobtrusive rather than big and intimidating. Lomo rule photography describes using an old Russian point-and shoot-camera for candid photography. The larger the equipment, the more difficult to master the art of making the equipment appear to be unobtrusive to still achieve candid photography. Digital cameras, therefore, have been less popular for candid photography than 35mm point and shoot cameras. In recent times however, prosumer level digital single-lens reflex cameras respond as fast as professional 35mm film cameras.

Candid photography, unless performed digitally, requires sensitive film, as flash lights can cause cameras to stop from being an immersed part of a meeting or party, causing people to stage their photo appearance rather than behaving naturally. For this reason, candid photography often takes place outdoors, where the sun provides the light. Due to higher film speeds being required for inside photography or dark photography without flashlight, candid photography can feature grainy, high contrast images.

As small point and shoot cameras with affordable lenses are used widely for candid photography, photographs may feature vignetting and oversaturation of colours. Due to short reaction times, lighting or focus may be off. Due to flashlight being obstructive to candid photography, pictures may show glary overexposure, underexposure, color shifts or blurring. All these are usually accepted as features of candid photography.

ee also

* Celebrity photography
* Documentary photography
* Lomography
* Paparazzi
* Photojournalism
* Reportage
* Secret photography
* Street photography

External links

* [http://www.apogeephoto.com/apr2001/bernstein4_2001.shtml "Apogee" magazine article on candid photography]
* [http://commfaculty.fullerton.edu/lester/writings/chapter5.html "Photojournalism Ethics": Chapter 5, "The Right to Privacy"]


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Photography — is the art, science and practice of creating durable images by recording light or other electromagnetic radiation, either electronically by means of an image sensor or chemically by means of a light sensitive material such as photographic… …   Wikipedia

  • PHOTOGRAPHY — The first photographer known to be of Jewish birth was solomon nunes carvalho , an American who in 1853–54 served as artist photographer with John C. Frémont s expedition to the Far West. However, the 19th century did not produce many… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • photography — Synonyms and related words: X ray photography, abstract art, aerial photography, aerophotography, albertype, art, art form, artist, arts and crafts, arts of design, astrophotography, book printing, calligraphy, candid photography, cave art,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • candid — 1620s, white, from L. candidum white; pure; sincere, honest, upright, from candere to shine, from PIE root *kand to glow, to shine (see CANDLE (Cf. candle)). In English, metaphoric extension to frank first recorded 1670s (Cf. Fr. candide open,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • photography — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Picture taking Nouns 1. photography, picture taking; aerial, architectural, available light, candid, digital, fashion, fine art, infrared, laser, paper negative, print, product, scenic, still, stereo… …   English dictionary for students

  • photography, history of — Introduction       method of recording the image of an object through the action of light, or related radiation, on a light sensitive material. The word, derived from the Greek photos (“light”) and graphein (“to draw”), was first used in the… …   Universalium

  • candid camera — noun a miniature camera with a fast lens • Hypernyms: ↑camera, ↑photographic camera * * * noun 1. : a usually small camera equipped with a fast lens and used for taking informal photographs of unposed subjects often without their knowledge 2. : a …   Useful english dictionary

  • candid — adjective Etymology: French & Latin; French candide, from Latin candidus bright, white, from candēre to shine, glow; akin to Welsh can white, Sanskrit candati it shines Date: 1606 1. white < candid flames > 2. free from bias, prejudice, or malice …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Outline of photography — The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to photography: Photography – the process of making pictures by the action of recording Light patterns, reflected or emitted from objects, on a photosensitive medium or a… …   Wikipedia

  • Portal:Photography — Wikipedia portals: Culture Geography Health History Mathematics Natural sciences People Philosophy Religion Society Technology …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.