Burzenland


Burzenland

The Burzenland (Audio|De-Burzenland.ogg|listen; _hu. Barcaság; _ro. Ţara Bârsei) is a historic and ethnographic area in southeastern Transylvania, Romania with a mixed population (German, Romanian, Hungarian). Since the exodus of most of the German-speaking Transylvanian Saxons in the 20th century, this region has been predominantly inhabited by Romanians.

Geography

The Burzenland lies within the Carpathian Mountains, bordered approximately by Apaţa in the north, Bran in the southwest and Prejmer in the east. Its most important city is Braşov. Burzenland is named after the stream Bârsa ("Barca", "Burzen", 1231: "Borza"), which flows into the Olt river. [ [http://www.inst.at/berge/perspektiven/viorel.htm Deutsche Bergnamen in Tara Barsei (Burzenland)/Rumänien] . Accessed January 22 2007. de icon] [ [http://www.timediver.de/deutscher_orden_im_burzenland.html Deutscher Orden im Burzenland (1211-1225)] . Accessed January 22 2007. de icon] The Romanian word "bârsă" is supposedly of Dacian origin ("see List of Romanian words of possible Dacian origin").

History

Middle Ages

Based on archaeological evidence, it seems German colonization of the region started in the middle of 12th century during the reign of King Géza II of Hungary.cite book|editor=Pinter, Zeno Karl; Ţiplic, Ion Marian; Ţiplic, Maria Emilia; (eds.)|title=Biblioteca Septemcastrensis XII. Relaţii interetnice în Transilvania (secolele VI-XIII)|language=Romanian|year=2005|isbn=973-709-158-2|chapter=Mormintele cu gropi antropomorfe din Transilvania şi relaţia lor cu primul val de colonizare germană|author=Ioniţă, Adrian|pages=p.215-226|chapterurl=http://arheologie.ulbsibiu.ro/publicatii/bibliotheca/relatii%20interetnice%20in%20transilvania/011%20ionita/articol1.htm|accessdate=2007-02-12] The German colonists from this region are attested in documents as early as 1192 when "terra Bozza" is mentioned as being settled by Germans ("Theutonici").cite book|author=Ţiplic, Ion Marian|title=Contribuţii la istoria spaţiului românesc în perioada migraţiilor şi evul mediu timpuriu (secolele IV-XIII)|language=Romanian|publisher=Institutul European|year=2005|pages=p.165-178]

In 1211 the region was given to the Teutonic Knights by King Andrew II of Hungary in return for guarding the southeastern border of the Kingdom of Hungary against the Cumans. While the king retained his right to mint currency and claims on gold or silver deposits that would be uncovered, he granted the Teutonic Order the right to establish markets and administer justice. The crusaders were also free from taxes and tolls.cite book|last=Urban|first=William|title=The Teutonic Knights: A Military History|year=2003|publisher=Greenhill Books|location=London|pages=290|isbn=1-85367-535-0] The Teutonic Knights began building wood-and-earth forts in the area and they had constructed five castles ("quinque castra fortia"): Marienburg, Schwarzenburg, Rosenau, Kreuzburg, and Kronstadt, some of which were made of stone. The military order was successful in reducing the threat of the nomadic Cumans. German already in Transylvania and volunteer settlers from the Holy Roman Empire developed farms and villages nearby to support the forts and settle the land. Whether the territory was already populated at the time is disputed. Some medieval sources indicate it was uninhabited, ["Terram Borza nomine ultra silvas versus Cumanos, licet desertam et inhabitatam". Georg Daniel Teutsch and Friedrich Firnhaber. "Urkundenbuch zur Geschichte Siebenbürgens". Vienna, 1857, I, no. 10] a view challenged by some scholars invoking archaeological and documentary evidence.cite book|author=Brezeanu, Stelian|title=Identităţi şi solidarităţi medievale|year=2002|isbn=973-653-347-6|pages=p.222-232 The diplomas from 1222 speak of people inhabiting these lands at the time when the donation was made.] Bountiful agricultural yields led to further colonization by German immigrants.

The Teutonic Knights disregarded the rights of the local bishopric, however, and angered Hungarian nobility which had claims on the region. Led by Béla, the heir to the throne, the nobility pressed the need to expel the knights upon King Andrew II after his return from the Fifth Crusade. Grand Master Hermann von Salza attempted to loosen the Order's ties to the Hungarian crown by drawing closer to the Papacy. Andrew subsequently evicted the Order with his army in 1225, although Pope Honorius III protested to no effect.cite book|last=Christiansen|first=Erik|title=The Northern Crusades|year=1997|publisher=Penguin Books|location=London|pages=287|isbn=0-14-026653-4] The confusing status of the Teutonic Knights within the Kingdom of Hungary led Hermann von Salza to insist upon autonomy before committing the military order to Prussia.

Along with Germans, the kings of Hungary also settled Szeklers and Pechenegs in the region during the 12th and 13th centuries. Archaeological evidence for the same period also suggests a Romanian population inhabiting the villages later known as Şcheii Braşovului, Satulung, Baciu, Cernatu, and Turcheş (the former is today part of Braşov, while the latter four are today part of Săcele). In the second half of the 13th century the Romanian population is attested in two documents: in the region of Bran (1252) and Tohan (1294),cite book|author=Pascu, Ştefan|title=Voievodatul Transilvaniei, vol. II|year=1979|pages=p.441-494|language=Romanian] while in the second half of the 15th century out of nine villages from the domain of Bran seven were Romanian ("villae valachicales, Bleschdörfer") and only two German.

At the Conference of Lutsk in 1429, Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Hungary, suggested that the Teutonic Knights defend the region during the Ottoman wars in Europe. Led by Claus von Redewitz, a detachment of knights from Prussia was stationed in the Burzenland until half were killed during an Ottoman campaign in 1432.

20th century

Transylvanian Saxons remained in the Burzenland until the 20th century. Beginning in 1976, most of these Germans began to immigrate to West Germany with the approval of the Communist Romanian regime.cite journal|author=Vofkori László|coauthors=Lénárt Anna|title=Unităţi administrativ-teritoriale istorice şi regiuni etnografice în sudul şi estul Transilvaniei|journal=Acta Hargitensia III, Aluta XX|volume=2|pages=27–36|language=Romanian|year=1998. Introduction available on web: cite web|language=Romanian|url=http://www.cosys.ro/haromszek/siculica/acta98/ro/documente/vofkori.html|accessdate=2007-02-12|title=Unităţi administrativ-teritoriale istorice şi regiuni etnografice în sudul şi estul Transilvaniei. Introducere.]

Towns

In each case, the modern Romanian name is given first, followed by the historic German and Hungarian names.

* Apaţa ("Geist", "Apáca")
* Bod ("Brenndorf", "Botfalva")
* Bran ("Törzburg", "Törcsvár")
* Braşov ("Kronstadt", "Brassó")
* Codlea ("Zeiden", "Feketehalom")
* Cristian ("Neustadt", "Keresztényfalva")
* Crizbav ("Krebsbach", "Krizba")
* Dumbrăviţa ("Tsintsari", "Szunyogszek")
* Feldioara ("Marienburg", "Földvár")
* Ghimbav ("Weidenbach", "Vidombák")
* Hălchiu ("Heldsdorf", "Höltövény")
* Hărman ("Honigberg", "Szászhermány")
* Măieruş ("Nußbach", "Szászmagyarós")
* Prejmer ("Tartlau", "Prázsmar")
* Râşnov ("Rosenau", "Barcarozsnyó")
* Rotbav ("Rotbach", "Szászveresmart")
* Săcele ("Siebendörfer", "Szecseleváros / Négyfalu")
* Sânpetru ("Petersberg", "Barcaszentpéter")
* Şercaia ("Schirkanyen", "Sárkány")
* Vulcan ("Wolkendorf", " Szászvolkány")
* Zărneşti ("Zernescht", "Zernest")

References

See also

* Nösnerland
* Teutonic Knights
* Transylvanian Saxons

External links

* [http://www.karpatenwilli.com/komi7808.htm Peasants and castles of the Burzenland] de icon
* [http://www.siebenbuerger-sachsen-bw.de/buch/anhang/wappen/wappen/burzenla.jpgFormer coat of arms of the Burzenland]
* [http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~bgwiehle/siebenburgen/index.htm#1 Map showing German settlements in Transylvania]
* [http://www.inst.at/berge/perspektiven/viorel.htm German mountain names in Burzenland] de icon
* [http://www.eliznik.org.uk/RomaniaEthno/ Romanian ethnographical areas]
* [http://www.brasovtourism.com/index.php?task=event&event=shooting_the_rooster&lg=en Shooting the rooster - traditions of the Hungarian community from Ţara Bârsei]


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