List of cyberpunk works


List of cyberpunk works

The following is a list of works commonly ascribed to the cyberpunk genre of science fiction. While some of these works — such as "Neuromancer" and "Blade Runner" — have become accepted as archetypal examples of cyberpunk, the classification of others can be debated, or considered as examples of Postcyberpunk. Science-fiction theory, criticism, and fandom are all known for their contentious nature, just as SF writers are often celebrated for inventiveness. Consequently, all categorizations are likely to be incomplete, contested or provisional.

Several observers, including the SF writer David Brin, have commented that cyberpunk was not as original as the genre's boosters once claimed. Such works as Fritz Lang's movie "Metropolis" (1927) contain elements that a 21st-century viewer might call "cyberpunk", even though they predate the cyberpunk canon by many years. These works could be labeled cyberpunk's "precursors", but a causal connection is not always clear.

Furthermore, it should be noted that works published after 1993 are increasingly likely to be labeled "postcyberpunk", a term first applied to Stephenson's "Snow Crash."

Notable precursors to the genre

* E. M. Forster ("The Machine Stops", 1909)List fact|date=May 2008
* Aldous Huxley ("Brave New World", 1932)List fact|date=May 2008List fact|date=May 2008
* Bernard Wolfe ("Limbo", 1952)
* Alfred Bester ("The Stars My Destination (Tiger! Tiger!)", 1956)
* William S. Burroughs ("Naked Lunch", 1959, "The Soft Machine", 1961)List fact|date=May 2008
* Anthony Burgess ("A Clockwork Orange", 1962)
* Harry Harrison ("Make Room! Make Room!", 1966)List fact|date=May 2008
* Roger Zelazny ("Dream Master," 1966, which is an expansion of "He Who Shapes", 1965)
* Samuel R. Delany ("Nova," 1968)
* Philip K. Dick ("The Simulacra", 1964, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?," 1968 and several of his other works)
* Mick Farren ("The Texts of Festival", 1973)List fact|date=May 2008
* Thomas Pynchon ("Gravity's Rainbow", 1973)List fact|date=May 2008
* David Drake ("Lacey and His Friends", 1974)List fact|date=May 2008
* John Shirley ("City Come A-Walkin'", 1980)List fact|date=May 2008
* George Orwell ("Nineteen Eighty-Four", 1949)List fact|date=May 2008
* James Tiptree, Jr. ("The Girl Who Was Plugged In", 1974)
* John Brunner ("The Shockwave Rider", 1975)
* John Varley ("The Ophiuchi Hotline", 1977)List fact|date=May 2008
* John M. Ford ("Web of Angels", 1980)
* K. W. Jeter ("Dr. Adder", completed in 1972, but not published until 1984)List fact|date=May 2008
* Vernor Vinge ("True Names", 1981)

Print media

List of novels

* "The Artificial Kid" (1980) by Bruce Sterling
* "City Come A-Walkin'" (1980) by John Shirley
* "The Running Man" (1982) by Stephen King (as Richard Bachman)
* The Ware Tetralogy by Rudy Rucker
** "Software" (1982) by Rudy Rucker
** "Wetware" (1988) by Rudy Rucker
** "Freeware" (1997) by Rudy Rucker
** "Realware" (2000) by Rudy Rucker
* The Sprawl trilogy by William Gibson
** "Neuromancer" (1984) by William Gibson
** "Count Zero" (1986) by William Gibson
** "Mona Lisa Overdrive" (1988) by William Gibson
* "Schismatrix" (1985) by Bruce Sterling
* "Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World" (1985) by Haruki Murakami
* "Cybernetic Samurai" (1985) by Victor Milan
* "Eclipse Trilogy" (also called "A Song Called Youth Trilogy") by John Shirley
** "Eclipse" (1985)
** "Eclipse Penumbra" (1988)
** "Eclipse Corona" (1990)
* "Psion" (1985) by Joan D. Vinge (The Cat Novels)
** "Catspaw" (1988) by Joan D. Vinge
** "Dreamfall" (1996) by Joan D. Vinge
* "Hardwired" (1986) by Walter Jon Williams
** "Voice of the Whirlwind" (1987) by Walter Jon Williams
* "Vickers" (1986) by Mick Farren
* "When Gravity Fails" (1987) by George Alec Effinger
** "A Fire in the Sun" (1989) by George Alec Effinger
** "The Exile Kiss" (1991) by George Alec Effinger
* "Little Heroes" (1987) by Norman Spinrad
* "Mindplayers" (1987) by Pat Cadigan
* "Ambient" (1987) by Jack Womack (The Ambient Series)
** "Terraplane" (1988) by Jack Womack
** "Heathern" (1990) by Jack Womack
** "Elvissey" (1993) by Jack Womack
** "Random Acts of Senseless Violence" (1993) by Jack Womack
** "Let's Put the Future Behind Us" (1996) by Jack Womack
** "Going, Going, Gone" (2000) by Jack Womack
* "Deserted Cities of the Heart" (1988) by Lewis Shiner
* "Islands in the Net" (1988) by Bruce Sterling
* "The Long Orbit" (1988) by Mick Farren
* "The Continuing Time" by Daniel Keys Moran
** "Emerald Eyes" (1989) by Daniel Keys Moran
** "The Long Run" (1989) by Daniel Keys Moran
** "The Last Dancer" (1993) by Daniel Keys Moran
* "Slam" (1990) by Lewis Shiner
* "The Night Mayor" (1990) by Kim Newman
* "Mars-The Red Planet" (1990) by Mick Farren
* "Arachne" (1990) by Lisa Mason
** "Cyberweb" (1995) by Lisa Mason
* "The Difference Engine" (1991) by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling
* "Necrom" (1991) by Mick Farren
* "Bad Voltage" (1991) by Jonathan Littell
* "He, She and It" (1991) by Marge Piercy
* "Halo" (1991) by Tom Maddox
* "Synners" (1991) by Pat Cadigan
* "Fools" (1992) by Pat Cadigan
* "Snow Crash" (1992) by Neal Stephenson
* The Bridge trilogy by William Gibson
** "Virtual Light" (1993) by William Gibson
** "Idoru" (1996) by William Gibson
** "All Tomorrow's Parties" (1999) by William Gibson
* "Crashcourse" (1993) by Wilhelmina Baird
** "Clipjoint" (1994) by Wilhelmina Baird
** "Psykosis" (1995) by Wilhelmina Baird
* "Glimpses" (1993) by Lewis Shiner
* "Vurt" (1993) by Jeff Noon (Vurt Trilogy)
** "Pollen" (1995) by Jeff Noon
** "Nymphomation" (1995) by Jeff Noon
* "The Hacker and the Ants" (1994) by Rudy Rucker
* "Heavy Weather" (1994) by Bruce Sterling
* "Trouble and Her Friends" (1994) by Melissa Scott
* "Wildlife" (1994) by James Patrick Kelly
* "Virtual Death" (1995) by Shale Aaron
* "Fairyland" (1995) by Paul J. McAuley
* "Carlucci's Edge" (1995) by Richard Paul Russo
* "The Diamond Age" (1996) by Neal Stephenson
* "Holy Fire" (1996) by Bruce Sterling
* "Sewer, Gas & Electric" (1997) by Matt Ruff
* "Lucifer's Dragon" (1998) by Jon Courtenay Grimwood
* "Noir" (1998) by K. W. Jeter
* "Tea from an Empty Cup" (1998) by Pat Cadigan
* "Distraction" (1998) by Bruce Sterling
* "reMix" (1999) by Jon Courtenay Grimwood
* "redRobe" (2000) by Jon Courtenay Grimwood
* "Zeitgeist" (2000) by Bruce Sterling
* "The Zenith Angle" (2004) by Bruce Sterling
* "Altered Carbon" (2002) by Richard Morgan
* "Whole Wide World" (2002) by Paul J. McAuley
* "Blood Electric" (2002) by Kenji Siratori
* "Broken Angels" (2003) by Richard Morgan
* "Jennifer Government" (2003) by Max Barry
* "Market Forces" (2005) by Richard Morgan
* "Silver Screen" (2005) by Justine Robson
* "Hammerjack" (2005) by Marc D. Giller
** "Prodigal" (2006) by Marc D. Giller
* "Wired for Chaos" (2005) by Brett L. Renwick
* "Acidhuman Project" (2006) by Kenji Siratori
* "Cybernetica" (2006) by Michael J. Cavallaro
* "" (2007) by Lyan Thomas Huw
* "Pink Carbide" (2007) by E.S. Wynn
* "Looking Glass (2007) by James R. Strickland

List of short story anthologies

* "Burning Chrome" (1986) by William Ford Gibson
* "Mirrorshades -The Cyberpunk Anthology" (1986) edited by Bruce Sterling
* "Patterns" (1989) by Pat Cadigan
* "Crystal Express" (1989) by Bruce Sterling
* "Globalhead" (1992) by Bruce Sterling
* "Hackers" (1996) by Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois
* "A Good Old-Fashioned Future" (1999) by Bruce Sterling
* "Gnarl!" (2000) by Rudy Rucker
* "The Ultimate Cyberpunk" (2003) edited by Pat Cadigan

List of poetry

* "Gathered on This Beach - Poems & Perspectives for a Converging World" (2000) by Adrian McO-Campbell

List of graphic novels / comics

* "2020 Visions", by Jamie Delano
* "Deathlok the Demolisher" by Rich Buckler and Doug Moench
* "Akira" by Katsuhiro Otomo
* "Appleseed" by Masamune Shirow
* "" by Pepe Moreno
* "Battle Angel Alita" by Yukito Kishiro
* "BLAME!" by Tsutomu Nihei
* "Clover" by Clamp
* "Fate of the Blade" by Chris Sarracini
* "Ghost in the Shell" by Masamune Shirow
* "Judge Dredd" by John Wagner and Carlos Ezquerra
* "Kabuki" by David W. Mack
* "Lazarus Churchyard" by Warren Ellis
* "The Long Tomorrow" by Dan O'Bannon and Moebius
* "Marvel 2099" setting for various series of comics.
* "Ronin" by Frank Miller
* "Shatter" by Peter B. Gillis and Mike Saenz
* "" by Christopher Priest
* "Transmetropolitan" by Warren Ellis

List of conceptual design

* "OBLAGON" ISBN 4-06-201525-0 by Syd Mead
* "Sentury" ISBN 0-929463-09-9 by Syd Mead
* "Intron Depot" 1-4 by Masamune Shirow
* "futurhythm" by Range Murata
* "Robot" by Range Murata

List of non-fiction / critical studies

* "Profiles of the Future" (various editions) by Arthur C. Clarke
* "Storming the Reality Studio" (1991) by Larry McCaffery
* "" (1992) by Bruce Sterling
* "" (1995) by Katie Hafner & John Markoff
* "In The Beginning...Was The Command Line" (1999) by Neal Stephenson
* "Cyberpunk and Cyberculture" (2000) by Dani Cavallaro
* "" (2002), ed. Darren Tofts, Annemarie Jonson, and Alessio Cavellaro.
* "" (2003) by Sabine Heuser.

Audiovisual media

Notable film precursors

* "Metropolis" (1926)
* "Alphaville" (1965)
* "Westworld" (1974)
* "Rollerball" (1975)
* "Eraserhead" (1977)

List of cyberpunk films

"Note: most of the films listed are cyberpunk-related either through narrative or by thematic context."
* "Blade Runner" (1982)
* "Liquid Sky" (1982)
* "Videodrome" (1983)
* "Brainstorm" (1983)
* "Overdrawn At the Memory Bank" (1983) — a film which gained wider viewership thanks to its appearance on the eighth season of "Mystery Science Theater 3000"
* "Cherry 2000 (1987)
* "RoboCop" (1987)
** "RoboCop 2" (1990)
** "RoboCop 3" (1993)
* "The Running Man" (1987)
* "Akira" (1988 anime)
* "" (1989)
** "" (1992)
* "Cyborg" (1989)
** "Cyborg 2" (1993)
** "" (1995)
* "Total Recall" (1990)
* "Circuitry Man" (1990)
* "Hardware M.A.R.K.13" (1990)
* "Mindwarp" (1990)
* "964 Pinocchio" (1991)
* "Until the End of the World" (1991)
* "Freejack" (1992)
* "The Lawnmower Man" (1992)
** "" (1996)
* "" (1993)
* "" (1993)
* "Battle Angel Alita" (1993 anime)
* "Fortress" (1993)
** "Fortress 2" (1999)
* "Ghost in the Machine" (1993)
* "Acción mutante" (1993)
* "Nemesis" (1993)
** "" (1995)
* "Brainscan" (1994)
* "Macross Plus" (1994 anime)
* "Hologram Man" (1995)
* "Johnny Mnemonic" (1995)
* "Judge Dredd" (1995)
* "Virtuosity" (1995)
* "Strange Days" (1995)
* "Ghost in the Shell" (1995 anime)
** "" (2004 anime)
* "Menno's Mind" (1996)
* "Virtual Combat" (1996)
* "" (1997 anime)
* "Nirvana" (1998)
* "New Rose Hotel" (1998)
* "eXistenZ" (1999)
* "The Thirteenth Floor" (1999)
* "The Matrix" (1999)
** "The Animatrix" (2003)
** "The Matrix Reloaded" (2003)
** "The Matrix Revolutions" (2003)
* "The 6th Day" (2000)
* "" (2001)
* "Avalon" (2001)
* "Electric Dragon 80.000V" (2001)
* "Minority Report" (2002)
* "Impostor" (2002)
* "Cypher" (2002)
* "BLAME! Ver 0.11" (2002 anime)
* "Natural City" (2003)
* "Paycheck" (2003)
* "Appleseed" (2004 anime)
* "Avatar" (2004)
* "Immortel (Ad Vitam)" (2004)
* "Paranoia 1.0" (2004) (aka "One Point O")
* "Casshern" (2004)
* "Gamebox 1.0" (2004)
* "Æon Flux" (2005)
* "A Scanner Darkly" (2006)
* "Renaissance" (2006)
* "Ultraviolet" (2006)
* "The Gene Generation" (2007)
* "Vexille" (2007 anime)
* "Babylon A.D." (2008)
* "Repo! The Genetic Opera" (2008)

List of films borrowing some cyberpunk elements

* "Alien" (1979), "Aliens" (1986), "Alien³" (1992), and "" (1997) — more horror/sci-fi related, however the environment, people and narratives portray a cyberpunk attitude. Also there are direct references which have inspired the Rivet Industrial culture, especially from the third sequel.
* "Heavy metal" (1981)
* "Escape from New York" (1981)
** "Escape from L.A." (1996)
* "Tron" (1982) — perhaps more of a technology-themed fantasy. "Tron" does involve a hacker physically entering the world of cyberspace, a realm full of video games (fittingly, since video games were Gibson's inspiration behind his cyberspace concept). However, the movie's world is not dark or dystopian nor its corporation evil; arguably, one could retroactively designate "Tron" postcyberpunk.
* "Runaway"
* "Brazil" (1985)
* "Back to the Future Part II" (1989)
* "Sneakers" (1992) — perhaps better categorized as a technothriller or mathematical science fiction
* "Universal Soldier" (1992)
* "Demolition Man" (1993)
* "" (1993) a special set in an alternative future with androids, post-apocalyptic cityscapes and timetravel.
* "Hackers" (1994)
* "Sci-Fighters" (1996)
* "Space Truckers" (1996)
* "Gattaca" (1997) — an SF film noir, this movie's emphasis on genetic engineering over computer technology might make "biopunk" a better term. It also includes a motif of space travel.
* "The Fifth Element" (1997)
* "Cube" (1997)
** "" (2002)
** "Cube Zero" (2004)
* "Cowboy Bebop" (1998) a space western setting with themes relating to biopunk and cyberpunk, such as genetic modification, cybernetics and hackers, and a film noir way of storytelling.
* "Soldier" (1998)
* "Ichi the Killer" (2001)
* "Code 46" (2003) — also biopunk
* "" (2004). The designs of Gigan, the Xilians and their technology show cyberpunk influences.
* "Final Fantasy VII Advent Children" (2004)
* "I, Robot" (2004)
* "Firefly/Serenity" (2005) a space western with elements of cyberpunk and biopunk.
* "The Island" (2005)
* "Children of Men"(2006)It is interesting to note that the more recent "Star Trek" movies, particularly "" (1996) and "Star Trek Nemesis" (2002), draw upon cyberpunk themes: malevolent cyborgs in the first case and malevolent clones in the second. Oddly, the Borg — arguably the most widely recognized cybernetic organisms in popular culture — originated as space opera villains in a distant-future story, not as characters from a dystopian near-future Earth. This may serve as a testament to the difficulty of categorizing science fiction.

Documentary films

* "Cyberpunk" (1990)
* "Cyberpunk Educator" (2003)

List of TV series

Note that TV series, by their very nature, can incorporate stories from a variety of different genres. For example, the original "Star Trek" included episodes of military science fiction ("Balance of Terror"), comedy ("The Trouble with Tribbles") and character-driven SF drama ("Is There in Truth No Beauty?"). It is therefore debatable whether an entire series can be classified as "cyberpunk" (or as any other SF sub-genre) based on a subset of its episodes. Furthermore, according to Lawrence Person's postcyberpunk thesis, writers since the mid-1990s have been incorporating cyberpunk tropes into their SF simply because those tropes are familiar — the same way a writer who grew up reading Asimov's Foundation series would write space opera stories full of hyperspatial Jumps. This behavior leads, presumably, to works which include cyberpunk themes in less dystopian contexts, with a wider variety of characters (not just razorgirls and burnt-out, drug-addicted hackers), and embracing other SF settings. The new series of Doctor Who includes episodes with cyberpunk influence, especially End of the World, The Long Game, Bad Wolf, The Parting of the Ways, New Earth, Fear Her and Rise of the Cybermen/Age of Steel. Cyberpunk is also an influence in Torchwood, a spin-off of Doctor Who set in Cardiff. Joss Whedon's "Firefly" series might be a good example: while its overall form is a "space western", individual episodes deal with human beings used as black-market organ carriers and with malevolent megacorps.
* "Æon Flux"
* "Batman Beyond"
* "Century City"
* "Charlie Jade"
* "Code Lyoko"
* "Cyber City Oedo 808"
* "Cyborg 009"
* "Dark Angel"
* ""
* "Harsh Realm"
* "Max Headroom"
* "ReBoot"
* "Spiderman Unlimited"
* "TekWar"
* "Time Trax"
* "Torchwood"
* "Total Recall 2070"
* "VR.5"
* "Wild Palms"

List of anime

* ".hack": A series of games, manga, and anime about an online, massively-multiplayed fantasy role playing game.
* "A.D. Police": After earthquake Tokyo setting with a battle over stolen “Boomers."
* "Akira": A biker given psychic powers in a Post-Apocalyptic setting.
* "Armitage III": Two cops, one human one “third type robot” trying to stop robot murders.
* "Appleseed": Focus is on the urban cyberpunk conflict in a post World War III environment
* "Battle Angel Alita"
* "Blame!": A 6-part version of short OVA's, based on the manga-series. Each OVA shows animated flashes of scenes from the manga. A silent gunman makes his way through the dark halls of an ever-growing megastructure.
* "Bubblegum Crisis": Fight by the Knight Sabers against android-like “Boomers” controlled by a corporate conglomerate.
* "Bubblegum Crisis Tokyo 2040": a 90s remake of the previous, with 26 episodes and a much more complex plot and meaning.
* "Cowboy Bebop": While not the show's primary message, adverse effects of technology on humanity (such as the destruction of Earth and human experimentation) are shown throughout the show's 26 episodes and accompanying feature-length film
*"Cyber City Oedo 808"
* "Eatman": a TV and OAV series featuring Bolt Crunk, a bounty hunter in a futuristic setting able to eat metal and produce various tech devices, mostly weapons.
* "Ergo Proxy"
* "Gankutsuou": Based on "The Count of Monte Cristo", but set in another world with both cyberpunk and steampunk elements.
* "Ghost in the Shell": Do cyborgs still retain their human side? And just what does it mean to be human anyway? Cybernetically enhanced cops try to track down Puppet Master.
* "": What does technology do to society?
* ""
* "Metropolis": The main plot concentrates on a “Puppet Master” for the cyborgs, just like the hunt for one in Ghost in the Shell.
* "Serial Experiments Lain": (1998) – A Middle School Student’s journey into "The Wired."
* "Silent Möbius": Attacked Mystification Police Department has to protect post-Silent Crisis Tokyo. The Police are enhanced in order to fight “Lucifer Hawk,” beings from a parallel world.
* "Texhnolyze": takes place in an underground city called Lux which is aggressively controlled by three rival gangs, all who are "texhnolyzed".
* "Wolf's Rain": takes place in a post-apocalyptic time when much of the world has been ecologically devastated in a form of fimbulwinter and most people live in poverty.

List of bands and solo artists

This list includes various bands or solo artists inspired by cyberpunk across their careers, or during single projects.

Bands
*Angelspit: Hardcore Australian based cyberpunk duoList fact|date=May 2008
*Alter EgoList fact|date=May 2008
*Apoptygma BerzerkList fact|date=May 2008
*Atari Teenage Riot: "Digital hardcore" music fusing punk, electronic and noise elements with strong political overtones.List fact|date=May 2008
*Aural Vampire: Japanese cyber pop driven by gothic imagery.List fact|date=May 2008
*The Cassandra Complex: Industrial/EBM/goth/synthpop crossover band formed in the mid-80s who released an album called "Cyberpunx" in 1990.List fact|date=May 2008
*Celldweller: Industrial rock with elements of metalcore, dance and techno.List fact|date=May 2008
*Cenobita: Cyberpunk Industrial music, with gothic elements, from MexicoList fact|date=May 2008
*Chemlab: Electro/Rock/Coldwave/Industrial with cyberpunk lyrical content.List fact|date=May 2008
*Chrome: An early industrial/post-punk band with cyberpunk themes and lyrical content.List fact|date=May 2008
*Clock DVAList fact|date=May 2008
*Combichrist EBM/industrial act. List fact|date=May 2008
*Course of Empire: Industrial/Alternative rock group from Texas with lyrics touching on technological, mystical and dystopian themes.List fact|date=May 2008
*Dope Stars Inc.: Industrial/Punk group from Italy. Self-proclaimed "New Breed of Digital Fuckers". This group also has an album called "Neuromance".
*Epoxies: a new wave and punk band with synthetic sounds and themes about clones, cyborgs, future society and mass destruction in a tongue-in-cheek manner.
*Fear Factory: Industrial-tinged heavy metal (originally death metal) utilising samples from cyberpunk films; lyrical content often hints at dark future for mankind, with several references to the "Terminator movies".
*Front 242: Belgian industrial band heavily influenced by science fiction and synthetic sounds.
*Front Line Assembly: Famous and influential industrial band with strong cyberpunk lyrical content and themes. Many of their songs include samples from various cyberpunk themed movies.
*Future Sound of London: Produced and created albums "ISDN" and "Dead Cities", both composed with varying degrees of cyberpunk themes and influences.
*God Lives Underwater: Heavily computer synthesized rock, featured on the soundtrack to "Johnny Mnemonic."
*Goteki: EBM band, considered by many as 'cybergoth'.
*Gridlock: Plays "noize" music.
*Haujobb: EBM/Industrial with cyberpunk themes and lyrical content. This German band's name is derived from the term "skinjob", "Blade Runner"''s slang for android.
*Information Society: Various cyberpunk influenced works, most notably the track "Mirrorshades" on the album "Hack" which is about the character Molly from William Gibson's Sprawl trilogy.
* KMFDM an industrial metal/rock band, with cyberpunk influences, they are known for their strong political and anti-goverment, revolutionary lyrics. Also featured on the Johnny Mnemonicsoundtrack.
*Kraftwerk: One of the first bands to embrace synthesizers. Their live act includes four robotic alter egos of the band members.
*Left Spine Down: (also known by the acronym LSD) plays a style of music they refer to as iPunk fusing the sounds of Industrial, Metal, Punk and Drum & Bass. They also incorporate many Cyberpunk related themes lyrically and image wise.
*Luca Turilli's Dreamquest: Futurist/electronic sci-fi metal set in a distant future
*Machinae Supremacy: A Swedish Metal/Bitpop band with cyberpunk lyrical content.
*Meat Beat Manifesto: Founded by Jack Dangers, Highly intricate ambient acid breaks, many dystopic and counter cultural themes notable tracks include: "I am Electro", "Acid Again", and "Prime Audio Soup" the later of which was featured in The Matrix
*Nine Inch Nails: The "NiN" album "Year Zero" has strong cyberpunk themes.
*Noisia: Neurofunk, synthetic jungle music.
*Orbital: Heavy use of synthesizers and depersonalized lyrics. Tracks used in cyberpunk media such as "Pi", "Johnny Mnemonic", and "Wipeout".
*Orgy: Los Angeles band with sounds of alternative/synth rock and self-described "electro-pop" or "death-pop". Their second album "Vapor Transmission" (2000) is most heavily considered as a form of cyberpunk.
*Pitchshifter: A British band who's albums became increasingly influenced by cyberpunk.
*Plasma Pool: Dark ambient
*Pop Will Eat Itself: British rock group in the late 1980s that traded heavily on cyberpunk themes by combining electronics and sampling with a tongue-in-cheek glam rock persona, headed by electronic composer Clint Mansell. They later took on a more industrial sound in the early '90s. Their merchandise, featuring graphics styled after corporate logos, was nearly as popular as the music they produced.
*Powerman 5000: an alternative metal band which featured heavy cyberpunk themes and imagery on their album "Tonight the Stars Revolt!". In the past, they have also been known to perform in clothing inspired by the cyberpunk science fiction genre.
*Psykosonik: Paul Sebastien and Daniel Lenz band with cyberpunk themes. Many references to William Gibson's novels. For example: the song title "Dreaming Real" was taken from a line in Neuromancer.
*Red Harvest: A Norwegian industrial/prog-metal band incorporating cyberpunk imagery and lyrical content.
*Sigue Sigue Sputnik
*Sonic Youth: The 1988 album "Daydream Nation" was heavily inspired by writer William Gibson's Sprawl trilogy.
*Terminal Power Company: British Cyberpunk/industrial exponents. Supreme Cyberpunk movie samplers.
*Velvet Acid Christ: Plays in the style of electro-industrial.
*Vennaskond: Estonian cyberpunk, particularly their albums "Warszawianka" and "Võluri Tagasitulek."
*Vision Divine: Power metal. Cyberpunk only on the album "The Perfect Machine". Is set in the future where humans learn how to make themselves into immortal robots.
*VNV Nation: Plays futurepop.
*Voivod: A thrash/progressive metal band whose lyrics usually contain a scifi edge especially on late 80's releases such as "Nothingface"
*White Zombie: . Both the title and title-tracks feature strong cyberpunk imaginary, while its hit-single More Human Than Human is about the Blade Runner movie.
*Zeromancer: Their first two albums, "Clone Your Lover" and "Eurotrash", evoke a distinctly cyberpunk atmosphere, as do the videos produced during this period. The music itself can be described as a fusion of industrial metal and synthpop.

Solo artists
*Anthony Rother: Kraftwerk-inspired electro synths and frequent use of vocoded lyrics about the relationship between humans and computer technology.List fact|date=May 2008
*Aphex Twin (Richard David James): Electronic music artist residing in the UK, Aphex Twin fuses ambiance, drum & bass, and acid styles of electronica. Songs like "Green Calx" and "Vordhosbn" convey a cyberpunk style.List fact|date=May 2008
*Billy Idol: while traditionally a pop-rock musician, Idol's 1993 "Cyberpunk" concept album was Idol's attempt to introduce the cyberpunk subculture to a mainstream audience. Inspired by the cyberpunk fiction and cyberculture of the late 80s and early 90s, multiple album tracks include lyrics referencing cyberpunk themes. [ [http://www.chaoscontrol.com/content_article.php?article=billyidol Billy Idol interview] with Chaos Control, on "Cyberpunk", 1993.]
*Dieselboy Hard Drum-n-Bass DJ.
*Ellen Allien: Synthetic sounds, lyrics oriented on a futuristic unified Berlin. Track names include "Send" and "Data Romance".
*Gary Numan: New Wave artist who borrows themes from cyberpunk, making music which is predominantly cyber-related.
*Ken Ishii: Japanese trance artist many notably 'futuristic' tracks on album Future in Light.
*Kid 606: Is one of the few artists that operate within cyberpunk both formally and functionally; using a DIY punk ethos (as exemplified in his Tigerbeat6 label) as well as harnessing contemporary technology in production and distribution.
*Lassigue Bendthaus: Techno/IDM with futuristic cyberpunk themes.
*Trentemøller: Dj and producer of electronic music.
*T. Raumschmiere
*Uberzone Nu skool breaks act, highly futuristic, albums include Faith in the Future and Ideology.
*Vitalic: Emphasizes that all of the instruments used are fake and are produced from a synthesizer.

Music labels
*Hangars Liquides: Flashcore - cybercore

List of computer and video games

* "Anachronox"
* "A Mind Forever Voyaging"
* "B.A.T. (Bureau of Astral Troubleshooters)"
** "The Koshan Conspiracy"
* "Beneath a Steel Sky"
* "Blade Runner"
* "BloodNet"
* ""
* ""
* "Circuit's Edge"
* "Chaos Overlords"
* "Chaser"
* "Cybersphere"
* "Deus Ex"
** ""
** ""
* "Devastation
* "Dreamweb"
* "" (Stark only)
* "Dystopia"
* "Enter the Matrix"
** ""
*"Final Fantasy VI"
*"Final Fantasy VII"
* ""
** "Fade to Black"
* "Ghost in the Shell"
** ""
* "Half-Life"
* "Half-Life 2"
** ""
** ""
* ""
* ""
* "The Longest Journey" (Stark only)
* "Megami Tensei"
* "MegaRace"
* "Metal Gear" series [ [http://www.cyberpunkreview.com/movie/style/awesome-cyberpunk-visuals/metal-gear-solid/ Metal Gear Solid] ]
* ""
* "Mirror's Edge"
* "The Moment of Silence"
* "Neocron"
* "Neuromancer"
* ""
* ""
* "Oni"
* "Paradise Cracked"
* "Perfect Dark"
** "Perfect Dark Zero"
* "Policenauts"
* "Quarantine"
* "Quake" (series)
* "Red Faction"
** "Red Faction II"
* "Rez"
* "Rise of the Dragon"
* "Septerra Core"
* "Shadowrun" (SNES)
** "Shadowrun" (Sega)
** "Shadowrun" (Mega CD)
** "Shadowrun (Xbox 360 and Windows PC)"
* "Shin Megami Tensei
** "Shin Megami Tensei II
** "
** "
* "Syndicate"
** "Syndicate Wars"
* "System Shock"
** "System Shock 2"
* "Snatcher"
* "Soul Hackers"
* "Total Recall"
* "Tron 2.0"
* "Uplink"
* "Wipeout" Cyberpunk racing franchise
* "X-Kaliber 2097"

List of massive online computer games

* "Anarchy Online"
* "Entropia Universe"
* "Face of Mankind"
* ""
* "Neocron"
* "The Matrix Online"

References

External links

* [http://project.cyberpunk.ru/lib/ "Cyberpunk Library"] - Library of stories @ Cyberpunk Information Databes Project
* [http://www.cyberpunkreview.com "Cyberpunk Review"] - Detailed reviews and screencaps for all cyberpunk films and anime
* [http://project.cyberpunk.ru/idb/scifi.html "Cyberpunk Information Database"] - Original resource material from [http://project.cyberpunk.ru "The Cyberpunk Project"]
* [http://cyberpunk.omou.net "Duke of Hell's Cyberpunk"] - Listing of cyberpunk-related media
* [http://home.btconnect.com/buckleburyweb/innervation/ "Innervation"] - resource site for designers interested in technological themes
* [http://www.ishkur.com/music/ Ishkur's Guide to Electronic Music] - opinionated and irreverent historical overview of electronic music, with sound samples for many sub-genres


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