Positron annihilation spectroscopy


Positron annihilation spectroscopy

Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) [Positrons in Solids, P. Hautojaervi, Topics in Current Physics 12 Springer Heidelberg 1979] or Positron lifetime spectroscopy is a non-destructive spectroscopy technique to study voids and defects in solids.

The technique relies on the fact that a positron that comes in the immediate vicinity of an electron will cease to exist by annihilation. In the annihilation process of a positron and the electron gamma photons are set free that can be detected. If positrons are injected into a solid body their lifetime will strongly depend on whether they end up in a region with high electron density or in a void where electrons are scarce or absent. In the latter case the lifetime can be much longer because the probability to run into an electron is much lower.

By comparing the fraction of positrons that have a longer lifetime to those that annihilate quickly one can therefore gain insight in the voids or the defects of the structure. In the case of materials with a lattice structure like semiconductors this can be a dislocation or some other lattice defect. In the case of amorphous polymers this might the the free volume between the chains of the polymer.

The technique requires a source of positrons. A radioactive isotope of sodium is often used.

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy — is a technique in material science used for studying the types and concentrations of atomic sized defects in materials. Positron Sources Typically positrons are produced through Beta Decay. A typical source would be 22Na, sodium 22. Positron… …   Wikipedia

  • Positron — Infobox Particle bgcolour = name = Positron (antielectron) caption = num types = composition = Elementary particle family = Fermion group = Lepton generation = First interaction = Gravity, Electromagnetic, Weak antiparticle = Electron theorized …   Wikipedia

  • List of materials analysis methods — List of materials analysis methods: Contents: Top · 0–9 · A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z μSR see Muon spin spectroscopy …   Wikipedia

  • PAS — or Pas may refer to: Contents 1 Automotive 2 Companies 3 Medicine 4 Organizations 5 Places …   Wikipedia

  • Alliage Métallique Amorphe — Alliage métallique amorphe. Un alliage métallique amorphe, appelé aussi « métal amorphe », est un alliage métallique solide doté d une structure amorphe plutôt que cristalline. Ces matériaux peuvent être obtenus par refroidissement très …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Alliage metallique amorphe — Alliage métallique amorphe Alliage métallique amorphe. Un alliage métallique amorphe, appelé aussi « métal amorphe », est un alliage métallique solide doté d une structure amorphe plutôt que cristalline. Ces matériaux peuvent être… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Alliage métallique amorphe — Alliage métallique amorphe. Pièces d un alliage …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Metal amorphe — Alliage métallique amorphe Alliage métallique amorphe. Un alliage métallique amorphe, appelé aussi « métal amorphe », est un alliage métallique solide doté d une structure amorphe plutôt que cristalline. Ces matériaux peuvent être… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Métal amorphe — Alliage métallique amorphe Alliage métallique amorphe. Un alliage métallique amorphe, appelé aussi « métal amorphe », est un alliage métallique solide doté d une structure amorphe plutôt que cristalline. Ces matériaux peuvent être… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Verre metallique — Alliage métallique amorphe Alliage métallique amorphe. Un alliage métallique amorphe, appelé aussi « métal amorphe », est un alliage métallique solide doté d une structure amorphe plutôt que cristalline. Ces matériaux peuvent être… …   Wikipédia en Français


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.