Whoop-Up


Whoop-Up

Infobox Musical
name= Whoop-Up
subtitle=


caption= Page from sheet music (cropped)
music= Mark Charlap
lyrics= Norman Gimbel
book= Cy Feuer and Ernest Martin
basis=”Stay Away, Joe” by Dan Cushman
productions= 1958 Broadway
awards=

"Whoop-Up" is a musical with a music by Mark Charlap, lyrics by Norman Gimbel, and book by Cy Feuer and Ernest Martin, based on “Stay Away, Joe” by Dan Cushman. It was directed by Cy Feuer, with settings and lighting by Jo Mielziner and choreography by Onna White. Produced by Feuer and Martin, the Broadway production, opened on December 22, 1958 at the Shubert Theatre, where it ran for 56 performances. Cast included Sylvia Sims, Paul Ford, Susan Johnson, and Romo Vincent.


=Songs=col-begincol-2Act I
* Glenda’s Place
* When the Tall Man Talks
* Nobody Throw Those Bull
* Rocky Boy Ceremonial
* Love Eyes
* Men
* Never Before
* Caress Me, Possess Me Perfume
* Flattery
* The Girl In His Arms
*The Best of What This Country’s GotAct II
* I Wash My Hands
* Quarrel-tet
* Sorry for Myself
* ‘Til the Big Fat Moon Falls Down
* What I Mean to Say
* Montana
* She or Her

External links

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • whoop — [hwo͞op, wo͞op, ho͞op] n. [ME houpen, to call, shout, echoic (or < ? OFr houper, to call afar off, cry out)] a loud shout, cry, or noise; specif., a) a shrill and prolonged cry, as of excitement, exultation, ferocity, etc. b) a hoot, as of an… …   English World dictionary

  • Whoop — Whoop, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Whooped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Whooping}.] [OE. houpen. See {Hoop}, v. i.] [1913 Webster] 1. To utter a whoop, or loud cry, as eagerness, enthusiasm, or enjoyment; to cry out; to shout; to halloo; to utter a war whoop; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • whoop — whoop; whoop·er; whoop·la; whoop·ee; …   English syllables

  • whoop — ► NOUN 1) a loud cry of joy or excitement. 2) a long rasping indrawn breath. ► VERB ▪ give or make a whoop. ● whoop it up Cf. ↑whoop it up ORIGIN probably imitative …   English terms dictionary

  • Whoop — Whoop, n. 1. A shout of pursuit or of war; a very of eagerness, enthusiasm, enjoyment, vengeance, terror, or the like; an halloo; a hoot, or cry, as of an owl. [1913 Webster] A fox, crossing the road, drew off a considerable detachment, who… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • whoop-de-do — [ˌwu:p di: ˈdu:, ˌhu:p ] interjection AmE spoken [Date: 1900 2000; Origin: Perhaps from whoop + to do] used to show that you do not think something that someone has told you is as exciting or impressive as they think it is ▪ He says he ll give me …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • whoop — [wu:p, hu:p] v [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: houpper, from the sound.] 1.) to shout loudly and happily ▪ Hundreds of people ran past them, whooping joyously. 2.) whoop it up [i]informal to enjoy yourself very much, especially in a large …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • whoop — (v.) mid 14c., houpen, partly imitative, partly from O.Fr. houper to cry out, also imitative. It is attested as an interjection from at least mid 15c. The noun is recorded from c.1600. Extended form whoopee is attested from 1845, originally… …   Etymology dictionary

  • whoop-de-do — ☆ whoop de do or whoop de doo [hwo͞opdē do͞o′, wo͞opdē do͞o′ho͞opdē do͞o′ ] n. [extended < WHOOP] Informal noisy or excited activity, commotion, or fuss; hoopla, ballyhoo, to do, etc …   English World dictionary

  • whoop it up — {v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To make a loud noise; have a noisy celebration; enjoy yourself noisily. * /The team whooped it up after winning the game./ 2. To praise something enthusiastically; encourage enthusiasm or support. Often used with for . *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • whoop it up — {v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To make a loud noise; have a noisy celebration; enjoy yourself noisily. * /The team whooped it up after winning the game./ 2. To praise something enthusiastically; encourage enthusiasm or support. Often used with for . *… …   Dictionary of American idioms


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