Conservative Evangelicalism


Conservative Evangelicalism

:"For conservative political views within Christianity, see Christian right.":"For conservative theological views within Christianity, see Conservative christian"Conservative Evangelicalism is a term used to describe a theological movement found within Protestant Evangelical Christianity, politically to describe the Christian right, or is sometimes simply synonymous with Evangelical. While the term is used more often in the first sense in the UK [cite book | last = Barclay | first = Oliver | authorlink = Oliver Barclay | title = Evangelicalism in Britain 1935-1995 | publisher = Inter-Varsity_Press | location = Leicester | date = 1997 | pages = 12ff., 114f., 124f., 127, 133 | isbn = 0-85111-189-0 ] , the other references are not unknown. In the US the term is used more often in the political sense, or the broader sense of simply Evangelical. Whereas in Australia the term Evangelical itself can be used to carry a sense of theologically Conservative over against Charismatic distinctives. This article is about the theological Conservative movement within Evangelicalism.

Whilst as a theological movement it has a number of similarities with Fundamentalist Christianity, conservative evangelicals typically reject that label and are keen to maintain their distinct identity, which is strongly Reformed. In this sense, Conservative Evangelicalism can be thought to be distinct from Liberal Evangelicalism, Open Evangelicalism and Charismatic Evangelicalism [ [http://www.fulcrum-anglican.org.uk/news/2003/20030930watercourses.cfm?doc=2#a1 Canal, River and Rapids: Contemporary Evangelicalism in the Church of England] - Fulcrum post about Evangelicalism, which contains an outline of Conservative Evangelicalism in A.1] .

History

Before the war

By the 1930s, the term conservative evangelical was being used in distinction to Liberal evangelical. The points of distinction largely being that while Liberal Evangelicals "maintain some of the other typical evangelical emphases, do not maintain, and often repudiate, the total reliability of the Bible and usually do not preach substitutionary atonement, even if they stress the cross in a doctrinally undefined way." [cite book | last = Barclay | first = Oliver | authorlink = Oliver Barclay | title = Evangelicalism in Britain 1935-1995 | publisher = Inter-Varsity_Press | location = Leicester | date = 1997 | pages = 12 | isbn = 0-85111-189-0 ] Movements like the Anglican Evangelical Group Movement and the Student Christian Movement could be described as Liberal Evangelical, the former organization glad of the title "Liberal Evangelical". Organizations such as the Bible Churchman's Missionary Society and the Inter-Varsity Fellowship of Evangelicals Unions (now UCCF) were distinctively Conservative Evangelical in the Anglican and university spheres respectively [cite book | last = Barclay | first = Oliver | authorlink = Oliver Barclay | title = Evangelicalism in Britain 1935-1995 | publisher = Inter-Varsity_Press | location = Leicester | date = 1997 | pages = 13 | isbn = 0-85111-189-0 ] .

The Conservative Evangelical movement was small, and as such largely defensive. In part because "In academic circles it was almost universally assumed that a CE view of the Bible was dead." [cite book | last = Barclay | first = Oliver | authorlink = Oliver Barclay | title = Evangelicalism in Britain 1935-1995 | publisher = Inter-Varsity_Press | location = Leicester | date = 1997 | pages = 16 | isbn = 0-85111-189-0 ] The Keswick Convention, which would later have a very significant role in the shaping of Conservative Evangelicalism in the UK was a small outpost of Evangelicalism still thoroughly committed to the sufficiency and authority of the Bible [cite book | last = Barclay | first = Oliver | authorlink = Oliver Barclay | title = Evangelicalism in Britain 1935-1995 | publisher = Inter-Varsity_Press | location = Leicester | date = 1997 | pages = 35 | isbn = 0-85111-189-0 ] .

1960s

A key event in the development of British conservative evangelicalism was the 1966 National Assembly of Evangelicals, a convention organised by the Evangelical Alliance. Martyn Lloyd-Jones made an unexpected call for evangelicals to unite together as evangelicals and no longer within their 'mixed' denominations. This view was motivated by a belief that true Christian fellowship requires evangelical views on central topics such as the atonement and the inspiration of Scripture. The meeting was chaired by Anglican evangelical John Stott. Lloyd Jones and Stott were the two leading figures within the conservative evangelical movement at that time, Lloyd Jones being a key figure to many in the Free Churches and Stott likewise amongst evangelical Anglicans. The two leaders clashed spectacularly as Stott, though not down as a speaker that night, used his role to publicly disparage Lloyd-Jones, saying that his opinion went against history and the Bible.

The following year saw the first National Evangelical Anglican Congress, which was held at Keele University. At this conference, largely due to Stott's influence, evangelical Anglicans committed themselves to full participation in the Church of England, rejecting the separationist approach proposed by Lloyd-Jones. [cite news
last = Cook
first = Paul
date = 2007-02
url = http://www.evangelical-times.org/Website_Pages/ArticleDetail.php?articleID=2166
title = Evangelicalism in the UK
publisher = Evangelical Times
accessdate = 2007-08-30
]

These two conferences effectively fixed the direction of a large part of the British evangelical community. Although there is an ongoing debate as to the exact nature of Lloyd-Jones's views, they undoubtedly caused the two groupings to adopt diametrically opposed positions. These positions, and the resulting split, continue largely unchanged to this day. [cite news
last = Gibson
first = Alan
date = 1996-10
url = http://www.e-n.org.uk/217-Thirty-years-of-hurt.htm
title = Thirty Years Of Hurt?
publisher = Evangelicals Now
accessdate = 2007-08-30
]

1970s

From the war up until the 1960s Conservative Evangelicals had been less of a distinct group within Evangelicalism than they had before the war. The contributions, during the war, of CS Lewis to the Evangelical cause helped to blend the lines between Conservative Evangelicals and others committed to Evangelical distinctives from outside the movement. The stand taken by Stott and Lloyd-Jones against the Liberalization of Christianity in the 60s, meant that the biggest disagreements between Evangelicals were over how to maintain Evangelical distinctives in the light of the increasing shift of the major denominations toward Liberalism. However, there were distinctions and disagreements within Evangelicalism that went beyond this. With the dawn of the 70s Evangelicals "where less united than they had been on church policies and on some theological issues." [cite book | last = Barclay | first = Oliver | authorlink = Oliver Barclay | title = Evangelicalism in Britain 1935-1995 | publisher = Inter-Varsity_Press | location = Leicester | date = 1997 | pages = 16 | isbn = 0-85111-189-0 ] One of the most significant of which was the rise of the relatively young Charismatic movement, which saw the importation of some of what had previously been Pentecostal distinctives into the other mainline Protestant denominations (but at this stage, largely within the Evangelical constituency). The impact of this movement was so large that "By the 1970s, it was said, the majority of younger evangelicals in the Church of England were charismatic in outlook." [cite book | last = Murray | first = Iain H. | authorlink = Iain Murray | title = Evangelicalism Divided, A Record of Crucial Change in the Years 1950-2000 | publisher = Banner of Truth Trust | location = Edinburgh | date = 2000 | pages = 135 | isbn = 0-85151-783-8 ]

The Conservative Evangelical movement can now be said to have a clearer definition over against Charismaticism. But the two movements could never be clearly separated as "Many congregations included a charismatic element... This was partly because the more extreme groups tended to leave and form their own congregations, and partly because a charismatic element was more often accepted as a possible constituent of a broader fellowship, even by those who did not share its (sic) emphases." [cite book | last = Barclay | first = Oliver | authorlink = Oliver Barclay | title = Evangelicalism in Britain 1935-1995 | publisher = Inter-Varsity_Press | location = Leicester | date = 1997 | pages = 104 | isbn = 0-85111-189-0 ]

Organisations

Affiliations and Groups

* Reform is an association of conservative evangelical Anglican churches
* The Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches is a British association of mostly conservative evangelical churches
* Affinity is another British association of mostly conservative evangelical churches
* National Association of Evangelicals (US)
* Some Anglican churches are conservative evangelical
* Some Baptist churches are conservative evangelical; often they are independent or part of smaller denominations (eg the Grace Baptists) as they see the main Baptist associations as being compromised

Publications and publishing houses

* Evangelical Times
* Evangelicals Now
* Evangelical Press
* Banner of Truth Trust

Theological Colleges

* London Theological Seminary
* Oak Hill Theological College
* Wales Evangelical School of Theology

Conferences

*Evangelical Ministry Assembly
*Keswick Convention
*London/Northern Men's and Women's Conventions

Notable Figures in the Movement

Churches

*All Souls Church, Langham Place, London
*Duke Street Baptist Church, Richmond
*Jesmond Parish Church
*Metropolitan Tabernacle, London
*St Helen's Bishopsgate, London
*St Ebbe's Church, Oxford

Individuals

*John Benton - editor of Evangelicals Now and a minister
*John Blanchard
*Richard Coekin - minister of Dundonald Church
*Liam Goligher - minister of Duke Street Baptist Church
*Philip Hacking - former vicar of Christ Church, Fulwood, and chair of the Keswick Convention
*David Holloway - vicar of Jesmond Parish Church
*Martyn Lloyd-Jones
*Dick Lucas
*Peter Masters - minister of the Metropolitan Tabernacle
*Stuart Olyott
*J. I. Packer
*Vaughan Roberts - rector of St Ebbe's church, Oxford
*Jonathan Stephen
*Geoff Thomas - minister of Alfred Place Baptist Church
*Rico Tice

ee also

*Evangelicalism
*Conservative Christianity
*Fundamentalist Christianity

Notes

Bibliography

*cite book | last = Barclay | first = Oliver | authorlink = Oliver Barclay | title = Evangelicalism in Britain 1935-1995 | publisher = Inter-Varsity_Press | location = Leicester | date = 1997 | isbn = 0-85111-189-0
*cite book | authorlink = David Bebbington | last = Bebbington | first = David W. | date = 1989 | title = Evangelicalism in Modern Britain: A History from the 1730s to the 1980s | publisher = Routledge | isbn = 0415104645
*cite book | last = Murray | first = Iain H. | authorlink = Iain Murray | title = Evangelicalism Divided, A Record of Crucial Change in the Years 1950-2000 | publisher = Banner of Truth Trust | location = Edinburgh | date = 2000 | isbn = 0-85151-783-8
*cite book | last = Warner | first = Rob | date = 2007 | title = Reinventing English Evangelicalism 1966-2001 - A Theological And Sociological Study | publisher = Paternoster | isbn = 9781842275702

External links

* [http://www.agbcse.org.uk/ Association Of Grace Baptist Churches (South East)]
* [http://www.fulcrum-anglican.org.uk/news/2003/20030930watercourses.cfm?doc=2#a1 Canal, River and Rapids: Contemporary Evangelicalism in the Church of England] - Fulcrum post about Evangelicalism, which contains an outline of Conservative Evangelicalism in A.1
* [http://www.grace.org.uk/ GraceNet UK] - contains a large directory of conservative evangelical churches
* [http://www.latimertrust.org/about.htm The Latimer Trust - About Us] - Conservative evangelical thinktank, has a link to their basis of faith showing some conservative evangelical distinctives
* [http://www.rapidnet.com/~jbeard/bdm/Psychology/neoe.htm Neo-Evangelicalism Characteristics and Positions] - Fundamentalist commentary on separation - "To a large degree the difference between Conservative Evangelicalism and Fundamentalism is a matter of separation."


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • British Conservative Evangelicalism — For conservative theological views within Christianity, see Conservative christian Conservative Evangelicalism is a term used in Britain to describe a theological movement found within Evangelical Protestant Christianity, and is sometimes simply… …   Wikipedia

  • Evangelicalism — Evangelicals redirects here. For the indie rock band, see Evangelicals (band). Not to be confused with evangelism. Part of a series on Christianity …   Wikipedia

  • Conservative Christianity — For conservative political views within Christianity, see Christian right. Conservative Christianity (also called traditional Christianity) is a term applied to a number of groups or movements seen as giving priority to traditional Christian… …   Wikipedia

  • Conservative Congregational Christian Conference — The Conservative Congregational Christian Conference, colloquially known as the CCCC or 4C s, is a Protestant Christian denomination operating in the United States. The denomination maintains headquarters in Lake Elmo, Minnesota, a suburb of St.… …   Wikipedia

  • Evangelicalism —    Evangelicalism is a stream that emerged among conservative Protestants in the united states in the 1940s who opposed the modernism that prevailed in many older churches but refused to join    Fundamentalists in separating themselves from the… …   Encyclopedia of Protestantism

  • History of Evangelicalism — In continental Europe since the Protestant Reformation of the 16th century Lutheran churches have been called Evangelical (German Evangelische ) churches, in contradistinction to the Reformed churches of Huldrych Zwingli, John Calvin, and their… …   Wikipedia

  • Christian fundamentalism — For other senses of this term, see fundamentalism. A Christian fundamentalist preaching in 2007. Christian fundamentalism, also known as Fundamentalist Christianity, or Fundamentalism,[1] …   Wikipedia

  • Christian movements — are theological, political, or philosophical interpretations of Christianity that are not generally represented by a specific church, sect, or denomination. Religious * The House Church or Simple Church movement is a worldwide shift of Christian… …   Wikipedia

  • Christian movement — Part of a series on Christianity   …   Wikipedia

  • Messianic Judaism — This article is about a religious movement or sect. For the Jewish religion, see Judaism. For the messiah in Judaism, see Jewish messianism. For specific messianic claimants, see Jewish Messiah claimants …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.