Judgment


Judgment

In non-legal contexts, a judgment is a balanced weighing up of evidence preparatory to making a decision.

Background

In formulating cognitive judgments, a formal process of evaluation applies. A judgment may be expressed as a statement, e.g. S1: 'A is B' and is usually the outcome of an evaluation of alternatives. The formal process of evaluation can sometimes be described as a set of conditions and criteria that must be satisfied in order for a judgment to be made. What follows is a suggestive list of some conditions that are commonly required:

*there must be corroborating evidence for S1,
*there must be no true contradicting statements,
*if there are contradicting statements, these must be outweighed by the corroborating evidence for S1, or
*contradicting statements must themselves have no corroborating evidence
*S1 must also corroborate and be corroborated by the system of statements which are accepted as true.

Without a rigorous analysis, a rigid set of criteria to all forms of judgment. Often this results in unnecessary restrictions to judgment methodologies, excluding what may otherwise be considered legitimate judgments. For analogous difficulties in science and the scientific method see the Wikipedia entry on the scientific method.

From the criteria mentioned above, we could judge that "It is raining" if there are raindrops hitting the window, if people outside are using umbrellas, and if there are clouds in the sky. Someone who says that despite all this, it is not raining, but cannot provide evidence for this, would not undermine our judgment.

However, if they demonstrated that there was a sophisticated projection and audio system to produce the illusion of our evidence, then we would probably reconsider our judgment. However, we would not do this lightly, we would demand evidence of the existence of such a system. Then it would need to be decided again upon available new evidence whether or not it was raining.

Many forms of judgment, including the above example, require that they be supported by, and support, known facts which are themselves well supported, and its negation must be shown to be unfounded, before it is accepted as well founded.

ee also

*Choice
*Decree

External links

* [http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/judgement.html Judgment or Judgement?] - Choices in terminological spelling and usage


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Look at other dictionaries:

  • judgment — judg·ment also judge·ment / jəj mənt/ n 1 a: a formal decision or determination on a matter or case by a court; esp: final judgment in this entry compare dictum, disposition …   Law dictionary

  • Judgment — Judg ment, n. [OE. jugement, F. jugement, LL. judicamentum, fr. L. judicare. See {Judge}, v. i.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of judging; the operation of the mind, involving comparison and discrimination, by which a knowledge of the values and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • judgment — UK [ˈdʒʌdʒmənt] / US or judgement UK / US noun Word forms judgment : singular judgment plural judgments ** 1) [countable/uncountable] an opinion that you have after thinking carefully about something judgment about: It is still too soon to form a …   English dictionary

  • Judgment! — Studioalbum von Andrew Hill Veröffentlichung 1964 Label Blue Note …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • judgment — (n.) mid 13c., action of trying at law, trial, also capacity for making decisions, from O.Fr. jugement legal judgment; diagnosis; the Last Judgment (11c.), from jugier (see JUDGE (Cf. judge) (v.)). From late 13c. as penalty imposed by a court;… …   Etymology dictionary

  • judgment n.o.v. — judgment n.o.v. judgment n.o.v. abbr [Medieval Latin n on o bstante v eredicto]judgment notwithstanding the verdict Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • judgment — [n1] common sense acumen, acuteness, apprehension, astuteness, awareness, brains, capacity, comprehension, discernment, discrimination, experience, genius, grasp, incisiveness, ingenuity, intelligence, intuition, keenness, knowledge, mentality,… …   New thesaurus

  • judgment — [juj′mənt] n. [ME jugement < OFr < ML judicamentum < L judicare: see JUDGE, vt. vi.] 1. the act of judging; deciding 2. a legal decision; order, decree, or sentence given by a judge or law court 3. a) a debt or other obligation resulting …   English World dictionary

  • judgment — A formal decision, sentence or Order of a Court of Justice. (Dictionary of Canadian Bankruptcy Terms) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms 2012 …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • judgment — 1 conclusion, deduction, inference (see under INFER) Analogous words: decision, determination, ruling (see corresponding verbs at DECIDE): *opinion, conviction, persuasion, view, belief 2 *sense, wisdom, gumption Analogous words: intelligence,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • judgment — A sense of knowledge sufficient to comprehend nature of transaction. Thomas v. Young, 57 App. D.C. 282, 22 F.2d 588, 590. An opinion or estimate. McClung Const. Co. v. Muncy, Tex.Civ.App., 65 S.W.2d 786, 790. The formation of an opinion or notion …   Black's law dictionary


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