PATH Lift Bridge


PATH Lift Bridge
PATH Lift Bridge

PATH Lift Bridge in the foreground, with Harsimus Branch (Conrail), Wittpenn, and Lower Hack Lift bridges behind it
Carries PATH
Crosses Hackensack River
Locale Connecting Kearny and Jersey City, New Jersey
Owner PATH
Design Lift bridge
Material Steel
Opened 1900; 111 years ago (1900)
Coordinates 40°44′24″N 74°04′59″W / 40.740108°N 74.083048°W / 40.740108; -74.083048 (PATH Lift Bridge)Coordinates: 40°44′24″N 74°04′59″W / 40.740108°N 74.083048°W / 40.740108; -74.083048 (PATH Lift Bridge)
PATH Lift Bridge is located in New Jersey

The PATH Lift is a lift bridge carrying the Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH) rapid transit line across the Hackensack River between Kearny and Jersey City, New Jersey.

History

The bridge was built by the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) in 1900.[1] It was part of the PRR main line that terminated at Exchange Place in Jersey City. Upon the opening of the PRR North River Tunnels to Manhattan in 1910, the main line traffic was routed on a new alignment to the tunnels, and the Exchange Place line tracks were made available to the Hudson and Manhattan Railroad, a rapid transit line to lower Manhattan (later called PATH). Service on a new H&M line between the Manhattan Transfer station in Harrison, New Jersey and lower Manhattan began on October 1, 1911.[2]

Use of the bridge was shared by the PRR and PATH system, until PRR ended its service to Exchange Place in 1961. Since that time the PATH Newark – World Trade Center line has used the bridge exclusively.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society. "PRR Chronology, 1900." March 2005 Edition.
  2. ^ "Improved Transit Facilities by Newark High Speed Line". New York Times. 1911-10-01. http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9D05E2D71531E233A25752C0A9669D946096D6CF. 
  3. ^ Cudahy, Brian J. (2002). Rails Under the Mighty Hudson: The Story of the Hudson Tubes, the Pennsy Tunnels and Manhattan Transfer. Hudson Valley Heritage Series. 2 (2nd ed.). New York: Fordham University Press. pp. 62-63. ISBN 0-8232-2189-X. 




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