Gibraltarian cuisine


Gibraltarian cuisine
Gibraltar
Tipos de Gibraltar.jpg

This article is part of the series:
Culture of Gibraltar



Other countries · Atlas
 Gibraltar Portal
view · talk · edit

Gibraltarian cuisine is the result of a long relationship between the Andalucian Spaniards and the British, as well as the many foreigners who made Gibraltar their home over the past three centuries. The culinary influences include those from Malta, Genoa, Portugal, Andalusia and Britain. This marriage of tastes has given Gibraltar an eclectic mix of Mediterranean and British cuisine.

Below are some examples of typical Gibraltarian dishes.

Contents

Pasta

Rosto

Popular local pasta dish of Italian origin consisting of penne in a tomato sauce with beef or occasionally pork, mushrooms and carrots (among other vegetables depending on family tradition) and topped with grated "queso bola". The origin of its name is unknown, however, one theory is that it comes from the Italian arrosto (English: roasting) as similar dishes are eaten in Italy using roast pork instead.

Fideos al horno

A baked pasta dish very similar to Maltese mqarrun il-forn which consists of macaroni, bolognese sauce, and various other ingredients including egg and bacon that vary according to family tradition. The macaroni is usually topped with a layer of grated cheese or béchamel that melts during the baking process and aids in binding. Even though the dish's main ingredient is macaroni, the name fideos al horno is actually Spanish for 'baked noodles'.

Bread

Paloma, the last calentita street vendor in Gibraltar.
Gibraltarian Calentita is very similar to the Italian Farinata.

Savoury

Calentita

This is a locally baked bread-like dish, similar to the Italian farinata. It is made with chickpea flour, water, olive oil, salt and pepper. The word calentita comes from the Spanish word caliente, meaning hot or warm and has an oily texture. It was probably first given this name during the early 1900s when street vendors would shout out "Calentita!", informing people that it was fresh out of the oven. The last calentita street vendor, Paloma, is still remembered locally by the older generations.[1] Calentita is considered to be Gibraltar's national dish.[2]

Panissa

A bread-like dish similar to the calentita. Sharing its Italian origins, it is a descendant of the Genoese dish with the same name - "panissa". Unlike calentita the ingredients are first cooked in a pan to form a paste which is then left to set. When the polenta-like dough is set, it is cut into small strips and fried in olive oil.[3]

Sweet

Bollo de hornasso

A sweet and dry bread similar to the Spanish hornazo. It is made with self-raising flour, sugar, eggs, butter or margarine and aniseed. Bollos de hornasso are eaten around Easter just as in Spain, but in Gibraltar they are also popular during Christmas. Gibraltarian hornassos can normally be distinguished from the original Spanish hornazo as they do not tend to be decorated with hard-boiled eggs (however, Gibraltarian families of Spanish descent may still decorate them in this manner). It usually glazed with beaten egg and sometimes decorated with hundreds and thousands.[4]

Pan dulce

A sweet fruit and nut bread eaten at Christmas time. The term pan dulce means "sweet bread" in Spanish, but its origins lie in Italy with its ancestor being the panettone. Its main ingredients can include lard, margarine, sugar, self-raising flour, blanched almonds, raisins, sultanas, pine nuts, candied peel, eggs, aniseed and anisette among others. It is sometimes decorated with hundreds and thousands just like the bollo de hornasso.

History of pan dulce

Pan dulce is a staple food in Mexico and other Latin American countries. In the early 1800s the French introduced crispy rolls, baguettes, and rich pastries to Mexico. The French occupation of Mexico ended at the battle of Battle of Puebla (Cinco de Mayo) but the Mexican love of French bread remained. As the demand grew for this new bread, Mexican bakers quickly adopted the French techniques to make their own varieties. Everyone in Mexico seems to have a favorite, and there are many to choose from. It is said that the varieties of pan dulce number in the thousands, and they often have fanciful names. Some are the same shapes as you would find in France today but with a Mexicanized name. Since bread is inexpensive and filling, pan dulce has since become a key ingredient of the Mexican merienda.

Meat

Rolitos

A japonesa sliced in half

A thin slice of beef surrounding breadcrumbs, bacon, eggs, olives, vegetables and herbs. These can be baked, fried or cooked in wine. Rolitos is another dish of Maltese origin, similar to braġjoli. It is also known as beef olives in English, even though some families prefer making them with pork or even chicken. The word rolito comes from the Spanish word rollo meaning 'roll', as the meat is rolled to hold the other ingredients inside.

Confectionery

Japonesa

The japonesa (Spanish: Japanese lady) is a sweet fried doughnut filled with a custard-like cream. Japonesas are usually enjoyed at teatime or as a snack. They are traditionally coated in syrup or granulated sugar.[5] The origin of its name is unknown but resembles the Japanese dorayaki.

See also

References

External links



Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cuisine of the Mediterranean — Mediterranean cuisine is the food of the areas around the Mediterranean Sea.Whether this is a useful category is disputed: The idea of the ‘standard Mediterranean diet’ ... is a modern construction of food writers and publicists in Western Europe …   Wikipedia

  • English cuisine — This article is part of a series on British cuisine …   Wikipedia

  • European cuisine — French bread Italian pasta …   Wikipedia

  • British cuisine — This article is part of a series on British cuisine …   Wikipedia

  • Mediterranean cuisine — This article is about food of the areas around the Mediterranean Sea. For the dietary recommendation made popular by C. Walter Willett in the 1990s, see Mediterranean diet. Mediterranean cuisine is the food from the cultures adjacent to the… …   Wikipedia

  • Welsh cuisine — This article is part of a series on British cuisine …   Wikipedia

  • Scottish cuisine — This article is part of a series on British cuisine …   Wikipedia

  • Cornish cuisine — This article is part of a series on British cuisine …   Wikipedia

  • Culture of Gibraltar — Gibraltar This article is part of the series: Culture of Gibraltar Demographics of Gibraltar Gibraltarian people History of the Genoese in Gibraltar History of the Jews in Gibraltar History of th …   Wikipedia

  • Demographics of Gibraltar — Gibraltar This article is part of the series: Culture of Gibraltar Demographics of Gibraltar Gibraltarian people History of the Genoese in Gibraltar History of the Jews in Gibraltar History of t …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.